This is Not a Drill with Ali Moore: A Cyber Security Hypothetical.

This is Not a Drill with Ali Moore: A Cyber Security Hypothetical.


Russia’s infiltration of the US election
campaign sent shockwaves through the US and now its reverberations are being
felt by Australia’s political establishment. This is the new frontier of warfare,
it’s the new frontier of espionage. The cyber attack that started Tuesday
is wreaking havoc across the globe Wednesday. Crippling thousands of computers,
disrupting operations at ports from Mumbai to Los Angeles and halting
production at a chocolate factory in Australia Every second of every day
hackers are hard at work across the globe. In Australia alone there were
47,000 cyber incidents in 2017. That’s 128 a day, 5 every hour. Many of them will be online scams or frauds. If you think something is a scam, it probably is. So don’t respond. The rest are even more serious. It could be hackers holding a to ransom. Blocking access to files until money is paid. Or stealing staff log on details to access
corporate or government systems. Or a denial of service attack designed to effectively shut down a network by
overwhelming it with requests. The census website was subject to something called
‘denial of service’. Outsiders blocking traffic. It repelled three attacks, but it
couldn’t stop a fourth which coincided with both the peak period of Australians
trying to log on and the hardware blocking overseas traffic failing. In just one month, earlier this year there were 7,200 denial of service attacks on
Australian targets. The intelligence agencies had a high degree of confidence the attack came from China. Officially it’s foreign States which have the
greatest power to compromise Australian networks. I can confirm reports that the
Bureau of Meteorology suffered a significant cyber intrusion which was
first discovered early last year. Cyber crime cost the economy more than a
billion dollars a year and the government says malicious activity is
becoming more frequent, more sophisticated and more severe. One in four small businesses have been hit but big business often has the most to lose, along with major institutions. And many are vulnerable, running obsolete
technology which can’t be updated or patched to address a weakness. Last November 41% of critical systems at Victoria Police and four key state government departments were labeled obsolete by the
state’s Auditor General. And Victoria is not the only state using outdated technology. so what happens if operators lose control of a power grid? or hospital staff can’t access patient records? Hackers can launch a large-scale
strategic attack within minutes. It’s happened overseas and it could happen here. Tonight, in our hypothetical cybersecurity crisis, it will.

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