The Last National Park [OFFICIAL INDIEGOGO CAMPAIGN]

The Last National Park [OFFICIAL INDIEGOGO CAMPAIGN]


Amanda: My first experience with
land as a child. Was when I was running and I fell down on the
dirt. And I got upset. And I rolled my fist up and I
hit the earth and I said, you know, darn you. And then my grandma said you
don’t ever do that. You don’t ever abuse the earth. That’s an actual living being. And there’s spirits there and
you don’t hurt Something that’s holy. Alistair: Once I got here I was
like, “Wow. This is so beautiful.” It was lush and green. It rained. And I just felt alive here with
the landscape. It was amazing because I feel
like it physically manifested. And I felt like I had belonged
here and this was the right decision to be here. Amanda: There’s doesn’t seem to
be land that is not owned by someone or that is being
cultivated or that is being used or abused. So this land has always been
Indigenous territory. But again we’re taught to, we’re
taught to believe that this is this is private land or federal
land. When it has always been used by
Indigenous people. And many times we are taught to
feel like like we’re outsiders on our own territory. Mishauna: Erasure of American
Indians for a large part in the National Park system as it has
occurred. Is also because they were
established by Theodore Roosevelt at the time when his
goal, as he stated, was to pulverize tribal makeup. So putting National Parks in
that context, of the pulverizing of native communities,. I think that’s where, if we
think about it in that context, it becomes clear what those
particular goals are. Amanda: Indian people in general
have always seen their identity through the Reservation. And through the identity of
whatever a Reservation is. And we’re all kind of just been
made to believe that that’s all we have when that’s not the
case. Mishauna: What has happened is
the change of land into property. So we have the Treaty Era of the
1860s, right, that were largely coercive,. Putting people onto
reservations, which is a colonial geographic space, yes,. But even those spaces have been
renamed and reclaimed. And they’ve been renamed and
reclaimed as places of home, as places of being, as places that
become important. Reservation spaces by American
dominant ideas of, cultural ideas, they’re supposed to be
places of poverty, Places of destruction or damaged
spaces. They’re always seen as damaged
spaces rather than anybody seeing the beauty and the
creativity and the survival. From the very start we’ve been
remapping and reclaiming our places as people have pushed us
around and pushed us out of places. So what happens in the remapping
and reclaiming,. Every space is an Indigenous
space first, Like every city is an Indigenous
city, you know, Every rural area is an
Indigenous rural, rural area. So the remapping and reclaiming
come about because it’s remembering and recognizing
that. Amanda: You know we’re
relearning our language. We’re relearning our spiritual
ways. And I think that’s what this
land allows us to do. It allows us to rediscover our
indigenous identity. And be who we are as Indigenous
people. Sarah: Preserve this place for
our younger generation. So they can tell a story. Something that was told to us
and they can carry that on. Mishauna: We’re not just
returning to something nostalgic and old, right? Or no, but nostalgic and
meaningfully old, right? Or historic. We’re not trying to return to a
pristine past. But rather to use the very
important aspects of that past or traditions and past et cetera
to create new maps now. I see the remapping as a
reclaiming of traditional knowledges. But also a reclaiming of
accountability to each other in the non-human. Those forms of maps of
recognising that also just helps people be more accountable, I
think, to each other and to the place where they live. Amanda: And any time that you
can preserve something as beautiful as Bears Ears that has
such a deep connection to different tribes. Um, that’s worth fighting for. Because you will you will never
find something like this in the future. It’s just, it’s not going to
exist anymore.

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