Waupaca Historical Society: Whispering Pines Park

Waupaca Historical Society: Whispering Pines Park



well welcome your shot but politically shot we're gonna try and talk quick so yeah I get too hot and sweaty in here but it's pretty comfortable so far my name is Jeff Jeff oh it's my brother Joel and my sister Jan they're the babies of the family we uh we aren't from walk back originally but we grew up on borrow Lake for this 1953 my first came up here with my grandma and my two cousins in the 1930s our uncle Augie and Ernie Olin was a teacher and a basketball coach it was back to high school and he ended up somehow knowing the Hildegard's and in 1953 we rented a cottage from them on Maura Lake which we enjoyed I think four summers in there until 1957 when our other grandparents bought the place we currently have on Mara Lake which is right across from the park the side of the park so we've been around for a while our intent with this was not to make money we printed the book we gave the book to the Tracy and aspirin Society just to get the cost of our printing covered and rest of it is all going to the Historical Society we've got a few here if there's interest let us know let Tracy knowing we can get more credit and work out the original with the Historical Society I'm winging it because I somehow lost my most money got passed out with the handout so you're probably gonna don't worry I do the the handouts that some of you got I don't know if everybody got them because there's a lot more people and when we expect it but what it is it's like a tuning piece on both sides one just as a poem about trees and the other one solved is a timeline of what happened it was my heart was my plan sparked when it started what was developed wind and then there's a map what was where you don't think I'd like to mention though at this year is a 1929 it's only birds built their house there started that whole thing now we look at it as I look at it as two different eras of the park there was Whispering Pines Park as it existed prior to 1974 I should say prior 1975 and now as it's been since then how many of you remember it from back in the old days good look like a building okay those are my niece's and they're not going to hassle us how many worked at Whispering Pines Park holy smokes that's which copy the book you're real and the first edition of the book we hid his identity called a Donald I think we decided no I mean like the rest of us works okay anyway so that's our background Mono Lake our involvement with Whispering Pines started in the 50s we spent a lot of time there as kids and especially after our grandparents all in the place that we have now somewhere around 1960 or 61 both their grandparents worked there my grandpa did some of the grounds keeping stuff bases our grandma random a suitor shop from I know sometimes in the 60 up until it closed in life limit so we also work there I work there in 1963 and 64 I was kind of illegal in 63 because I was underage but you know he carried in those days Joel worked there in 1968 along with Dennis because he and Dennis worked together in those days and Jan was kind of the unofficial 10 year old bouncer at the Museum right so anyways this this whole thing here to our project here kima Boggy the three of us decided I know 10 12 years ago almost now I think that is such a unique story and we had obviously a major interest in it and some knowledge not a lot but some and a lot of good memories that we wanted to preserve at some home because you go in the park now as you know and somebody had never been there before we'd have no clue of what was in there before everything that was in before and the fact that the older girls came in and put all this stuff out there for the public to use free of charge was incredible at the time and it served a big niche for a lot of families to do stuff you know it was during the Depression it was during the Second World War that people didn't have the money it was a bad time that the country was going through but here you had this part with all these amenities that make tables you could take it for free it can go down and feed the fish anyway I have to say again we're not experts on this we know a little bit we knew the Hildegard's albeit when I was very very young we knew them we had experiences there a lot of the stuff that we put in the book was stuff I had from direct discussions with them over the years years ago I should say people since then and we got a lot of stuff out of the wop at the county post kept a picture post which was a very very valuable resource for us to get information and photos we have a lot of photos I've got a photo album back there it's my master one that has a lot more photos in it than what we're going to show you here and what's actually in the book someday I'm going to donate them to sort Society too but for now I'm going to keep it so there's there's a lot of pictures out there this whole presentation I'm going to go through the history of Whispering Pines very briefly then we want to talk about our experiences there and respective years be hung out there to work there but more importantly we want to take a lot of time here as much as we need to get input from you folks here your memories because I want to learn we want to learn from you I'll be more than you're going to learn from us our whole goal here is to keep the memory going and to recognize what the billiards did now if you have any questions please ask them or con us as you go along other way it's going to take a break somewhere along the line here and we'll have time for questions and stuff too and then we'll also again have time for people to share the memories and thoughts their experiences as you want when we get there okay I'm supposed to watch the time because long winded let's do the I'll start out with the history I think we put the time that is an old picture of the entrance these color photographs are from the buyers family who also live on Mara Mara Lake Erwin buyers donated these to us a long time ago and the family has been very interested they live just while they're living right next to the park now there's no house between that in nineteen my holiday back up in 1887 Chris Hildegard was born in Denmark and he worked as a farmer he didn't really complete a lot of schooling before he moved here a bit and then it was 1906 he moved to Chicago he got a job there washing milk wagons for Borden's milk by the time he turned well I'm sorry he worked there for quite a while but then after I think was about 1918 he ended up rising up through the ranks and he with two partners started their own milk business called Morgan's now origins Borden's were very similar and there was some competition there but though the guards made a lot of money and I've built business and he married Emma Hildegard Emma Emma Gibson was her maiden name in 1918 she was a secretary in Chicago and they got married they lived in Chicago for 11 years after that till they moved up here well I should take that back they got the property up here in 1929 that's what I actually started Whispering Pines and they built their house there they lived in Chicago but summered up here until 1938 when they moved up here full time well now they did it I think was by design a little bit of luck involved too they sold out their milk business for a lot of money this was just before the Depression so they had a lot of money but what they did is they invested all of their property over the years they put everything they had into that their heart your soul their money everything they loved it up there it's up here I should say so they um let's see I remember this smell without my notes they they started out in 1929 the first thing they did is they built a rock garden facing the lake then they started adding flower beds because Emma loved flowers and she was really good with them so they started adding flower beds and before too long they started adding statues statuettes lawn ornaments things like that this thing all evolved over a number of years to what it kind of peaked out at in the 70s which was huge to souvenir shops refreshment stand a big Museum a major playground a nice developed waterfront and things like that at one point I think when you guys work there there was a campground here go around the coast 80 wild west side but it took him off of that all evolved the way the evolved dog is they open it up as a front yard to the public because it was so beautiful they were so impressed with the trees the animals and everything there they wanted everybody to be able to enjoy it so people came out and they by word of mouth they started coming then they start talking about well it'd be nice if we can bring a picnic and have a place to have a picnic so they put in from there it went well this is all nice pretty nice to have something to take with us to remember this place so a souvenir shop went up then I'll be nice if we didn't have to bring our lunch if we could buy a hamburger or a cup of coffee or ice cream and put in a refreshment stand and that's how this whole thing evolved just what the people wanted what the people asked for it and they delivered so that's how it kind of all evolved now this is in your hand oh this talks about some of the stuff already talked about in 1932 the one thing that's left there there's two things left there from the original part one is the stone stairway go down to the lake that was built in 1932 by Chris and Casey nobody casein or wiki was a world where one vet who came to work for Chris back in 1920 on his milk business they became very good friends in the end Casey retired and moved up here and he was the caretaker at the park up until it's closing in 1975 but anyway Casey built that stolen walkway with Chris and he always would say they built it in about three weeks he lost 15 pounds in the process there's a diet I don't think I'd want to do a button but anyway that's one thing the standing the other thing that standing is the concrete foundation for the refreshment hut which attends you first come in there and they intentionally kept that in there to put a picnic table on it so it could be wheelchair accessible for people I don't know how much that's used to tell you the truth but that's all that's left and we're going to get change in the pair of them anyway picnic grounds were opened in summer of 35 already by 1936 they had almost 13,000 people that had visited their house their yard that year 38 they moved there year around yeah they used to host garden club meetings it has a statewide garden clubs meet there the first one was in 1938 coffee shop opened in 39 this is a typo on there but in August of 39 they had 26,000 people visiting your to date first souvenir shop opened in 1940 second souvenir shop opened at 51 54 the big refreshment hut opened now this surprised me in 1954 they had 88,000 visitors that year in 1890 1956 that 80,000 in 57 they had 78,000 another 80,000 and 58 so I guess I would argue that the 50s were their peak years I mean you think about that that's incredible people coming through that place in 1955 that museum opened up I should back up on 54 back in 1954 I think that was probably their peak year because they had a lot of people coming but they did a lot of different things them too they had I think the largest number that ever went in there that ever visited apartment one day was a Sunday in July of 1950 654 I'm sorry where there were 6,500 people came in on that one day I mean I can't imagine and I work there in 54 also he opened he kept it open after Labor Day you know always open up Memorial Day enclose it Labor Day the 54 people were clamoring about well we still want to come here in the fall so they kept it open after Labor Day we got too cold and 65 Tandy Wawa was the property adjacent to the park on the other side of the road that cut the park in hand and they bought that in 1965 that was a whole separate resort type area they used to have robots and stuff on coke blade but that never quite made it into the 60s and it certainly didn't make it a 65 when Hildegard's bought it and they never did to it ever did too much with that it kind of kept that natural rate values I mean that was that's where the campground was now on August 18th 1966 crystal de Guerre died he had hurt problems and he died of a heart attack that summer but the story always went when he left Chicago and he was on heart medications and stuff and the story was I don't know if it's true or not but it was often repeated when he came up here he threw his medicine away and said the pines are my medicine well it was but something to it is he lasted till 66 that's what Casey moved up took over the I'm not gonna get into the wind storm we'll talk about that 75 Emma passed away and that was the end of it until I think it was January 4th I'm sorry she passed away and that was the end of it and that's when the park was turned over to the state the dedication was that made the state had shut down for two years while they renovated it or dismantled I guess and open it again two years later in the summer of 77 the map let's run through this real quick the blanket where everything was come off Whispering Pines Road we had the main road going in the parking lot that still exists there was a secondary gravel road ran alongside that pc's home was right at the edge of the park it was a cottage was a full house they called the cottage was over year round house walked up on the right hand side there was a private property there that ended up I don't know where that went but it was gone after the state took it over at the big playground there towards Marley from the playground he had the annex which was a second souvenir shop this was not as big as the third the mean one which was farther down the road then you had the refreshment hut and then you had that big picnic area back in there and these areas were all full of pea gravel they'd all been covered with pea gravel as Joe and Dennis and anybody else that worked the grounds knows about which we'll get into a little bit later down the road a little farther there's a private there still is a private residence down there and these folks came from Chicago a Hildegard's they were part of this Barrington group which was a group of investors out of Illinois the Chicago area it purchased all the land in the 1920s from Beasley Creek out to rural road and they subdivided it into what we call shushybye comeö Park and that's where a lot of the places our place included was part of that subdivision was planted out ended up by I'd say the 40s and into the 50s Hildegarde ended up owning pretty much all the property on Morrow lake with a few exceptions which they sold off over the year and ended up by the time we showed up on the scene to work there they pretty much just owned Whispering Pines Park proper but on the other side of the lake just past the boat landing as you go out towards rural road there is a there was a big section in there I don't know how many acres it was because it was kind of long and narrow but it was the Whispering Pines Park Wildlife Refuge and he kept that basically native and what animals they had deer in there and everything else it kind of broke my heart because now it's pretty hurt in a Creek Park and they were along deer hunting in there which probably kept them turning over in their grave but just what it is so anyway then you go past the private property they're backed into the Hildegard domine come down the road the garage was on the left the house was behind it there were a couple storage sheds there and it was at that back of the house where that stairway goes down that was one that was built in 32 to the pier the boathouse and they had those covered wagons down there if you remember those and I think I don't know for sure but it seems like those were if not the most photographed pieces of park stuff they were close to it I think we had our pictures in there I think everybody did at one time or another if he went down to the lake the path curved around following the lakeshore and there was a wishing well there as very little kids we always thought we were gonna make a lot of money and snuck in there and tried to find a pennies it's all with all mud and weeds and we just had nothing but beauty out of it then there was a little mill with little Dwarfs on there at a spring there was a spring that came down there and then across over a little bridge there was a gazebo on the shore of the lake to that past that there was a stairway that went up to the museum I'm sorry it went up to the main souvenir shop before I got to the museum that's where the main souvenir shop was and we'll have pictures of that pretty quick the museum between the museum and the Hildegard's home was a because an area called linger Lane again more pea gravel a lot of flowers out of chairs people sat there a couple of fountains big fountains things like that so that's pretty much the map of the park as I remember to back probably circa 1966 by the time I got there and by the time these guys got there there wasn't a whole lot of development done anymore I mean there was an awful lot of development done in the 30s 40s and 50s but by the time the 60s came around they were it slowed down a little bit Chris and Emma were more than happy just to sit and visit with people they still added something as a reliever equipment added when I was there but by the time the 60s came closer to an end a lot of the stuff a lot of the time has been maintaining things fixing things and salvaging stuff and holding it together now I think served a niche fact like I said during the Depression in the Second World War and after that to get into the 50s and things were pretty good I mean in addition to family oriented stuff being the focus people had more money people had more mobility so you had more people coming a lot of the people we got at the park came from the camps too we'd have school buses full of kids coming on the that whistling water yeah oh yeah yes yeah every regular flotillas of them coming but anyway my point is that people were into that and because like I said before they could come somewhere they'd have to spend any money the money they did spend was what they did voluntarily they want a souvenir that before we wanted a hamburger or ice cream bar for a dime they get it you know but they could come and spend the whole day there with the kids not spending money somewhere in the 60s things changed as we all know the chain was booming you had pontoon boats you had night clubs you had all kinds of other stuff going on and the big chain became more sexy than the little chain so more people started doing that and that out of the more of the pristine docile types of entertainment he had Fort Huachuca later the Ponderosa open up as competitors kind of but I think that that was happening Chris Hildegard died and that sternum triggers the beginning of the end I think okay so with that being said do you want it how do you folks want to do this you want to take a break somewhere along the line or you want to just get her out what everyone my goal here I get a college you know I've been here since 53 you know how old I am oh well anyway I'm again we want to hear your your stories and your memories and your thoughts about this but let me share your heart is first here in 1963 I started working there unofficially and my boss was oh okay anyway my boss was a guy well besides Chris Hildegard my self-appointed Foreman was a guy named Bob smalls who was our neighbor and bob was quite a character he and I got along real well but I remember the first day I worked there where there were two sets of outdoor outhouses toilets and said my job was to clean him out so he gives me a short shovel no tells me to go dive I didn't know if I should cry or get mad or anyway those are kind of fun days because I'd worked with Bob and Chris and it was just us basically plops Bob's day off was Tuesday and Chris and Emma would always go into town on Tuesday on Tuesdays I was in charge and I got to sneak off and drive that little tractor they had but anyway yeah trailer yeah yeah the problem with the trailer is every time I was a five he throw up and I had to ride the trailer and I felt kind of stupid as a 14 year old boy riding around this little trailer yeah perfect a sporty girl girls around you know but anyway so the process was this get up in the morning the uniform of the day was jeans boots t-shirt flannel shirt if it was cooler and we always had a rock at night matches and peanuts in our pockets that's where from the squirrels chipmunks which was constantly a part of the job matches were for burning trash so we started eight o'clock we go over there go to the house get the working orders for the day doesn't have a list of stuff out there first order of business we had to police the grounds for trash so we pick up trash I do that empty the trash bins now there was a couple couple things they had going there as part of the trash collection system they had 55-gallon barrels that you guys still used back then where you jump all the people are supposed to throw the garbage in there from the picnics and stuff and some did some didn't but we would collect the trash and for what the barrels they also had I don't remember that but they usually have little black cast iron pots on hangers strategically down the road around the area people put cigarette butts cigar butts trash in there unfortunately lot of times they put in who Tandy and melted ice cream so that got kind of nasty but anyway we had to throw the stuff in all that stuff into the 55-gallon barrels haul it in the incinerator which was down there by the playground of all things and burn all that stuff so we get that transplant up then we had to reach grab a pea gravel and we have special double wide brakes were you're dragging along behind you because the lion's head to the street my nipples all had to be times I've never seen it before since but then again I was so traumatized and but the point was well-taken that supposed to look nice but the problem was ten minutes after we read that it's more you never know the difference but anyway that was what it was so it was I'll clean up reeking then the job was to kind of go through the flowerbeds type the begonias well the begonias at first they started planning up to 500 begonias a year at the ending was 650 and and they would have the big rolls going from the news souvenir shop and most of them but they're all over the place too he had a nice rose garden down by the lake by the gazebo so the flowers were big deal but the way we had to deal with that is they were drooping he had these green little wooden stakes we have taken at these little green twist ties and tie a little thing that was the job then every third day we had to water him and he had an intricate underground watering system he piping in there I mean it was incredible this way he had a setup but we'd have to water the flowers to him then we break for lunch and then in the afternoon the afternoon was either some special project or painting or fixing something was again like I said by this time even by the mid-60s things were starting to kind of need a lot of attention or lead more attention than they used to work from 8:00 in the morning until about 4:30 or 5:00 I have no idea what I made in 1963 I think it was about $30 but it's 64 my first w2 my first social security report was from 1964 that whole summer I made a hundred sixty four dollars but Jan what did you get for working in this yes you did again they have these like horses and of course they actually have it white ending up I'd love to be after that horse it cost five dollars afford it so anyway the the process would go for the rest of the employees well they'd come in at nine o'clock that's when they get the cash drawers and they give their instructions for the souvenir shops for the hut and things like that they go to the house give that go down and set up shop the other things I'd have to do a key flea if it was really busy and the refreshments standing up the first mud hut I'd have to help out in there I could open pop bottles I could keep so I couldn't sell I could I could pant all of potato chips I could never work the cash register which was a real relic and then the hamburgers and hot dogs were way beyond me you know but I do have to help out in there once in a while that was kind of fun was kind of different the one job I really didn't like though in the big souvenir shop it was set on the hill kind of overlooking where the channel comes into Marly and there was a basement underneath there and that's where their sperm room was for all the souvenirs well I'd get a list and I could hardly read it and I'd have to go in there and had one light bulb and the whole thing and you had to work their way through the smell of the cedar the moccasins everything else and tried to figure out what was what in here and I hated that it was just terrible I get claustrophobic in there Oh Jan you want to take that we get great superheroes lots of little seed your boxes follow it later everybody makes everybody where these are special mr. Heinz apart because they are sticker up lots of jewelry well I don't turquoise it's there's some really nice stuff oh and cigars there were lots of cigar smoke cigars which we never quite figured out how our grandma dealt with that yeah well the moccasin got a lot of moccasins are sold out and nice ones for some jewelry and expensive yeah tomahawks we also have a post her grant were brown paper lunch bags basically something pretty nice like a wooden bird statue or something all these cigars that was nothing with Chris he smoked cigars a lot and he was he was quite a character and if anybody knew hamburger ever saw him he was short stocky and he had hearing aids in both ears but he was quite the character he was a great guy what am I missing with I think those were pretty much my duties there and stuff they like I said it wasn't unusual to have a lot of people there especially on the weekends as he encouraged from the numbers I was still now before Saturdays and Sundays were their biggest days July in August of course with a busy that's how they accommodated all those people when we went back there now or we go back there we cannot imagine how everything fit in there everything looks so much smaller let alone putting 6500 people in the middle of that add a network wonderful white pines come from the trees over there yeah well they were native to there big ones they were there they're kind of yeah a lot less than they're worth all right if they could lead into you guys talk about that windstorm yeah let's do this slide this is back when the hut first whispered plants are cut first open there's Emma there's a playground here's the playground the building in the Far background kind of make others live and over here is the annex that's the early picture of the picnic roll the hud-1 thing when I work there 1968 I didn't be much different than what Jeff has already described there's pretty much a routine especially for the younger sort of hope you can keep up with regular meat mostly trash collecting great a lot sorry I've got them various sort every now and then you get a major project the reason I mentioned this now is that this picture reminds me of one every one of these picnic tables some of them look pretty horrible but a lot of more built with these posts so they won't the seats and the tabletop and mounted straight into the ground on posts so we spend a lot of time post hole diggers even I don't have the rapid you had frost he was in everybody that could have one that's probably the most famous phone we have in that photo album I got back there I've got probably five or six different renditions of this over the years that was one thing about this there's a lot of photos in there that are the same thing but if you look close the details are different the park was always changing there was always something was always under construction Chris was always doing something different adding something taking something away you know it was always changing from one year to the next sometimes a little ways at the end it wasn't like that but back in the heyday it was when when the parents donated it to the State Capitol yeah well everything went went for sale at a two-day auction in June of 75 at 75 and my wife Chris and I went to that and I couldn't take it save it all wet it was a two-day option everything's gone everything was taken and sold I don't know how many hundreds of birdhouses they sold and everything down to the vehicles everything in the museum they all those rock formations everything in the playground some of that went I did hear from somebody in Wisconsin Rapids who had gotten two of the covered wagons and he was a friend to his head up I think was a golf course over there where they had a bunch of this stuff the rock formations split rail fences and things like that they took over there but yeah everything went it was incredible and the auction went fast for two full days there was so much stuff it went so fast so everything went now the Hildegard's gave the land of the state but east state got everything above ground her property and she got some of that money out of that but there was also I believe a nephew and maybe a niece who we never knew or even heard of until after the passing of Emma who inherited a lot of this the money that came out of this but the state got everything and after the whole place was cleaned out they went to town and they tore down the buildings everything they had they had to take the buildings out in pieces because they couldn't get because of the trees I do know of an individual who told me he bought the museum and it last I heard was a cottage down the Wildrose but they had taken that out in sections now but they took that yes so pull be entirely but yeah everything plus they had to rip of all the piping and stuff underground and it was incredible how that changed yeah yeah that's right that's right and they did that again lately in the last several years because they felt abused in that place no we don't want that so we had to put it back really oh yeah yeah yeah it was incredible help it was incredible that all went and some of the stuff I mean it wasn't your regular auction by any means yes ma'am I remember hearing that house on Main Street children with an umbrella Oh could be could very well be yeah see I've got some big gaps in my memory at the time like it so I was kind of discouraged with that Milwaukee and how that all went down yeah and you know I struggle with that like a lot of people did because I really was hoping to stay up saying well then I don't Emma wanted that way and they'd set it up that way and I didn't go back in there for 12 years after that I couldn't but then I started change I'm like thinking a little bit figuring Irish it wasn't exactly what the Hildegard's wanted they wanted to keep it going like it had been but face it there was no way the state could do that no way to escape would they quit and there was no way you're gonna get around sorry not charging people to come in there the state owned it and of course state government like every other government you're at the you're at the mercy of budgets and everything else and you know that wouldn't have lasted so I changed my thinking to where it's sad now I'm thinking all right this is the best that could have happened considering everything it went back the halt was when they came it's a nice place where people going just relax and chill out in my mind is kind of home probably was when they move there and it's kind of Mother Nature comes back to claim its own and you know we've been in there Joe always says he can't find a piece of pea gravel for the way from gotta see him Brooke okay so where are we now there's Esslinger Lane this is the original coffee shop and that actually stayed on the property the state didn't take that down till later they use it for storage for tools and stuff but then it started getting vandalized so they took it down number of years ago but this is linger Lane and that statue was over in here that we're talking about but these chairs they were all over the park there I don't know how many hundred of them those chairs and the other things that they handle out of around the playground area were these seats it Christian made out of track those metal tractor seats the concrete base and a high bar and those are all homemade what would happen is they closed the place down after they moved here they closed the place down they need work all winter building stuff they're all in the book back there oh no I don't think so oh yeah yeah those you know what those were from Basinger and the science those backs were road signs yeah they painted over the old road signs and there's the clocks in the museum yeah but there were guns there were all kinds of antiques or all kinds of stuff animals I remember one time a guy I know from the DNR called me up because they found a guy that had a stuffed bald eagle and wanted to know if he said he got it from the Whispering Pines auction and I said yeah there was one there I think that I think would have been it yeah yeah yeah yeah and that went to the University Wisconsin I uh don't know I don't know where they where they there's the old milk talking baby remember that I know it doesn't I have that it doesn't like that bad shape she gave that to me in 1968 yeah that was that was actually still functional yeah yeah I remember you and Venice were working when a knight now that was back at that point Ivan was back behind the museum museum everything on this side was built Kenny wanna walk property this was the old refreshment stand for teddy voila which was pink thanks good luck we never used the freedom storage but at Hampton were Express would stand there this was the old house on that property and by the time or by mid late sixties so this wasn't okay there you start walking on the trail yeah for to draw hillside down to the lake like this you have pictures of that I remember that very it's just staring at it for hours on the moon we dance we have pictures of it up the hillside we have some some ranking with this slideshow yeah yeah particularly there and in the albums of Sultan there there are so from the early years the very first thing that they developed as a rock garden was actually not where the one that it ended up which was the hillside Delhomme kind of above the covered wagons so that was actually the yeah there is yeah yes there is I'm not sure what that is so that's the truck others is the Linda Lane again they innovated quite a bit for materials you have anyway you know what these are he had a truckload of carpet handles and they not only made the sense out of it they made benches out of a tool there's a souvenir shop now a couple of things here showing the flag drill yeah that flag at the time there were 48 states they put that up there every star had a stolen from the stated representative and those correspondence tables there's several different pictures of those and everything that fetched huts or thatched roofs and people would buy their postcards they'd get stamps they right out of the correspondence table and over here there was a covered little covered wagon on a stone pedestal one of my Jobs was every day before I quit I had to pick the mail up out of that little box or that little covered way gonna said to his mail on it and take it out to the road to the big mailbox so it was quite the delivery system there was a real big tree that was hit by lightning on the corner of George lake and they were younger yeah yeah it's yeah it's it's over yeah we have a picture of that in the book it was a 400 year old pine that's the stairway they're going down to the lake and that's where they're there people counter was they had a system set up where he'd step on his step and then they also had a book a visitor log that they kept a lot of the tables there this is just a representative shot of one of the things that was in Iraq method was George Washington and there was an eagle – eagle was George Washington there are photos from a staircase let's hope it hurts house at the top the staircase is not the railings with the actual stuff still exists that was one of our jobs tool every morning we had to go down the lake and check things out and I always had to clean trash out of that windmill there are little doors in there and of course when we bring the trash everything sorted enough later speaking of burning real quick burning trash in those 55 gallon barrels one of the hazards of that was dealing with baby raccoons the babies that get in there they couldn't get out a few guys but that was the only piece of grass and whole Park we ever seriously there's only there's which isn't fair and that's not there either there was a thing about the time then at the time up to and including 74 I guess the gates were never locked and there were no chains there are no signs setting hours there was no keep out signs there was a sign that said no alcohol allowed in the park but during the time I was there I know it changed a little bit we're at the end of the sixties and seventies but there was actually no problem at all it was no trouble at all in the park Chris would say for the first 26 years he was there he said never had to call the police or the Sheriff's Department 26 years never been a problem there wasn't we had no problems at all I think by the end of the sixties things started to get a little bit weird people were coming in there parking in the parking lot partying and things like that Casey the caretaker at the time took it upon himself to patrol the parking lot at night and that kind of got a little yes sometimes it carried a gun but the point I'm making is back in those days there was no time at all there whatsoever that was wherever ever heard of now of course that's a different world we live in administrator for resources no no it was it was just a big section of the tree it was like and I couldn't like too long yeah but it was new yeah there there is a picture of it in decided is this see in here yeah in there in the thing book I know anyway the thing is huge it was asked me to be partner years old so it was right at the corner house no that's all and I thought you know what happened – I have no clue what happened – I don't know you get it I deal with a tree that won't man no I tiger I remember it was during my lifetime yeah I remember seeing it I remember hearing about it it floated and I remember them putting it up there yeah Oh yeah and there was one tree that was all these big huge truck tires that did not come down to I mean oh yeah I don't honestly know but I do know that he Chris especially had a lot of connections and people were bending over backwards to donate things the bigger his collections got the more people would donate he bought a lot of things granted because they have but I don't know we're just talking about that earlier today that that squirrel card game I have no clue where that came from or where it went I wish I knew because that wasn't so neat to have the question I give this house I thought they hated it but I was wrong we got to know the woman who owned who lives in that house it has that one house now the the one that was part is her grandfather was part of the Barrington group that additionally established all this so that's what she belong to stay there you know anyway she told me that she loved it it was like a little private little playground and the other older people are the adults their parents and grandparents how are they did pretty well I don't know I can speak for them I know buyers like that lived next to Casey's house there I don't know anything about the people that live right off the parking lot on the right but they were three positive about the whole thing as matter of fact this woman that's there now she and her mother Joyce are my bags waste I was when her dad died it wouldn't take him down but that would be it still is a challenge because people still go to poor to there and it's like you know I have a lot of money to see it's not like it used to be but still it's okay so we could talk a lot longer but we don't want to would like more for you guys those of you come stalling Fujin there remember it work there or whatever can you think of one thing that comes to mind when you think of the old Whispering Pines yeah yes yes yes there you go cuz we were talking about the senses and stuff and Joel's always said the songs are the ones that I love the south at peak gravel down the rate for sure I can still remember there's some but the playground sounds especially what the swing sound like one of these your Tatars something like five down the bottom those sorts of things I almost perfect yeah oh yeah one thing that I was stuck among a million others but around the hut one time and around the main souvenir shop that he had rows and rows of pinwheels that always stuck in my mind yes yes rose and checking out all these lights and that my red foxes yeah I think there's some I think most of that stuff stayed obviously it must've stayed fairly vocal unfortunately so much time has passed I've got so much it was long gone I used to you know go to rummage sales and auctions and stuff around here and souvenir shop gift shops and stuff looking for old memorabilia for mr. pines and don't find much in our home we followed a bunch stuff on eBay that's where I got most of this stuff that's where I got a lot of the photos actually she was one of four stars the problem with the folding is a lot of the old ones are slack wait but the other problem with photos that we would try to take it apart so dark in there I think you should tell them about oh yeah well I worked there from 1968 to 71 when I was going to high school I worked for a dollar fifty an hour forty-eight hours a week my take-home was 56 bucks probably the best job I ever had some of the greatest people I've ever met and one of my jobs every morning was break that gravel all the way around her place and she would come out to inspect everyone this is a second a trivia question there was Chris and Amma Hildegard did you know there was a third Hildegard do you know who it was Willy Willy so she'd come out with her cane and she'd go around and she point things out to me underneath as she was walking along Willy would he's a big fat old boy and every time he stepped he passed gas motorcycle I bought a motorcycle in I think my junior year 305 scrambler hung up and I pull it in the park and I used to park it just out in front of one of the garages so mrs. Hill the guy came up to me one day she says Dennis I don't mind you bringing the bike here but you're gonna have to put it in the garage – yeah – just another comment about William Lawson terrier routine when I was there Chris Sublette evolved morning around the party people Willie didn't go too far but he explored things and a lot of things to smell a lot of things in check out well a well a where are you Willy that was that was a morning the afternoon routine was his Emma would head down to the hut and Chris would follow her a little bit later with a Buick Buick and will he jump the back seat so will it get it right down to the they sit out there with Willie in the Buick sleeping well they visited with everybody else oh I know another thing I was going to mention I forgot about the systems there they had an intricate communication system that consisted of ring crank telephones anybody remember those every main building had went in there and they could call from the house to the hut or the hut the souvenir shop depending on how many rings it was it was it would tell you we'd ever call it so I don't member I think the house was one and I don't the best said in word but that was that was pretty neat when I work on the souvenir shop we would call my cat hammer lunch ready when I got down there and it was Oh far oh yeah yeah we were very very efficient and then the hours were never this I guess consistently set because depending how many people were in the park that's when Chris or Emma would call on the phone until they'll have to shut down or the souvenir shop shut down look we be anywhere to 4 o'clock to 6 o'clock you know the guy our grandpa worked there for a long time there was a story you told about her being in the hut and I'm sorry listen her shop with you in the store during the storm and she was so calm and she was like comforting this little girl that was terrifying which wasn't the speaking of storms there were like three different types of rainstorms that I remember experiencing there you'd have like an all-day Soaker which usually meant we didn't have to work or if there was some inside job Julie would you have these little little miners rainstorms will come up intermittently and stuff like that we usually work through those but then you have the major dark clouds started with you after the bang that to of the one that you guys had 68 but I remember those come in several times a summer in the afternoon and that was just it was crazy experiences I was oh yeah a little bump in the middle of it they have a copper on the top oh he has steps to go up and show me arrows going on like two stories high on Eliza up ahead yeah like big people swings they had little toddler swings with the safety bars and they had the horse they had a couple of merry-go-rounds he had a big green merry-go-round the smaller leaner popular my mother would take this there she oh yeah and you could tell that I mean obviously we know a lot been working there and knowing them and all that but in the afternoon when I go by there they will all convene they start sitting in chairs by the hut but then they always convene to a big picnic table and cause a lot of people let me read some to you quick clothes our part of it with this that it speaks to the very thing we're talking about what kind of people they work this one here at the crew State in August of 66 individual named G H word store doc and might and all secretary-treasurer law that the Chamber of Commerce wrote this for the paper it's entitled a tribute to crystal the garden the chain Lakes area and the tire welfare community mourns the loss of a good friend with a passing of crystal Nagar that his memory will linger on migrating from Denmark at the early age of 19 years this was an example of the advantages and opportunities offered to industrious individuals from the old country he purchased a milk business operated successfully closed a retirement in 1929 you're tired 42 together with this way is settled in the wilds of wok accounting on what is known tomorrow lake immediately they started to build a haven in the wilderness that's difficult to find words that will adequately describe its beauty this will be married love people and you love the outdoors the slogan we're nature lovers meat is symbolic of the spring pines and wanted people to enjoy it with them the beauties of nature the beauty of peaceful surroundings of hundreds of tall pine trees over the years beautiful beds of gorgeous flowers are added and a collection of antiques while the animals of birds seem to sound the friendliness christine lagarde found sanctuary in the solitude of whispering – the 37 years untold thousands of visitors have enjoyed the hospitality has always prevailed at Whispering Pines grandparents enjoyed tea and the grandchildren to visit the beauties they themselves enjoyed us children is the outstanding attraction on the Chimel links for young and old alike during the intervening years because Hildegard became a legend in the area he exemplified the true spirit of America yet a some soup Rishi ation of what nature provided for him and he wanted others to enjoy it yes Chris Hildegard has gone to his reward but the winds will continue to blow through the stately pines and the memories of what he has contributed towards the pleasure and the enjoyment for others will always remain as a monument to his memory so then a January 9th 75 after a hematite this is the the eulogy that was spoken by Reverend Eugene Berkey officiated at a funeral we went to that that's with her grandparents I think anyway he brought to what that county post again two and a half years ago my family and I were driving around the channel Lakes and kind of getting acquainted excursion since we renewed it all packet area we followed a sign that directed us to Whispering Pines Park what an enjoyable afternoon that turned out to be a towering grove of majestic pine trees shading an area of swings slides murder grounds and games our children were delighted as they raised from one thing to the next while some older people set peaceably benches or logs friendly squirrels played on the rustic fences love chipmunk scampered over the world green grounds flowers welcome everyone with beautiful blossoms of red and orange I couldn't believe it there was no parking lot attendant Murphy there was no gate or admission charge no advertisement to buy this or that not even the box with donations to help maintain the park it was one of those times I wanted to buy refreshments for the children because I thought that must be how they make their money but the prices were reasonable barely enough for even a modest profit after expenses the amber sunset over the bluish green waters Marley came too soon that day we didn't have enough time to see her the relaxing atmosphere this natural carefree oasis as we drove away I sent in my way I wonder who owns that park I wondered why they permitted others to browse so freely knowing how often things get broken the children plan I couldn't imagine why they divide us so much equipment free I really wanted to write a note of thanks and appreciation of the owners acquired as I now realize it was not anywhere near enough of a few people to find out who owned it even though everyone knew the name of the park no one seemed to know the names of the public benefactors of the to thank for its facilities uterus response my acquire requires requires enquiries was just a retired couple from Chicago the caretaker who's been around for a long time last Friday I found the names of people that unknown Leigh my life because they had cared enough to share a beautiful piece of God's creation it was too late and the Holy Garrett died and then it was announced that she and her late husband Crist had maintained and opened the park to the public the front yard which was often mistaken for a state or county park since 1929 the Hildegard's did not own thousands of acres of land which we usually associate with with great philanthropists but the 30 beautiful acres they possess they were willing to share with others he discovered the beauty of a grove of pine trees along a lake they didn't opportunity to sell a successful milk finished business in Chicago with the proceeds that retired early so they could develop the property and share with the public as good stewards they tried to make it nicer nicer might have a place a place for children to play obviously they loved people and he had discovered that the only way to find happiness and contentment is not to hoard of treasure to oneself share with others their love of nature beauty and people enable them to touching the floats the lives of many people for good we ended their lives of care may their life's of caring and sharing a part of God's beautiful creation be an example for all of us it was pretty touched by that other pot you know spread the word now keep this alive

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *