SBCC Board of Trustees 2/14/2019

SBCC Board of Trustees 2/14/2019


(Gavel)
»: Good afternoon, everyone. A call to order this
meeting of the Board of Trustees for Santa Barbara City College. Will everyone stand to say the
Pledge of Allegiance? . (Applause) I Pledge Allegiance to the flag
of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it
stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with
liberty and justice for all. (Applause) For the record all Members of
the Board of trustees are present . Let me say a few welcoming
comments for everyone. We have a full house here today, at
least it is almost full. I noticed the parking lot was
full. And we welcome each and every one of you. There are a
few items that many of you want to address during public comment
and I assure you that we are here to listen and understand
your concerns. That is why we decided to move
the meeting to this larger venue and on behalf of the Board, I welcome
all of you. First I want to explain that in
order to speak during the public
comment portion of our meeting, which will occur very shortly at the start of our
agenda, you will need to fill out a speaker form. I believe
many of you have already done that. It is what we use to call you to
come forward to the podium. We need to collect the forms for
everyone who wants to speak and we have two staff members
handing out the forms. Please raise your hand if you need a speaker slip and they will help
you out . I just see one hand, a couple
of hands, one here and one in the back of the room. If
somebody could get a speaker slip to them. The staff who are collecting the
forms will stay in the aisles to collect them while we continue to make
introductory remarks, but we need them filled out and turned
in before we begin or continue with our agenda . Second, I want to announce
that we have an adjustment to tonight’s
agenda. The presenter on the ombuds
program, Bruce MacAllister from Santa Fe New Mexico had flight problems due
to weather and could not make it. So we are working to reschedule
his presentation at hopefully, our next meeting. The idea for the ombuds program
that is designed to address on complaints and difficult issues arose last fall out of
work by the Board’s Ad Hoc Committee on equity and we are
eager to further consider the Ombuds program. Most importantly tonight I want
to acknowledge the significant news we received last week from
Dr. Beebe. Dr. Beebe will be retiring this summer as he faces
health related matters that need attention. As a board we are
sorry that he has made this decision, but we fully
support him. He will continue to have our complete confidence
during his remaining time with us and we told him
emphatically that his health comes first. This board will soon begin the
process to select an interim Superintendent/President
President and ultimately, turn to the selection process of a
permanent leader for the college. You will hear more from us as
the process proceeds. Our next item on the agenda is
recognitions. We don’t have any recognitions
this evening. So we are now going to move to
public comment. I would like to explain a few ground rules for the public comment
portion of our meeting. Some of you here today have been here
before, but some of you are here for the first time. So let me walk through a few
items. The purpose of the public comment period is to give
you an opportunity to share your opinions with us. The most important rule we have
and will enforce is there is to be no talking over a speaker or
making noise while someone is speaking. I
thank you in advance for honoring that rule. To paraphrase something I read
by an opinion writer yesterday quote, “The First Amendment is built on the
right and even obligation to speak up and when needed, to protest, but not to
interrupt and prevent others from speaking. ” Close quote . Do we have all the speaker
slips? We have I think 60 speaker
slips, which is certainly far more than I think we have ever
had since I have been on the Board, but let me say that our rules set a 20-minute
combined limit for each subject addressed
in each comment and a 5-minute limit for each speaker, but as
you see we have a very large number of attendees who want to
address us and as the chair I had the discretion to adjust the limits.
Thus in order for everyone to have a chance to speak I have
decided not to impose the 20-minute limitation,
but enforce a 2-minute time limit for each speaker. Do I
hear any objections to that limitation by the Board? Trustee Haslund?
»: One can say a great deal in two minutes. »: It would be helpful if
you could curtail your comments. »: Just a few more ground
rules. Please note that our rules do not allow you to give
your allotted time to other speakers. We want to hear from you
directly. In order to accommodate
everyone, I request that you not repeat the arguments made by
others. If everyone can follow that rule, we will hear all of the comments
that you want to provide us in a shorter amount of time. I also
would ask that you please direct your comments to the Board and
not anyone in the audience. As I said we want to hear from
you and that is what the section of our agenda is all about. And
finally, we will be calling up a speaker’s three at a time so you
can get up and make your way to the podium, stand behind the
current speaker, and be ready to address us. And this will
ensure a more efficient and timely process. If you arrive
at the podium and have no comments or conclude before
your two minutes, we will proceed to call the next speaker
and be ready to step forward, please. One of the most confusing
aspects of this public comment period is a
state law that prevents us from responding to you. We can only
publicly discussed topics that are on the printed agenda. So while we get two and want to
hear your comments, we may not be able to reply to questions or
respond to the issues you raise. Believe me this is as
frustrating for us as it is for you. I will add that the Board may
decide to take a recess at some given point in the meeting. That is a right we have and we
may exercise it. Some of you may have signs,
which we fully understand and support. We only ask that you
keep in mind the safety of everyone here and that you not block the view of anyone behind
or around you. Finally there may be times that you are asked
to avoid a certain activity or action and you must obey these
requests. Again, this is for the safety of all and also so we
can all hear one another in a respectful manner. Thank you, again for adhering to
these simple but important rules. I believe we are now begin to
begin the public comment portion and I have asked the Board Vice
President Haslund to assist me tonight and calling on speakers. »: The first three speakers, Bob warned, Grace Wallace, and Julie
Rivera and that order. The first speaker is Bob Dorn.
»: Yes. My name my name is Bob Dorn and
I have lived in Santa Barbara since 1952. I am not going to
give you my age, but I am getting up there. I moved recently to Idaho
because some of the things that has been
happening with Santa Barbara has concerned me. But beyond that, I just had — I
am not going to get it out. In 2001, I was there at Santa
Barbara City College when we made a
flag. I don’t know if anybody remembered that. Very good.
But they made a flag colors in the stands. And the flag that I have here
has the Pledge of Allegiance written inside of it. .
(Applause) But it is God bless America and
on the back it has the Pledge of Allegiance. So anyway I have just saved to
the I don’t know why, but I think I know why now. It is important that we remember
our history and important that we
remember that oftentimes these days, maybe our education system, maybe our lackadaisical nature
of old people — »: We ask if you could please
address the Board rather than the audience
»: I am sorry. »: The timer — »: I have got 45 seconds. Like a shock clock in basketball
I will try to be brief and make a point or two. I am a teacher. I had applied at Santa Barbara
City College to teach the history and I also used to
teach elementary school and Jr. high school all the way up and I
wanted to teach in a bad way, but I finally went up to the Bay
Area and taught there. So I have about 10 seconds left
and I hope everybody understands how important this issue is to
each one of us, but (Applause) mainly our kids and grandkids.
. »: Grace Wallace? »: Good evening, President
Robert Miller, Board of Trustees, staff, and visitors and I come before you
very heavy hearted, shocked, up, flabbergasted that an American
citizen who lay his head down at night under the stars of freedom and arise each
morn and privilege walk in all its
benefits would be so ungrateful to dishonor this symbol of
freedom. Personally, but also to silence
others from saying the Pledge of Allegiance to old glory, our flag, our
country, America. Our flag was first brought about
June 1, 4777,. It will forever stand for
strength, freedom, justice, and yet faith
in God in which our nation was founded. When we stand to
pledge our allegiance to the flag, we put our hands
over our heart and we say with all our hearts we appreciate the freedom, we
appreciate the privileges and the peace
that our flag affords unto us. We also love our Constitution
that keeps us free. Our flag is a symbol of hope to
the world. People risk their lives, scale
walls, scale waters to come to the land
of the free and the home of the bright. We live in a society
where the use of the word racist is used for anything, anything that is ungodly,
unpatriotic, they use the word racism. I am going to tell you
about true racism. Racism is when you go into a store and you will not be way on even
after you ask for help and you see them waiting on someone else
Caucasian. Sure racism is finding out that
my son has been called the N-Word in
his new school. That is true racism »: You have 30 seconds
remaining. »: I would like to end by saying
we all rest under the banner of protection our brave soldiers that have
died for our freedom and I say to you this day, let it be said of us, of our
generation that when a nation teeters on the edge of
destruction, having lost the ancient path of truth and
righteousness, we answer the divine call to work
for its restoration and appeal to justice. I strongly urge you
to reinstate the Pledge of Allegiance to our nation. I say
this to the Board. »: Thank you. .
(Applause) »: The next speaker is Julie
Rivera and next up will be Phil Cochran’s
»: Good afternoon, board, President, thank you so much for
allowing us to come and speak and for honoring the communities
request to reinstate the pledge. One of my favorite parts of the
Pledge of Allegiance is the last line,
“Indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. ” And saying a house divided
can’t stand and divided us our nation
is weak but together, we are strong. And so I am making an appeal for
unity and the decisions that you make, would you consider unity
being something that we should all aspire to? One of the quotes that is
actually on the yard of John F. Kennedy’s boat is, “Where we go
one, we go all.” And I think that is something we should
aspire to. Thank you. »: Thank you,. .
(Applause) »: Bill Cochran is the next
speaker and next up is Daniel and=gin8 »: My name is Phil Conran
»: Sorry. My mistake. »: What that young lady said is
exactly what I was going to say. I plead with you as a totally
nonpartisan, I won’t read the letter I was going to state
because she has already stated it. Reinstate the Pledge of
Allegiance before every meeting that we
have open to the public. Thank you. .
(Applause) »: Next speaker is Daniel Igen
and next up is Jeremy Purvis »: Trustees of Santa Barbara
City College, thank you for opening
up this forum to hear from the community. I am here as an
alumni of Santa Barbara City College 2000, 2001,
2002, so it has been a while. I appreciate your time. Today on trial is the Pledge of Allegiance, “I pledge allegiance
to the flag of United States of America and to the Republic for which it
stands, one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and
justice for all. ” The Pledge is a declaration,
a commitment, and is a dream. The declaration is that we are
at nation under God. The commitment is that we commit
to being one nation that can’t be
divided. The dream is liberty and justice
for all. Within this pledge we challenge
one another regularly to live a dream. We commit to stand together and
remind one another that we are
indivisible. We cannot and will not be
divided and we declare that we are under God. In the Pledge we express our
dreams and values, liberty and justice for all, every age, every race, every
one. Perhaps some do not dream this dream or respect the
Republic that we enjoy. It is there constitutional right to stand silent, to speak, to Neil,
to sit and listen. Freedom is a beautiful,
cherished privilege here in United States. Perhaps America’s greatest
dreamer, Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. said it best in his
famous last speech, has last words, “I have been to the
mountaintop.” You can YouTube it. He said this, “Always say to
America is be true to what you said on paper. ” We need not destroy the paper
. Thank you, so much »: Thank you.
(Applause) »: Next speaker is Jeremy
Purvis and next up is Steven Penner,
Steven Penner »: Ladies and gentlemen, of the Board my name is Jeremy Purvis
and I am a combat veteran of the Iraq war.
(Applause) During my time in Iraq, I was
honored to serve with brothers and sisters
who had ancestry of all races, colors,
and creeds. Some of us are here today
because Pledge of Allegiance of the American flag has been recently
criticized as a racist and white supremacist. And our current
poisonous political comment, climate we believe it is
important to protect what is still true and what is still of
value. It is true that every flag
represents something. What is it the American flag represents that merits our
allegiance? I pledge allegiance to this flag because it flies for men like
John Lawrence who, while fighting in the American
revolution it, “That Americans could not contend with good
grace or liberty until they ended slavery. ” On August 27, 1782, when
Lawrence was fatally knocked off his horse by a British musket
ball, he died fighting under this flag. I pledge allegiance
to this flag because it stood against and defeated the
Confederate stars and bars and it did so because of the blood
that hundreds of thousands of men shed fighting for the North
in order to do so. On July 18, 1863, when Robert
Fuller — »: 30 seconds remaining — »: Died with his men it was
while flying the American flag against the Confederate flag. I
pledge allegiance to this flag with the military salute or with
my hand over my heart because in 1942 the
American flag was designed to be different than the salute the
Nazis gave to there. This is why pledging allegiance
to the American flag and what is stands for is so valuable and I ask this board
not to throw that away. . (Applause) »: Steven Penner is the
next speaker in next up will be
Caroline Abbachi
»: Ladies and gentlemen, — »: Eating this microphone —
okay. »: Ladies and gentlemen, of the
Board, happy Valentine’s Day Day. My name is Steven Penner. I graduated from the United
States Naval Academy in 1971. I volunteered for combat during
Vietnam in 1972. I am honored to have fired the
last shot of the Vietnam War on January 28, 1973.
(Applause) I pledge allegiance to the flag
of the United States because when Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his fellow protesters
marched in 1964, they carried the American flag. When thugs protested against Dr.
King and his followers and tried to intimidate them and
physically assault them, those thugs carried the Confederate
flag. Today, has recently as August
12, 2017, neo-Nazi white supremacist thugs held a rally
in Charlottesville, Virginia. If you look at the photograph of
that rally, you will see that those
thugs carried the Nazi flag and the Confederate flag. If these same Nazi flags were to
show up with their thugs in Santa
Barbara, California my friends and I will be there to stand
against them and we will be standing under the Stars &
Stripes. The Pledge of Allegiance was first authored by Captain George
Hatcher Balch, a Union veteran of the American Civil War. If
you do not believe we are a nation under God, know that this flag
represents principles that protect your rights do not
believe. »: 30 seconds remaining
»: And that is why the Pledge is voluntary and everyone
has a right not to say it. But some of us want to say it
just like our parents and our grandparents. Each time in history it has been
those risking their lives under the American flag who have stood against and
defeated white supremacist. My fellow veterans and I are
committed to and raise — risk our lives
to defend this flag and what it stands for. We believe in
liberty and justice for all and forced stopping those who don’t.
That is what this flag stands for and I ask this board not to
throw it away. Thank you. (Applause) »: Thank you. »: Next speaker is Caroline
Abbachi and next up will be Lorraine
Woodworth. »: Members of the Santa Barbara
City College Board of Trustees, thank you for allowing me to
speak with you. To countless people in our country as well as
around the world, our flag has been a symbol of freedom from
tyrants and the liberty to live without fear and in peace and
security. To my mother, grandmother, aunt
and uncle, the site of that American flag meant everything. It meant that they had survived
the war in Nazi Germany and that they would live. They were
overjoyed with relief at the site of the American soldiers in
the streets carrying that red white and blue flag. Yes, they speak with a strong
German accent, but in their hearts and minds, they are 100%
American. Our flag is a symbol of unity
for our country and saying the Pledge of Allegiance is the
outward demonstration of that, which is intangible,
patriotism. Recently; however, on the political left, there
seems to be the idea that our flag and the Pledge of
Allegiance is racist and that the phrase, “One nation under God” is somehow offensive. People who think this feel they
should not have to say the Pledge of Allegiance. Of course, you cannot force
someone to pledge allegiance to something. That must be done voluntarily or
it to the purpose. However, to those people, I
would respectfully ask a question:
Where would our country be without our flag
to inspire a of Americans to all of the ideals that have made our
country as peaceful and prosperous and as
enduring as she has been and where would my mother,
grandmother, aunts and uncles be without the flag around which
our brave and selfless military rallied around the cause of
saving the lives of people they would never know or ever even
meet? Please always say the Pledge of Allegiance at every
meeting of the Board of Trustees. Thank you for
allowing me to speak with you and each person listening, have
a good afternoon »: Thank you.
(Applause) »: Next speaker is Lorraine
Woodworth and the next speaker up will be Tammy Bolley
»: Thank you, trustees and president and I am here
representing several students, parents and alumni who have
asked me to come speak on the Pledge of Allegiance and why we
should continue having it. With replace our hand on our
heart we pledge allegiance to the flag is a free country, as a
free people and I was going to say a lot of stuff, but a lot of
wonderful people have already said what I was going to say so
I am going to talk personally. I personally immigrated to this
country years ago and became a United States citizen. At my
swearing in ceremony, I was so proud and honored, as were
thousands of other people standing in that room to pledge
allegiance to the flag of United States. That meant it’s a contract, it’s
a promise to uphold the laws of the United States’ Constitution,
the Bill of Rights, and even the Constitution of California. And
as we did that, our hearts filled with pride. It meant we were secure, we were
free. It’s the only country on this earth where we seek to be united as a
whole unit, as a one people and by
standing and saying the Pledge of Allegiance, we affirm that
and that is why it is important for every meeting for public
officials and including what I think of when you were given
your oath of office, you pledge allegiance to the Constitution
and the state of California Constitution and the Bill of
Rights and part of it also required the
Pledge of Allegiance. So what I would like to say is
public officials should begin each
public meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance. And if any of
you refuse to uphold your public office —
»: 20 seconds remaining — »: The United States
constitution and the California Constitution you must resign
because when you gave that oath you pledged you would uphold the
laws of this country and there are no
laws — of their actually case law I found that says a public
meeting should begin with the Pledge of Allegiance so;
therefore, I ask you to please say and
affirm the Pledge of Allegiance for each of your meetings.
Thank you »: Thank you.
(Applause) »: Next speaker Tammy
Bolley and next up will be Peggy Wilson.
»: Good afternoon. My name is Tammy Bolley and I
graduated from Santa Barbara City College. California is now
35th out of 50 states and education, less than a third of
our fourth fourth-graders are proficient in math and reading. One third of our Californians
are on welfare and that budget is 103 billion of our state
budget. California is now home to
134,000 homeless people and many of the immigrants who migrate to hear
have no high school education. 60 6. for billion of the state budget
goes to education and 302 billion is
unfunded public pension liabilities. 31% of residents
in California and our pain hundred% of the taxes and the
top 1% now pays 40%. The Board of Trustees use their position
of authority to preach bigotry and hatred toward a country that
takes the most refugees of any nation, gives the most money,
physical and human labor around the globe. Every nation around the globe
and throughout history has had a history of racism and
oppression. This year way to end up back in the dark ages of history is through
a lack of education a political indoctrination where religion is
removed and God rights excised from the public square. Of all the issues confronting
public universities today, the attack on the lack of Freedom of
Speech, religion, and of the free exchange of ideas
should be paramount. Atheist are incorrect on the intent of
separation of church and state. Thomas Jefferson hope to avoid
theocracies such as the reign of the Catholic Church in Europe,
but felt that speech and religion and freedom thereof
were intertwined. The professors at Santa Barbara are
well-paid. They have healthcare and they
have pensions. »: 20 seconds remaining »: You have left the taxpayers
with $136 billion in unfunded liability spirit that is
privileged. University professors live on our hard work
hatred toward white race so division of hatred among our
students and that is not education. Jesus said I will remove the
stick in my eye if you remove the log in your spare as a
graduate of Santa Barbara City College, I am greatly
disappointed in your lack of support of a nation that has
over the years is supported you with so many ways.
(Applause) I am tired. I am very tired of hearing about
white privilege in my universities and frankly, may it
is time to stop funding you because you really don’t
appreciate it and perhaps need to go home. .
(Applause) »: You might recall that I
said before we started public comments that we weren’t going
to have interruptions by noise or speaking or whatever. So I really would humbly request
that you not clap during speaker comments. Thank you. »: Next speaker is Peggy Wilson
»: No. I am Linda Bonnet. We kind of got mixed up your. I am a native son a Barbie being
and I amen this speaker before me and I will add to that.
There is a lot of anti-americanism taught, anti-Christian-ism
taught it that is a word and anti-Semitism. And those three things are very
disturbing to all of us. I am here to represent a
gentleman who just turned 95 years old two
days ago. His name is Lou Bass. My father Neil Bonnet met him
when they were in in World War II in
early 1942 and a enlisted in the
Marine Corps as aviators. They both served in the Pacific theater against the Japanese . And Lou was shot down in the
Pacific theater and fortunately for him his band of Brothers was
able to rescue him. And he also served with my
father in Korea. And my father was shot down in Korea and the same thing happened, he
was rescued by his other patriots serving as well. But
Lou went on to serve in Vietnam also and I honor anybody here
who served in any of the wars, even back to
World War II — oh, my gosh I am almost done — and I want to stand with Lou Bass and Celeste and most of
the people here against the audacious and arbitrary and unauthorized
actions of Mr. Robert Miller and we know you can do better than
this. Thank you. . (Applause) »: Peggy Wilson, are you Peggy?
»: Yes, I am. »: Next up is Laurie Punches
»: Okay. My name is Peggy Wilson and I’m a native of
California and I have resided in Santa Barbara, California for
the past 50 years. I am a former student at Santa Barbara
City College and have a great love for the institution at Santa Barbara
City College. Thank you, trustees for the public service
you has performed to steward the college and listen to public
comments. I am very appreciative of your efforts. Two weeks ago local and national
news zeroed in on Santa Barbara, California particularly Santa
Barbara City College over a controversy involving the unilateral decision by newly
elected SBCC board Trustee President Robert Miller to not
recite the Pledge of Allegiance at SBCC Trustee board
meetings. In his e-mail to Celeste Barber
Mr. Miller states and I quote, “I
assume full responsibility for the decision not to recite the
Pledge of Allegiance and a little further on I quote, “I
had discovered that the Pledge of Allegiance has a history
steeped in expressions of nativism and white nationalism.”
While I understand Mr. Miller has his personal
opinions, I think it extremely devious that he would use his
Trustee President position to further his own personal
political agenda. This is evidenced by the fact
that Mr. Miller acted on his own accord and failed to involve others in his
decision. Furthermore a true leader in the best interest of Santa Barbara City
College is students »: 30 seconds remaining
»: Thank you, would welcome the opinions of other board
members before making the decision not to recite the
Pledge of Allegiance. Symbolically the Pledge and flag
is near and dear to many of us and at the very heart of being
American. This unilateral decision leaves no doubt in my
mind that Mr. Miller is not qualified to be
the SBCC Trustee board president and I call for his resignation.
I have a few more minutes. With liberty and justice for all.
Those words from the Pledge of Allegiance do not belong to a
particular party, a particular race, create or ethnicity. The
Pledge of Allegiance belongs to all Americans and it symbolizes
unity, solidarity and agreement that we are one nation under God, America.
Thank you,. (Applause) »: Next speaker is Laurie Punches and up next is
Gloria Bucheck »: My name is Laurie Punches and
I ran for Santa Barbara City College Board of Trustees this last fall and
for Kate’s position and I really loved getting to know all of you
during the debates and forums, but I have to tell you I’m
really disappointed. When I was a little kid, you
know we always said the Pledge of Allegiance. I was dyslexic
and I could not figure out east, West, North and South but I
always knew where the flag was every single grade I went into
and I took a lot of solace putting my hand over my heart
and saying the Pledge of Allegiance. When I was in 3rd grade, I got
my wisdom teeth pulled, actually 5th grade a pair remember the one thing I
did, I forgot. I just believed that the United States of
America is founded on some very, very basic principles and I want
to read to you the Declaration of Independence because when I
watched on YouTube what happened to Celeste Barber who was just
an instructor for 20 years of English in Santa Barbara City
College, what really ripped me up and what then just
disappointed and embarrassed me and made me ashamed of the Board
is that none of you stood up with her and said
the Pledge of Allegiance and I was going to join you. I am
sad. But I want to read this and this is why I am standing
here. In the Declaration of Independence it says when in the
course of human events it becomes necessary for one people
to dissolve the public bands, which connects them and assumes
power separate and equal to the laws of nature and God’s nature
and them to a decent respect to the opinions of mankind
»: 30 seconds remaining »: We hold these truths to
be self-evident. All men are created equal and
they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable
rights. That life and liberty and The Pursuit of Happyness.
When a long train of abuses reduces them under absolute
despotism it is their right in their duty to throw off such
government and to provide guards for the future security, which
is what we are doing here for Santa
Barbara City College students. Thank you. .
(Applause) »: Thank you. »: Next speaker is Gloria
Bucheck and next up will be Celeste Barber.
»: Thank you to the Board for allowing us to have this
period to speak. I’m very happy not to see a
bunch of students hanging around with big signs behind you. I
too was very unhappy with what I saw at that meeting. I am a long resident of Santa
Barbara. I have been a future business woman and I’m a parent
and a patriot and I would like to ask a question. You have had
many wonderful comments, but I ask what is it that binds us
together? Most of us are immigrants, grandchildren of
immigrants, and have come here from someplace else. We come
from a different country, different governments, different
histories, different races and different ethnicities and
different religious patterns, but we come here and
we call ourselves Americans. But what makes us un-American? Well, to me an American is being
a citizen of these United States. It is a country that
grew from the dreams of common men and women to one day be free from lives
determined by cash, religious affiliation, accident of birth
on a social ladder are some other form of predestination.
And for centuries the common man has dreamed of a place of
freedom and opportunity where he or she could pursue his or her
own dreams and ambitions. These dreams have given life on this
continent by some very special people who shared a vision of
liberty for everyone that would come here and of just responsible
self-government. I so to that end they created a constitution
and bill of Rights that is unparalleled.
»: 30 seconds remaining »: And they hope that
future generations would defend and protect the public and
founding documents. The American flag represents our
founding, are Constitution, our bill of Rights, are best ideals
and our sacrifices of so many who died to defend them and us
spirit choosing to remove the Pledge of the flag that is the symbol of our republic and all
that we stand for is a grave mistake. It shows a
misunderstanding of what the flag represents to Americans.
We know our history isn’t perfect, but we also know that
we strive for more perfect union of liberty and justice for all
and we recommit ourselves to that every time we say that in a
public place. Thank you. (Applause) »: Next speaker is Celeste
Barber and next up will be Michael
Aaron Woody. »: My name is Celeste Barber and
I’m pretty certain everybody knows where I stand on the
Pledge of Allegiance. I would first like to say I am
wearing a remember poppy today and that is in honor of our
precious veterans who are standing here with us today.
Thank you, gentlemen and ladies for that. When I was thinking
about what I would say today, it occurred to me that there is
really one primary underlying reason why we freely recite the Pledge
in this country. And that is because we love and
file devotion for this country. That is why we recite the
Pledge. There is another word for those
kinds of people. They are called patriots. All of you sitting up there are
patriots. Everyone who has filled this
auditorium today is a patriot and that is why we recite our
pledge because we love this country so much. It is precious
to us. I would also like to add one other thing. Of all the countries in the
world, passed and present, there is no
other country that is more deserving of these patriots than America and I
would just like to say on Valentine’s Day,
“I love you, America. Thank you,.” .
(Applause) »: Thank you. Next speaker Michael Aaron Woody
and next up will be Grace Wallace »: My name is Woody Wilde. I
May 20-year veteran of the U.S. Army and I am for the flag and I
salute the flag. Most of my comments will be
personal. During my 20 years of service in
the U.S. Army I first went to Korea, just
after the fighting stopped there and
then I went twice to Vietnam and served
my country. That is 20 years in my lifetime,
my family’s lifetime spent in the service of the country and
the flag is a big part of that. I would like to read a very
brief statement by General Omar
Bradley, of five-star general of World War II. General Omar
Bradley argues that the attacks on the crosses like the
attacks on our flag must be fought. He notes in brief to the spring
that among other things he is the recipient of, not only the middle of
honor, but this distinguished service Cross
and six distinguished flying Cross all in the shape of a
cross. These arguments that we have about the flag and the Pledge are all connected and we need to
be defending these symbols of our
patriotism. »: 30 seconds remaining »: I find nothing in this pledge (Applause) that is white nationalism or
racist. »: Grace Wallace, are you here?
Grace? »: And next up will be Denise
Spangler Adams? »: I am not sure I am next
because my name is Grace Woody and I
heard Wallace. »: It says Wallace. Grace
Wallace? It says grace Wallace. Is there a grace Wallace here?
»: Please go ahead »: I believe she spoke very
early on. First of all, I am delighted
that so many people here have stood up
and said the things that are in my heart. I came to this country from a
dictator in Guatemala. I also lived in Spain under a dictator in Spain . My husband served for 20
years and so did my four children as well as
I did. And we moved 20 times in those
17 years. What I’m trying to say is there was a lot of sacrifice that went into protecting what we are right now
arguing. I am appalled because after
hearing all of this I could feel my
temperature rise that Mr. Miller had actually gone in
name-calling. Always when I taught conflict resolution, you always start
with, “I feel. ” Not, “You did this and you
did that.” And here you have. It is racism. It is white nationalism and it
is divisiveness. That divisiveness is something I did
not see in those 20 years in the military. We lived altogether, whatever
race we were. We went to chapels. We either did or
didn’t go. It was a choice. And actually, I am afraid for
what is happening now. I am 86 years old now and I
never thought that I would see people
pitted against one another by color.
»: 30 seconds remaining. »: And so I am more afraid of
what all of you are doing by taking this stance. You didn’t
vote for it or anything. You arbitrarily now have become,
in my estimation, and autocrat,
someone that believes that you have it all right. You don’t. So please consider the sacrifice
because freedom is not free. I have seen more division in the
last five years and I don’t blame it
on Trump either. The divisiveness is political. .
(Applause) »: I am sorry but I am going to
ask everybody, we will get through this sooner and we will
be able to hear everybody, hear them all clearly
if we don’t clap either during or after the comments. So if you could help us with
that — (Comment off mic) »: The next speaker is Denise Spangler Adams and next up will
be Linda Bonnet. »: Before I start I wanted to
ask a technical question. You had said you were taking general
public comment before you took comments on the flag. My
understanding on procedural grounds was that you are having
two public comment sessions. I have cleared that with your attorney, Craig Price, let the
record show that the trustees are being represented by
Thornburgh at this meeting and I was told you had two public
comments. I also want to put on the record
for Mr. Miller that I view it an act of discrimination that when
you have people there that were aligned with your social agenda,
you gave every speaker five minutes, even though I had to
sit through them holding a sign for five minutes and saying
absolutely nothing. And I have been to your meetings. I also want to thank Jonathan
today for standing for the flag. I noticed last week he sat for
the flag and apparently, you play, you are politician and you
play your audience and you have an audience today. So I’m watching my clock and
that is my procedural question and hopefully, your attorney can
respond. That is a point of order.
»: Excuse me. I will respond to your comment. We
have public comment right now. This public comment —
»: Stop the clock, please. »: Your comments period,
this comment period will be immediately followed by
consideration of the resolution concerning the Pledge of
Allegiance. We are having one comment period and that comment
period is right now »: Okay, well, your attorney
told me there will be two. I have a general comment slip
and for demographics about the immigration act of 1965 and how
it changed America and how we need to unite it. I have a
general comment slip for that and I have a second general
comment slip in for the flag. You allowed five minutes for the
other speakers and I expect to be given five minutes like them
if, in fact, you choose to have two minutes, than I expect you
to coordinate with your attorney before a meeting to
clarify what the ground rules are because I play by the rules
»: You have 30 seconds remaining. »: So in my final 30 seconds I
will tell you the goal is to unite. I think you all
collectively should be ashamed of yourself or your behavior at
past meetings. I think Jonathan, you should
give us an expiration for why when there is a crowd to stand
for the Pledge and you don’t otherwise. I am the great of
the man who carried the flag for the battles of Gettysburg in
Antietam. People died. Abraham Lincoln’s birthday was
celebrated on Tuesday. I hope you will read the Gettysburg
address and what it stands for. I hope you will understand what America is and I hope you will
learn to appreciate that you would not be sitting up there if
it wasn’t for all of us. (Applause) »: Next speaker is Geoff Bono and next up after
Geoff will be Janine Robles Wright
»: Could I have Council address the comments about the
public comment period? »: I would be happy to do that
Mr. President. First of all, I just heard someone shout out, “Point of order” from
the crowd and as the case may be in
a meeting such as this, points of
order are only allowed to be taken or
exercised by members of your board. But in response to Mr. Adams
comment, she is correct. And, as you know, on every agenda,
you have ordinarily first and item
that allows the public to comment on issues
that are not otherwise on the agenda. And I know that today because so
many speakers are here to talk about the Pledge that it was determined to
take the public comments on the
Pledge so that those people could be heard
first and not caused to have to wait
and to delay. And so that is my understanding regarding the public comments
that you are taking now and, of course,
subsequently in the meeting, you will be allowing public comments, one
comment on a non-agenda item, per speaker,
that people wish to express. So I hope that clarifies the
situation »: It does not. This is an
accommodation issue? (Gavel)
»: Excuse me. (Comment off mic) »: Okay, we are going to
proceed. »: I am asking for public
accommodation. »: And I am asking for the
audience to sit down and listen to the speakers who will now
continue. Thank you. »: No, I will not. I have a
right to public accommodations and you are
denying that. Ask your attorney »: Do you wish to take a
brief recess so that we can attempt to serve the member of
the audience? If not, then please go ahead and
proceed and when you get to a recess, we will deal with the issue that is
being raised and as Chairman Miller indicated, there should
not be any shout outs or disruptions as the speakers
proceed. Thank you, Mr. Chairman
»: Thank you, Council (Comment off mic) »: I would ask you —
»: What I am saying is the president is about to indicate
that by your continuing to speak up, with all due respect, you
are out of order and we are going to attempt to deal
with your issue when the Board takes a break. So please let all of these
people who are here to speak make their
comments. Thank you, very much for your attention.
»: Okay. Please proceed »: My name is Geoff Bailey
and I must confess when I first heard about this — thank you —
»: Just told one minute while we reset the clock.
»: I won’t take too long. But I must confess when I heard
about this, I bunch of questions came to my mind like where it this idea
like eliminating the Pledge of Allegiance come from. It has
been with me for all my life and it never has been a problem.
Was somebody offended by it? Is this a high priority item?
Aren’t there more important things to do then this Pledge of
Allegiance and so I feel like the whole way
I operate in life is if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. And to the Board feel that the
Pledge of Allegiance is something broken that needs to
be fixed and these are my comments
»: Thank you. Next speaker, please.
»: Janine Robles Wright is next and follow will be Linda Seal it
looks like. »: Are those speakers here? »: Is Janine Robles Wright here?
Okay. Janine Robles Wright . Janine Robles Wright, are you
here? No? Okay. Linda Seal? And next up is Gary Villaba
»: Good afternoon. My name is Linda Seal and I live
above the city City College. And I am a retired attorney with
the Santa Barbara colony counsel’s
office. I am a senior deputy and I have
sat in on a lot a board meetings and advised a lot a board
meetings and done what your attorney has done. I am pierced to speak about what
happened last week related to the pledge. I never thought I
would see something like that happen in Santa
Barbara. I received a question about it
from someone on the other side of the country. I just checked
today. 4 million people have looked at
the scene where Celeste was speaking and was interrupted and it was
embarrassing. It is embarrassing for us. I am very practical and I am
asking that as a board you take a look at what happened and take a look at what
is happening to the students. The students feel strongly
enough that they have enough power and authority over you
that they can get behind you and try to intimidate you and bully
you and making you to look at what they are being taught. I
think you need to look at the teachers who are supporting this
and encouraging it. When kids stop and when kids try
to speak over you, they are usually five years old.
»: 30 seconds remaining. »: And so it is very disturbing
to see not only the kids, and I’m calling them kids because
they are kids. They have no life experience. It shows. The thing is it is supposed to
be the transition between the families and real life and real
life is not going to put up with that. They are not going to get
jobs. They will have a lot of problems in life if you don’t
set of standards higher and not allow kids to
think that the school belongs to them. It does not. It belongs
to the taxpayers. It belongs to the people whose
names are on the buildings. It belongs to the people who are teaching without all of the
money — »: You have to wrap up. Your
time is up. »: All the grants they have
available to them, they would not be here without that. .
(Applause) »: Geoff Bailey is a next
speaker and after that is Gary Bialba.
»: Thank you, very much. I am proud to be six generation
Santa Barbara. I graduated in 1965 and also
from USB and I was very proud to serve in the U.S. Army and the
Vietnam War and in respect to my brothers and sisters that served in country, I served in the
Republic China, Taiwan and a support capacity. I would like
to inform you and make sure you understand that the Pledge of
Allegiance is codified by federal law. It is United States code title
for, chapter 1, Section 4 and the
pledge in the manner a delivery and I do have a copy of that for
you. I will leave it on the table as I leave. For the last 10 years my broken
heart for the last 10 years that is currently going on today in
this country is our country is besieged by an attack on the rule of law, on our
institutions, and our sacred traditions, absolutely under a sale and a lot of it comes
from academia, from a compliant press of a certain political
party and I will simply say to you today and this will be brief
that if the Pledge of Allegiance to this great country, the
greatest country in the history of mankind, the most prosperous and the most
generous, if the Pledge of Allegiance is
somehow offensive to you or obscene, I respectfully request
that you step down from your position as a board member.
Thank you. (Applause) (Cheers and applause) »: Next speaker is David
Madagen. I going to ask — I’m going to
ask one more time that we not have comments, clapping,
comments, cheering from the crowd while we had speakers and
we will get through this a lot sooner and hear from everybody
if you can abide by that rule. Thank you »: The speaker is David Madagen
and the next person will be Aaron
Sebon. »: I will be very short. I am
David Madagen. I’m probably best known in town
is a scoutmaster. I just was very shocked — well
I am a little bit right of center. But I am so shocked at the
comments you made and how far to the left
the Board is. I believe in diversity. I don’t care what
gender or color people are, but you need diversity of opinion on
that board. I can’t believe that no one on
the Board resisted your edict to the
Pledge of Allegiance. And it took a retired adjunct
Professor to bravely come forward and challenge you. We need a board that reflects
our community and reflects our diversity. We need some
conservative voices on your board. I don’t care if you resign and
make a space for someone to take charge of the Board, but you
need to mix it up a little bit. This is ridiculous. This is all
I have to say. . (Cheers and applause) »: Horace Woody Wilde is next. Okay. Betsy Cleans? Betsy Cleary? Okay. I’m sorry.
What is your name? (Comment off mic)
»: Okay, good. »: Thank you for hearing me. I
am probably the only person who is going to speak on your
behalf. I support your action up to a
point. If the people in this audience that hated the flag, at least the red
part of you, I don’t have a problem with
that. If the red part of the flag bothers you, it doesn’t bother me, but
it bothers you. Something bothers me. I am a teacher, I have taught in
the Army. We all went to City College.
My sons or taught there that Richard Nixon was responsible
for the war. I kind of thought you would have somewhat of a
jurisdiction over what the teachers did. My son also wrote
in English class an essay , pick a topic, get on one side
or the other. He picked a topic on gun control. He was against
gun control. He got a D. I said Peter, you
screwed up. I did not see any criticisms of
his grammar on the whole thing. It was beautifully written. But
it was the wrong thing. It was the wrong side to be on. So I think I need to say to you
that the middle of the far, far left isn’t the middle. And if the teachers, professors
wish to be on the far, far left, it is perfectly acceptable to do
that, but I won’t protect and defend that as much as I would
rather protect the interest of the flag. So as board members again thanks
for hearing me. But consider the far far left is
not the middle. . (Applause) »: Betsy Rabb Perry and followed by
Leanne Semento. »: I love my country. I am an
Army brat and my dad served for and a half years of my life in Vietnam, two tours, one in
Korea. Long ago I memorize something and this is what came
to me. And it is a song that we use to be able to sing. States. If you know it, you can
say it with me. We the people It would come on the airwaves,
the preamble of the United in order to form a more perfect
union establish justice, to ensure the domestic tranquility,
provide for the common defense, promote general welfare and to
ensure the blessings of liberty for ourselves and our posterity,
to ordain and establish this Constitution of the United
States of America our pledge is a symbol
of a republic and all that it stands for. It is not racist. When I was in 4th grade, I was
one of five kids in an all Black school. I moved 23 times before I turned
18. I love my country, my brother,
two star general has served — he
was right under general betray us. We have watched what is going on
in this nation. It is just the saddest thing to my heart that
you people have chosen to believe the lie, the lie from
the pit of hell. This country is founded on
freedom, founded on God and I stand
behind her with all my blood in my body thank you. .
(Applause) »: Leanne Semento and followed
by James Thickner. »: Thank you for letting us
speak today in a safe place, an orderly place. My family has been here since
1953. I graduated also from City College and so did my son
and I’m also a teacher. I have a vested interest in our community, schools and I was
alarmed when the Pledge had been banned from public meetings. We encourage pride in our
families. There is a lot of pride and
individual heritage, our city, our college. We have fight songs and mottos
and not our country? The country, which gives us more freedom has been stated than any
other. No one is forced to say it, but you want to prevent us from
affirming liberty and justice for all. That is very curious
to me. Santa Barbara City College’s
vision says you want to create a
socially conscious community where knowledge and respect and — empower
individuals. Your core principles include
free exchange of ideas across a diversity of learners and there
is no longer any diversity. And when there is diversity, it
is often shouted down and put down or not invited to speak on
our campuses. I don’t think eliminating the
Pledge accomplishes any of your goals. Last month’s meeting on this
subject, it disrespected diverse ideas
and the community that supports this college. I encourage the
Board to model respect for our freedoms. We are teachers as we said and
for diverse ideas, including
appropriate patriotism by permanently reinstating the
Pledge. I encourage you to model free
and open exchange of ideas by maintaining
order, by creating a safe environment as you did today,
respect and learning do not occur when students are allowed
to disrupt meetings and mock individuals with whom they
disagree, or when a group is allowed to dominate the room
with signs without even participating
in any of the discussions. I hope that future Santa Barbara
City College draws national attention because her students
have learned to bring respect and order to the free exchange of ideas represented in our
great country. Thank you. . (Applause) »: James Thickner followed by
Toni Credawski. »: Before I begin I want to
start on this Valentine’s Day by telling all of you speakers I
absolutely want you to be my Valentine, so much wonderful
love. My name is James Thickner and
for the last decade my wife and I have contributed significant money to
the SBCC foundation. President Miller, I question your fitness to be a SBCC Trustee.
The Pledge is not, as many speakers have mentioned, races, nativist,
or white nationalist. Where you have gotten that vile
revisionist poison and why you were unable to expel it with rational critical thought is anyone’s
guess. Let me provide the Cliff Notes. The Pledge’s 31 words are a
great cultural touchstone of American ideal. They pay homage to the enormous
sacrifices made. The Pledge is an aspirational
message for everyone’s future to form an even more perfect union.
Mr. Miller I don’t request that you
recite the Pledge yourself. This is not a pop quiz. You
don’t have to say the words. It is not compelled speech. I ask only that the Pledge not
to be banished so that others are free to stand up, put their
hands over their heart and say with dignity and
love. My final thoughts. If a publicly funded institution
cannot protect fundamental Freedom of Speech and ensure, as others
have mentioned, diversity of thought, I really don’t know
what business you are in. Whatever you are doing in
forming division and discontent, I for
one have no interest in subsidizing it. Thank you. .
(Cheers and applause) »: Next speaker is Toni
Credawski and then followed by Dennis Peterson.
»: This is addressed to the Board and to Mr. Miller. There is nothing in the Pledge
that is racist or White privilege. I am White okay? I
don’t have — I don’t think I have privilege. You tell me
what special advantage, right, or benefit I have over any other
person or class that you call me so privilege? I also am not a
racist, but you tell me how I discriminated or think
I am superior over another person. When or where did I do
these things? Do you have any answers? Know you don’t. You
can’t. But you throw out this radical
leftist garbage of yours that is pure hate speech. It is pitting
one group against another. How can you classify all Whites
with privilege and racism? Also, now I understand there is
a new privilege, Asians now are privileged. Who is next on your list? Mr.
Miller, on the first meeting of the Board, why don’t — you
wanted to get rid of the Pledge. He couldn’t wait to tell America
all about White privilege and White racism. Mr. Miller, you are a hardcore
leftist hater. City College deserves a better leader. Mr. Miller should be fired. We want a leader to bring us
together and not separate us. Please keep the Pledge. Thank
you. . (Cheers and applause) »: Dennis Peterson followed by
Louise McCabe . »: In a temporary move to remove
a public right of a social meeting
with — with lawyers has now passed. Sanity has been
restored and for that I think the full board. The flag is
very important to all of us, always always. Let me give you two sentences
that Oh, say can you see, by the dawn’s explain where we are
going here. early light, what so proudly we
hailed at the twilight last gleaming,
think about those two sentences. We are talking about night and
day and things are going on. The British are shooting
cannonballs at us for over 24 hours straight and that flag never went down once,
not once. But wait a minute, cannonballs
are big, they take out flagpoles. What held it up?
The people held it up. We held it up. That is what happened
and we are not going to forget that. All right. It is amazing! We have earned that right to
speak freely by the symbol that reminds us of it. Our flag and our pledge
reaffirms the events of September the 13th , 1814. Regardless the flag was
there and today I and my friends will pledge once again our
allegiance to the Republic for which it stands. Thank you. .
(Cheers and applause) »: Denise McCabe followed by
Judy Whiting. »: Hi! My mother’s family emigrated
from Mexico in the early 1900s and my father’s side of the
family from northern Italy and also in the
early 1900s. My family has been in Santa
Barbara since 1914. I brought a bunch of pictures because if anybody ever wanted to know
how many parts of the world really want to come to the United States become
citizens, work hard, be in coal mines,
come from Italy and work in chorizo families, all the
different things, being poor, my family
did not come here rich. They came here to become Americans. I grew up in a home where some
members spoke Spanish, Italian, and
English and we all blended . It is an important part of
being here and we are proud to be Americans. We didn’t let go of our
heritage, but we blended in with us — this
one. Glad to be here. (Applause) »: Julie Whiting. Followed by Natalie Tang. »: I am a native Santa Barbarian
and I was born here in the hospital and I’m shocked. The education system was always
good here in Santa Barbara. Recently history has been
rewritten in California. The schools have gone down in
national standings. The academic learning of the
students has gone down and now we are
taking apart the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag. My family, all the men in my
family, my husband, all of my brothers served in the military and they respected
it. They respected the flag. They respected the Pledge of allegiance and it is in no way
racist or detrimental to anyone. It is a spirit of unity and
patriotism and to say that the Pledge of
Allegiance should not happen with your
board, I find repellent. This is not right. Hate is not something that
should be taught in schools. Respect is something that should
be taught in schools and seems to
be sadly lacking. And I suggest that you think
about where your salaries come from. They come from hard
people who pay taxes and those taxes pay your
salaries yet we are considered bad White
people? Or bad Patriots? And the Pledge of Allegiance is
not appreciated and; therefore, you don’t feel you have to say
it. Please reinstate the Pledge and
stand up for America. (Cheers and applause) »: Jubilee Tang is next followed by
Joe Dennally. »: Thank you, Board of Trustees.
I was not planning to speak, but I feel really privileged to
speak because I am in this land of freedom, of religion and
speech. I was born in Taiwan and I moved
to Indonesia when I was four and a
half and lived there 10 years and entered the US for high
school and I was very privileged to put my hand over my heart and
pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States because it
guarantees freedom for all, equal freedom
for all, Liberty and justice for all. When I was in Indonesia, just by
walking on the streets, I was actually hit a by people who were a
different color than I was. I lived in the homes and I had
to listen to Muslim whatever every
morning, how many times a day? We had no rights to do anything,
but the United States Constitution, because it is so strong, the US is the
strongest nation in the country so I am not here to be at a, say this and that,
but we need to realize the facts that
what is it guaranteed under the Constitution is at liberty and justice for all,
whether you like it or not, it is one nation under God and that
is what has been provided for all of us so we are very
grateful even to have this meeting right here. It is
because you have a strong constitution. So regardless of your views, the
Constitution is here and we have to respect it. Thank you. .
(Applause) »: Joe Dennally followed by Mike Cleary. »: Members of the Board, my name
is Joe Dennally and I have lived on
the Mesa for 45 years and in that 45
years I have really seen a lot of changes at Santa Barbara City College;
however, I never ever thought that I would read of a decision to eliminate the
Pledge that prompted this meeting. I am an Army veteran and I serve
under that flag for five years,
actually, I thought under it for two and I
do not think the Pledge represents
nativism or White nationalism at all. Now I know, and I know people of
many races and ethnicities who are proud to salute our flag and
recite the Pledge. And I am not just talking about
veterans groups. Even the local chapter of the
antique automobile club of America asks
me as a veteran to read the Pledge at
every monthly meeting. And believe me I’m am very proud
to do so. Now we know that no one is
required to recite the Pledge and although I am proud to stand and say the
Pledge, those who prefer to sit on their hands
are certainly within their rights to do so. I have no quarrel with that;
however, I do think that most Americans
strongly support reciting the Pledge of allegiance at public
meetings and gatherings and; therefore, I
would request that it be made a permanent part of the Board’s
agenda. Thank you. . (Applause) »: Mike Cleary is next followed
by Julie Vishaw. »: It is popular today in some
circles to say that we are not an exceptional country. We are an exceptional country,
an extremely exceptional country.
After World War II and where we lost hundreds of thousands of
people and wounded millions more, what did
we do? Something no country has ever
done before. We reached out to our defeat in
foes and lifted them up by the bootstraps with the Marsha plan. That is exceptionalism beyond
all beliefs. We loaned them billions of
dollars and as I remember only one country ever paid us back, the Netherlands on another thought, I noticed
that politicians are very happy on
every place, from Bernie Sanders, to
Donald Trump to Mr. Roosevelt, anybody, when they
are campaigning. They always have the flag behind them. It is set a proper tone. I never saw your campaign, if there were
one, but afterwards when they bullets start to fly, figuratively or
imaginatively, or real, may be don’t stand next
to it quite so close. I think that having the Pledge of
Allegiance. »: 20 seconds remaining. »: In your meeting sets a tone that you are standing by that
flag, that exceptional country that hundreds of thousands have
given their lives to protect. I think that the gentleman who graduated in 1991, I don’t know
his name gave an exceptional performance,
the true meaning of that pledge. Thank you, again, were he is.
. (Applause)
»: Thank you. Julie Vishaw followed by Douglas Scott.
»: Board of Trustees, thank you very much for allowing us to
come here today and speak. Most people have already said what I
have already written so I’m going to delve into something very
personal to me. My parents gave me and my brother a gift, a gift of two people that
they sponsored in 1957, refugees from Hungary, from my aunt and uncle
to be, I learned about communism. I learned that they
left Hungary when the Russians invaded. They gave up everything to be
here . They became US citizens.
They moved in with us. I didn’t know what I was pledging about
when I was a little girl, but I learned. I honor them, my uncle helped
put the moon buggy on the moon. Neither one of them spoke
English when they came here, but boy did they
understand what this country was about. I would like to ask you if all
of the students who go to City College would be willing to die for our right to
speak, our right of free speech, as so many in this room be are willing to do. If they are not being taught,
taught how precious our country is, how
much it needs protecting, our Constitution and bill of Rights
are unique. There are other democracies in the world, but
they are not like ours. I ask you to respect and to
educate everyone on what this country
truly is. Thank you. (Applause)
»: Thank you. »: Douglas Scott followed by
Grace Wilde. »: The principles contained in
our Pledge of Allegiance and our Constitution and bill of Rights are what make us an exceptional
country. Our God-given rights and ideals know thou shalt not murder, thou
shalt not kill, thou shalt not commit
adultery or bear false witness, those are enshrined in our laws and are
more as a people. There are many countries around the world were life is cheap and
women are second-class citizens, where you are guilty until proven innocent. Those are the things that make
this an exceptional country. And if our young people aren’t
learning these lessons, I think it is a failure of our education system.
You are responsible for educating these young people and I think that if you don’t
believe in these principals , I just don’t think you should
be on the Board of a public body. Thank you. .
(Applause) »: Thank you. Grace Wilde?
Is Grace Wilde here? (Comment off mic)
Okay. William Bruner to be followed by
Dave Branson. William Bruner? Followed by Dave Branson.
»: Good afternoon, Mr. Chairman, Members of the Board , it is my opinion that there is
a hidden agenda in all of this . And I think it is the further
removal of any mention of God in the public square. Looking back through the pages
of the nation’s past when truth becomes obviously clear,
historically God cannot be separated from America. The first settlement on the
shores of New England in the 17th century the colony, based their governing
document, the Mayflower contract on the God Almighty and no
uncertain terms. Generations onward, when the
colonies could no longer bear the yoke of the mother country,
these 13 colonies came together and agreed as one to be separated from England, the
Spirit of 76 produced the Declaration of Independence. Any reading of that document
clearly shows an of God. The nation was forged in the
crucible of revolution in the darkest days of that struggle in the snow of
Valley Forge, the General of the Army knelt down and prayed to God, asking
for strength, success, and victory. The framers of our Constitution
almost without exception in their various writings acknowledge God, the
writings of the founding fathers revealed they are people of
faith and did not hide their convictions. These few examples do not even
amount. »: 30 seconds remaining.
»: In the mountain of evidence of Dede being in our
institution. A day will come where we all
will be standing in front of the Creator at which point some can
explain to him in person why he doesn’t exist. Others of us
will bow down and express our gratitude for his hand upon
America and thank him for the blessings he has showered upon
this nation. »: Thank you.
(Cheers and applause) »: Dave Branson is next followed
by Maryann Shapiro.
»: Thank you, very much. This is very heavy stuff. Do I
have time for a shot at? My youngest son’s girlfriend who
goes to City College, her family has
a 6-year-old adopted younger
brother who said do you say the Pledge of Allegiance and the
City College classes? And he said that is not a real
school (Laughter)
Carrying on. This is and educational
experience and we will learn an acronym today.
KAYHALL. It will put into perspective how most of our college, public boards
and directors operate out of a
certain set and framework, KAYHALL. Robert Miller’s job
would be best performed by deleting biases that label the
traditional foundational tradition like the Pledge of
Allegiance as something perverse. The Pledge of
Allegiance fosters camaraderie and reminds us of the community
of liberty and justice and has made the US a great nation that
millions are desperate to enter. Nothing is gained by such
tactics. They are destructive and create conflict. But Mr.
Miller has been empowered by this. The US left is well-defined by
this acronym KHA, keep eight alive. They
attack institutes by some sin of the past that is totally
irrelevant today. Good Americans, no good
Americans embrace or tolerate hateful attitudes out of the past or now, but
Miller’s left won’t let that go there
fueled by KHA. They have hate speech that counters the idea of
ideology. »: 30 seconds remaining.
»: To invent the accusations based on some past aberration only
proves the KHA acronym, keep ATE alive and falsely saying the
pledge is perverse. And Trustee Miller’s job definition is to
set aside personal feelings and protect the school. This is denigrate and keeps the
KHA alive. I encourage Trustee Miller that
you can — the Pledge does not
establish religion and it does not violate amendment number 1
so tolerate it. Remember tolerance? It does not
disparage anyone. It is much more, but to you it
can be just a historical. Don’t be destructive for a false
premise, be tolerant. . (Applause) »: Thank you. Marianne Shapiro is next
followed by John Church. Marianne, are you here? John
Church would be next. Followed by Anne Sprecker.
Okay. Anne Sprecker is next. »: Thank you for allowing
me to speak here and I hope this is being filmed to be shown to
all of the young people of what is going on here today. And I wanted to say that I am a
command sergeant major, retired. I have been in Iraq and Bosnia
and many places, but when I was a young soldier, a naïve teenager coming
out of Santa Barbara I went to Fort Polk Louisiana for basic training in
1964 and on our way home to Santa Barbara we were all
wearing the same uniform and we got off to eat at a restaurant and
they would not serve a black soldier. All of us got back on that bus
and we refused to establish or go in
that establishment. And the reason we did is because
we were now all Americans, under
this flag that we pledged allegiance to and an injustice will need dealt
with as it was in the ’60s . And the flag that we have
today is all our cultures, all our
religions, and all of us are interwoven. It is the fabric of our life and
it holds us all together. It unites us together.
»: 30 seconds remaining. »: Okay. And I would hope the Board would
keep the Pledge of allegiance and not listen to that White guy
or whoever he was, the racist person who wouldn’t serve the soldiers. That is an anomaly and I think
that what is happening is kind of the same thing in a different
way. So thank you for listening to me and God bless America. .
(Applause) »: Thank you. Anne Sprecker is next followed
by our last speaker unless I have somebody else in the other pile, Reta Sullivan
»: I am Anne Sprecker. I feel like I got here from
another planet. With the person I would like to thank his doctor
Miller for the job he is doing and all of the Board members.
President Beebe is doing a great job and I would like to remind
the audience that they actually believe in democracy. That all
of these people were elected freely by the community. They
were not appointed and they are not here for their own glory.
So thank you. And I was made to say the Pledge
of Allegiance from kindergarten to 7th grade and I suddenly started to
question what it was. It was meaningless be forced to
say something. And when I switched schools
instead of saying the Pledge of Allegiance we actually studied
Civics and I believe this is an educational facility. It is an
institution to teach. It is not military. It is not a Congress.
It is not here to pass laws and we should really pick our
battles and think about why we say the Pledge of Allegiance.
It probably does not need to be said here. What we probably should say is
our mission. It is far more appropriate. The world is not
going to fall apart and people are not going to become godless
and hate the country because they don’t say the Pledge of
Allegiance. People are free to say it if they want to. It is
right here. So thank you and let us continue
to be an educational institution not a political and dividing
one. »: Thank you. »: Finally Reta Sullivan.
»: Hello. Thank you for listening. I just want to say
as a side note, your voice reminds me — you
know that all talkshow “password” like I want to hear
you say, “The password is…” I love it. But anyway thank you
for listening. I love you. You are not alone. All words of
declaration. When you love someone, what do you do? You
declare it outwardly. I love you. There is power in the
words we declare and we declare the things that matter to us. We hold these truths to be
self-evident. I have a dream. As not what your country can do
for you, but what you can do for your country. I pledge allegiance to the flag
of the United States unified states for every citizen of
America and to the Republic — what is the Republic? It is our
home, for which it stands, one nation under God. In the Bible
says that God is love. So under God you are declaring one nation
under love. Declaring that there is more to life than just
what we can see in this day today. Indivisible, undivided,
unified, standing strong together with liberty, freedom to be who God has
created you to be in your uniqueness. Than justice for
all, justice for who? Whether you are Black, Asian,
White, Native American, Eastern Indian, LGBTQ, young or old, our
Pledge of Allegiance declares all these things, all these
things we hold true to our hearts as Americans. If we
remove this Pledge of Allegiance we say we do not believe in
these things. We do not stand for those things
here in Santa Barbara. »: 30 seconds remaining.
»: We pledge allegiance to this flag in the Bible says that
God is love so what do you say? Do you want a nation of love?
Do you stand for your brothers and sisters of every background,
every walk of life? I do. We stand as one nation under God
and we proclaim it and we declare it out of our mouths
just like you declare I love you. I am with you. You are
not alone. I pledge allegiance that we are one nation under
God. . (Applause) »: Did I miss someone who wanted
to speak on this issue? Did you fill out the script?
»: Yes, I did. A »: What is your name? »: My name is Gary Bandum.
Thank you for allowing us to speak today. Discrimination by race, by skin
color, not acceptable. It is not acceptable with
prefixes or suffixes. It is not acceptable being pro
or con, not within our human race. We are one race, many colors.
The White only soda fountains our history, good riddance. Somehow it has become okay to
have Black only words . For some reason enunciating
the word n***** is, okay, if my skin is dark enough. Discrimination in any context is
divisive and wrong. My goal is to have equality of
opportunity, equality and everything. Thank you. .
(Applause) »: Mr. Chairman, do you
want to take up the resolution first or should be go to the
other? (Comment off mic) Your call.
»: Go ahead. »: My name is Jen. We are talking about the
meaning of the flag. What is the flag? It is a symbol. It is not meaningless. It is
meaningful. You might think of the iconic image out of World War II, hero Jima, struggling to carry up the
American flag. That has meaning. That is what we are in our
culture. Just some background that we can
all relate to. I grew up in Chicago when it was a crazy
ethnic community. It was not a big city it was a
lot of little communities. There was signage and all
different languages. And we competed one with
another. We came together when we went to high school. Because they you had people,
different ethnic backgrounds coming
together and we identified with a high school
playing football, playing basketball,
plane baseball. The symbol of the school flag was unifying element. We were altogether. That is what the flag does for
us. And I would like to bring up a painting, a copy of which I just
got by an artist called Schwartz. He spells his last name SCHARTZ.
»: 30 seconds remaining. »: He paints the American
flag with the vertical stripes down. You have a sailing ship,
the sale is full-blown, leaving a harbor,
choppy water, turbulent water. The background is hazy as the
skyline of a city, may New York City. The title of that painting is
called “HOPE” and the boat is a sailing
the culture, into the future through
all of these troubled waters and that is where we are right now.
That is all I am going to. »: Thank you. .
(Applause) »: Okay. We move to general topics that
are not on the agenda. (Comment off mic) »: Counsel ? I would recommend that you
complete this agenda item regarding the
Pledge meaning to take up the resolution, which is before you and only after
that, then take comments —
(Comment off mic) »: You say we don’t get to say
anything? »: I am very sorry. That is the
recommendation. The comments have been made on an agenda
item. You are taking up the agenda
item at this time. My recommendation, if you choose to
follow it is to finish the agenda item before moving on.
(Comment off mic) »: Excuse me. We will call all of the rest of
the speakers who filled out speaker forms as soon as we go through the
resolution on the agenda. (Comment off mic) »: So thank you. If you
could please… We are now going to take up the
Pledge of Allegiance resolution. We will now turn to Item 4.1
(Comment off mic) (Comment off mic) »: Point of order. »: We are now going to turn to
Item 4.1 the Pledge of Allegiance. Please…
(Gavel) (Comment off mic) »: Out of order. Out of
order. (Comment off mic) »: We will take a recess.
»: Out of order. I will ask you — »: I do believe we need to
take a brief recess. »: Wait. Trustee Miller, before
we take the recess, I do think it is very important that we
address what was just said at the podium . And I would appreciate — I don’t know if you want to
address it, Trustee Miller, but we do recognize as a board that
everybody has a right to come to that podium and say what they
are going to say. But it is so distracting, so offensive, and
it makes it hard for me to move forward with this discussion of
the Pledge of Allegiance. So I would appreciate if we take a
recess now. But I think there are a number of us on the Board
who feel that way. And I don’t think we can let that kind of speech slide by.
»: I have to state the fact that Crystal was gobbled up but not
that gentleman was very offensive. — was gaveled
»: Sorry. We are on a recess right now. Five minutes. »: Can we have everybody be
seated, please ? (Gavel) Would everybody be seated? So I think, and I will take my
share of blame for this. I think there has been some
confusion about what order we are doing the items tonight. But what we are going to do now
is we have 18 speakers who have submitted slips. We are going
to continue and finish with all those speakers before we go back to the Pledge resolution. So if we could call those
speakers? Trustee Haslund? »: The first speaker is DJ Weiss followed by Carol Meachum Landis. »: Gail Meachum Landis? Are you
here? »: Okay. You keep going. »: Sherry Holland? Are you
here? »: Sherry Holland here? »: »: John Bucheck
»: Okay. Who is next. »: Chris Nordin?
»: Okay. I saw a hand raise back there, followed by Linda Seals.
(Comment off mic) »: This is for general public. »: Hello. I am a former
student and community member. I have no advocacy for the Pledge
either way. I’m here to support the students who protested the return to work of
Ms. Mass in the Board process reactions, which I think were
tone deaf. Attending SBCC allowed me to
attend a university and succeed an opportunities that would
otherwise not be available to me and I am extremely grateful
for that. During my time here I was able to gain viable skills.
Growing up in the neighborhood I was thought of SBCC as something
to aspire to. It was where I wanted to go when I was little
so I thought of you as a destination even before I knew
what it was and beyond that. In short, your institution really
means a great deal to me. My experience was inspiring and
rewarding, but it was not universal. I felt safe, included, and
furry, free to pursue my goals at the number 1 community
college in the nation, but that is not the case for all
students, especially students of color. Many Black students have
come to this board and told them of their
experience of racism. They need action. I want them to have the
same experience as I had. They deserve that. This President
and Board of Trustees have continually demonstrated that
they lack the will to make substantive strides towards that
goal. I want the SBCC that doesn’t
just take credit for being welcoming and supportive of a
diverse student body, but that actually does.
»: 30 seconds remaining. »: Promise I would like the ombudsman to be
a person that is appointed and should be approved by as many
campus constituents as possible with a track record of her doing
just so complainants can trust in them and they know it would
be a good faith advocate. If you appoint someone who is a
neutral party it is just going to reinforce the status quo and
the students cannot trust that and it will just make your job
easier and we need better than that and you can do better than
that. . (Applause) »: Linda Seals is next and them Gail Landis is next.
(Comment off mic) »: We are going along the
two minute rule and following that.
(Comment off mic) »: It will be at least 20
minutes by the time we are done. (Comment off mic.)
»: Excuse us, please. Excuse us. (Gavel) Please sit down. Out of
order. Please sit down. »: Linda Seals.
»: Yes,. Please don’t start the clock until I have the
floor. »: Go ahead.
»: Okay. As I mentioned earlier I am
Linda Seals and I am an attorney, retired Santa Barbara
City Council and I put in two slips. One for general comment
and one for the issue on the Pledge and what I wanted to say
here is that what we were seen earlier, although the
students are upset, they need to understand that their behavior
is being watched by lots of people, people who are
investing, people who have chosen not to go to the fundraiser in April or what The Foundation is having because
they will give their money to UCSB, and
other, and other place or feel like they are getting better education and they are not
allowing the students to run things. Because they are here,
the students are here to learn. They are to be educated. We want them to enjoy their
experience here, but not to turn this into
a free-for-all. And it is embarrassing for the
people who say they are not going to subsidize any more of
this. You’ve got to think about that. What is going to happen
to the school? Where are these kids going to go to school if
the school can’t withstand all of this? So I am being very practical and
saying about what you are doing, educate these kids on how they should be
protesting, have some self-control, and act with some
maturity. Tell the teachers to do the same thing because you
can’t have instructors screaming, yelling, pounding,
acting like little kids and then expect
the public. »: 30 seconds remaining.
»: Who wants to give donations, a million dollars or
more to help these kids get a good education decide
to give this money to West lot. That is the concern that I have.
The image of the school is right out of there and we don’t want
to have people get the wrong impression just because of a dozen kids who
think that they have the right to disrupt things. Thank you.
. (Applause) »: Gail Landis is next followed by
Gage Englander. »: So I have been hearing about unrest about the students and
what happened with the staff member
and I just feel like there has been months and months that have passed and I
think at last coming up with an idea or a
way to bridge this issue and satisfy
students and faculty and staff is wonderful and I support the ombudsman program. And I think it has taken a
really long time and what we are seen are students who feel that
they haven’t been heard. And I think their frustration is
boiling over and I kind of don’t blame them because I think they
feel like no one has heard of them. And so I am happy that at
long last there is some action being taken. Thank you.
»: Thank you. Next speaker? »: Next speaker is Gage
Englander and followed by Gary Vandermann.
»: Hello. My name is Gage Englander and I
am a 16-year-old middle college student here on campus and before people
think that there are only aged conservatives here. I would
like to say that is wrong. I am a 16-year-old conservative
Jewish person. Which makes me about the same
level as a slave owner apparently. So I would like to
say that is much that people think because of my race and my
quote-unquote lack of systematic oppression against me that my
point is invalid. That is fair. Everyone has a struggle in their
own form, but the only form of struggle that should matter is
that only personal level, not that which you believe society
has put upon you. You are at a free college giving you a free
education and quite frankly, I sites if anything it is
promoting your ideals more than it is hindering it. A teacher, Lyndsay Maas made a
stupid choice of murder — words at an equity conference. She
was out for your own good and she misspoke and said something
that I will admit was foolish and dumb. She should not have
said that, but that is all it was. It was a mistake. It was
nothing more, nothing less so for you guys to come up here and
act like you have seen the course of life and act like you
have seen oppression just know that you are not helping your
case. I struggle is something like when I had to come here for days after
my dad died transitioning from a standard high school. That is a
struggle on an individual level. Name one time a teacher or
anyone has come up to you because of your race. I doubt
ever. And if they have, they should be fired. If someone
comes up to you and bullies’ you for your race on campus they
should be kicked off campus — »: 30 seconds remaining.
»: , but I believe that is campus policy because of someone
believes you, they are jerks and that is what they are. I would
like to leave with one quote, “If you teach your child in a
clean room is entire childhood, when he leaves, the common cold
will kill him. All you are doing is making students feel
prepared for real-life. Making students that are ill
prepared for and and echo chamber in a state that is
already the epitome of an echo chamber. By removing the Pledge
and hammering these intersectional fallacies, you
are not helping them. You are ruining them. .
(Cheers and applause) »: Gary Vandermann? Is he
here? Okay. Barbara Parmett followed by Crisita Silvers Crisita Silvers follows Barbara.
Is Crisita Silvers here? Okay, good. »: I would like to yield my
time. »: We don’t allow yielding of
time. I am sorry. »: You allowed a lot of speakers
— »: I am sorry. »: You will not gavel me.
»: You are out of order. »: You let all of the
speakers go out of order. You let people come when they’re
names were not being calls you can let her yield her time. We
had to sit through all of those speakers, here all of that
racism. You can start the clock »: You are out of order.
Please call the next speaker »: No. Somebody say something.
You let all of those people come up and talk when their names were
being called. (Comment off mic) »: You are out of order.
»: So you are going to do this, Robert, today. All of
this racism that I’m talking about and all of the injustices
of Black students, the very reason I was not on the Board
because I was gaveled and pushed out, the very reason because I was pushed out as a Black woman,
I was sexually harassed by SBCC end nobody cares. And now you going to gavel me?
»: You are out of order. »: I am out of order?
»: Yes, you are. »: None of you are out of order
ever? It out of order? And you are disrespectful too.
Arrogant? You are a racist »: I think you have had your two
minutes. »: All of you coming here today.
Do you know how hard it is it? Do know know even how long ago
you have been to SBCC? Do know this
— the hardships that students face at SBCC? Do you know
anything to help low income a disenfranchised underprivileged
students? »: You are out of order.
»: You don’t know. »: Do I hear a motion to declare
out of order? »: I am out of order? Really? But you let all the other
speakers speak? »: Point of order.
»: This is my two minutes —
»: Point of order. Point of order.
»: Mr. President, if I may — Mr. President, if I may, the correct procedure — the correct
procedure, having determined that the speaker is out of order is to warn the
speaker that unless you immediately cease
this, we will entertain the motion to have her removed. That is in accordance with your
rules and you have given her adequate
warning. — (Overlapping speakers) »: Do I hear —
(Comment off mic) »: Point of order. You have
been ruled out of order. Do I hear a motion to declare
her out of order? »: I make a motion. »: Is there a second?
»: Is there a discussion on the motion?
»: I second. »: We have a motion to declare
the speaker out of order. All those in favor say aye?
»: Aye »: Trustee Parker?
»: What I would like to know is while we don’t yield the floor
to other speakers, that we have been, I have noted during this
meeting that we have been allowing other speakers to come
forward. It would have very — very
simple for her to add her name to the speaker list. I don’t
know if she wants to do that at this point, but when a meeting
gets this disruptive and we cannot go on, we need to stop. And so I don’t know if we need
to rule one person, to have them
removed, or simply pause to give that person a little time to
leave leave. You know that is something that we could do as
well. »: I think the speaker at this point has removed herself to the
rear — »: Excuse me. I don’t
understand what is so hard about saying turn in the slip
right now. Why get confrontational with someone who
wants to address us? (Comment off mic.) »: I agree with you,
Crystal. I agree. But I think it is very simple and good for
the community to let her speak and let her turn in a form. It
will harm no one. It will harm no one.
(Comment off mic.) »: Do we have any other
discussion on the motion? (No response.) »: All those in favor of the
motion say aye? »: Aye
»: All those against? »: No.
»: Motion passes. »: The next speaker is Crisita Silvers . And Costas — I am trying to read — Aquinellos? Okay. Followed by Crisita Silvers.
»: Thank you. Good evening. My name is Crisita
Silvers and I’m not affiliated with the college, but I am a
resident of Santa Barbara County and a constituent. In reviewing
the coverage of recent campus happenings and watching previous
board meetings I have seen student after student along with
faculty and staff members meeting after meeting come to you all and genuine distress to
tell you about the consistent hostilities they face walking
through campus, going to the library, registering for
classes, and even in class. I can only imagine how difficult
it is to be on campus and focus on your studies under the
circumstances, on top of the usual stresses of academic life.
I would like to think the college is interested in supporting its
students and providing a positive learning environment
for all, to set up the students and the college as a whole for
success yet as far as I can tell, there has not been any genuine
investigation to address the original complaints from your
students and employees, whether this apparent lack of response
is due to oblivious or ineptitude or to
lack of transparency, or whether it is intentional to distract, thwart,
and intimidate. Whatever it is, it sends the
message that the affected students, staff, and faculty are
not valued members of the college community and I don’t
consideration or protection and that is just not right. And it
seems to me as a parent and a community member that may be
this institution is not a great option with which to entrust our
college bound loved ones. I encourage you to go back and
pass the 10 gentle transactions that have developed and really
address the original complaint about a hostile racial atmosphere and specific
race-based incidences around campus. So I support the request of
Black students, staff, faculty and allies from outside
independent entities to address harassment and discrimination
grievances including those the college was alerted to back in
November. Furthermore in order to be effective, this outside
person or agency must be chosen with input from the affected
student, staff, and faculty; otherwise, it just won’t work
and at risk becoming yet another source of division and
disappointment »: If you could wrap it up.
»: Thank you. »: Costas Aquinellos followed by
Dennis brand. »: Hi. My name is Costas Aquinellos. I
am a Santa Barbara resident. I am concerned about how people of
color have been treated on campus, especially over the last
couple of months and I’m here to support the two simple and reasonable request
made by SBCC students faculty and staff of color and their
allies. The need to be an external review Board or
ombudsman to look at the grievances of discrimination and
harassment at SBC and this is necessary to a pattern and lack
of follow-through for the administration and also to be
clear beyond this person, they must be selected in consultation
with impacted students, faculty and staff on campus. Selecting
someone that is not approved by the group making demands such as
the Ombuds meant onto today’s agenda is not an acceptable
response. Second the needs to be
meaningful antiracism training for all employees and a
long-term campus antiracism plan must be instituted at SBCC and
this means training for not just subsidy of employees, but all of
them. Thank you for your attention. »: Thank you. Next speaker?
»: Next speaker is Dennis brand followed by Scott Resnick.
»: Hi! I’m a member of the Santa
Barbara community and I value our community college. From a
community college I went on to get a graduate degree and I hope
this path can be available to any student who wants to learn
however I am disappointed in the direction the City College has
chosen to take it where it has seemed to be that the college is
failing to provide a safe inclusive environment for all
students went for example, the administration failed to take
seriously complaints that some students can’t study in the
library without being subjected to racial slurs. It shows the
administration is not protecting students’ physical safety or
emotional well-being. It is worries like this that up caused
several of my friends with children to plan on sending
their children elsewhere. One thing that indicates to me that
the administration is making a good-faith effort to protect all
students would be to hire an ombudsman experienced in working with
students from diverse backgrounds. The CV of one
person being considered for this person is sadly lacking in this
area. To consider someone without experience in the
specific issue facing the school shows either a lack of
understanding of the issue or a refusal to take
it seriously. And I want to echo the calls for
input from students affected in the hiring of the ombudsman.
Thank you. »: Thank you. »: Scott Ruskin, followed by
Mary Turley? »: My name is Scott Ruskin and I
am a Santa Barbara resident and have taken classes at SBCC. I am close to a lot of members
of the SBCC community. I have the privilege to be close to including members of color. I
have been concerned about how people of color have been
treated on campus, especially recently. I am a member of the local SURGE chapter and SURGE is showing up
for race justice. One of the things that is
important to SURJ’s accountability to people that
are effective by racism, people of color. So that means that we need to
listen to and take the lead from people
of color when they are brave enough to take the lead and speak up, like
crystal, the young woman who just spoke up in front of us. So I am here to support the two
simple and reasonable requests being
made by the SBC students, faculty, staff of color. First there needs to be external
review Board or ombudsman to process complaints and
grievances. Again, this is due to the
pattern, the lack of follow-through from administration administration,
the Ombuds person must be selected in consultation with
the faculty and students. We need to listen to and take the
lead from the people who are impacted by racism . Selecting someone who is not
approved by the group, who you decide for the group who you
think is best, that is not an acceptable solution.
»: You have 10 seconds left.
»: Second, the need to be meaningful antiracism training
for all employees and a long-term campus-wide antiracism
plan. Thank you. »: Thank you. Next speaker?
»: Mary Turley. Mary? »: Thank you for the opportunity
to speak. I am going to keep my comments short and I have also sent the Board,
the Trustee members of, and Dr. Beebe a longer piece of
information with a lot of information today by e-mail and I did not have
student Trustee Kenny Igbechi Igbechi’s e-mail so if you could get that to
Kenny, I would appreciate it. I’m a long resident of Santa
Barbara and I thank Dr. Beebe for all of the wonderful work
with the time he has been at the college. I wish you strength and healing.
I thank you for looking at the creation of the polyp — Promise
Program created by the SBC foundation. Thank you for the
programs that provide education for local
students that also benefit local employers. The idea of offering
more night classes and things that are helping away way for
students to balance employment while furthering their
education. There is a lot more that I attach, but I will read a basic outline in
regards to student housing based on my review of video meetings.
Housing is complicated. We have a tight housing market with a low vacancy rate along the south
coast, hence housing is very expensive here. A Santa Barbara
is a beautiful area and people want to live here. We don’t
have to promote it. The MESA is gorgeous and very desirable and
close to SBCC and no need to promote the specific
neighborhood over others for student living
as other areas have great benefits as well. Rents are higher on the Mesa.
They are lower on other areas of the campus campus —
»: 30 seconds remaining. »: — to public
transportation and the entire region and the college need to
focus on better transport options. The city is working on
a portable housing and the state is working
on a housing. Work with the city and the
county on housing and promote students
living in other areas of Santa Barbara. Please do not rule out
the support of a zoning overlay to help preserve neighborhoods and housing and
consider and continue to focus on the students. Thank you,
very much. »: Thank you. »: Next speaker is Steve Owen followed by Paige Miller. »: So I was not planning on
speaking. As you can see on the slip I was going to give my time
to someone else, but I have been so moved by the amount of hatred and anti-blackness that
this board has allowed that I figured I would use my time. So
I want to be very clear. These people here are a distraction. You as a board know that Black
students came to you in November talking about multiple incidences of
harassment and discrimination on campus. Some of you even came to meet
with Black students. You said you were listening. You watched them cry and you did
nothing. Then at the last board meeting,
three women come and talk about their
personal stories and you are split and adjusting? If we are
going to talk about veterans then we should also talk about
the fact that people of color,
particularly Black and Brown people are
overrepresented in our Armed Forces. We should also talk
about that when those people come back to this country that
they almost sacrificed their lives for, that they are not
welcomed, probably buy some of the people who are sitting here
in this audience. And then the fact that you would try to problem the ties a Black
student who talk to you with her story multiple times when you
did not asked to remove a man who shared a racial slur is despicable . What are you going to do for
our Black students — »: 30 seconds remaining.
»: — and why do we continually have to come here, risking our
jobs, risking our safety for you to
care about our Black students? Why ? Why? Why do you continually want us
to beg? . (Applause) »: Paige Miller? Followed by Anna Reed.
»: I actually came here today because the Ombuds was supposed
to be here and potentially talk about the ombudsman office. And I felt really strongly about
that because I am part time faculty
at SBCC. There are almost no full-time
minority faculty at SBCC I will point
out, but I also am a research — researcher
at UCSB and I have my doctorate in molecular biology. At the first meeting where ever
ever spoke, it was after these issues
begin. It was with the Academic Senate and I have to say they
certainly seem to respond to all of the comments
people were making. And that was in November. And
nothing has happened. Nothing has been done. And that we have
a room full of people talking for two hours about an
issue that doesn’t even really exist
and is a problem for our community at SBCC. It was a crisis created by a
poor decision it unilaterally made by a man who apparently
doesn’t understand how to talk to anybody else on the committee
he is on before he does something that might lead to bad
repercussions. And then you want to know why our students
might not feel safe on our campus? Who can they go to and talk to
and expect to listen to them? We have leaders —
»: 30 seconds remaining. »: — that don’t talk to
us. We have leaders that don’t respect us. We have leaders
that have heard our stories and have heard people crying. I
actually have no negative experience is at SBCC, but I hear the
stories from my students. I hear the plea for help and I
am crying and you people are doing nothing to actively help
them. I don’t care about your plans for the future. What are
you going to do today? You are putting them through another
trauma. You allowed these people to assume that students
with a problem at that meeting and that students of color had
anything to do with the decision to remove the Pledge. They had
nothing to do with it. Nothing. They were never asked. They
never said they were concerned about the Pledge of Allegiance
being said, never picked they came to a board meeting because
they wanted to silently protest the lack of response you have
had toward them and instead you let people believe that they
were yelling things at a woman who chose to talk about the
Pledge. They were not yelling. I will tell you.
»: I am sorry your time is up.
»: Our students never said anything about the Pledge in
that meeting. It was a faculty member who is in the audience
who was yelling at that woman. It was not any young person of
color or; otherwise, who was irresponsibly interacting with
that person »: Time is up. »: Our students have had a problem
and communicating with this board for months and they would
not listen to us. They have never had a meeting for us where
we all got to sit here and talk for two hours about our
feelings. Nobody is listening. »: You are out of order.
»: I know. You are out of order too because you are not
serving our community. »: Please sit down
»: You are creating problems is of serving us.
»: Anna Reed, is Anna Reed here?
»: Anna Reed is next. »: Please sit down. You are out
of order. »: You are failing us all
because we are supposed to be one community at City College.
I have worked here for 10 years and in the last year you have
destroyed my faith in in this institution. And it discussed
me that you would let these people come here and have two
hours. And you do not listen to our students. You do not listen —
(Overlapping speakers) »: Point of order.
»: I am sorry that you cannot open up.
»: Trustee Miller bring order to this meeting.
»: Do we have a motion to call this meeting out of order?
»: How can you not listen to us? Because I’m not
following your procedural rules? Your rules are garbage.
»: Our next speaker — »: You are using your rules to
protect yourself from the truth. You can hide behind that nice
long table with your pretty suits on and listen to these
people tell you over and over how hurt they are.
»: Is there a motion — »: Point of order. I move to
remove the speaker at. »: Do I hear a second?
»: You would rather have us thrown out.
»: Is there a second? »: I will second.
»: Robert Miller you should have taken responsibility. We
came to you and ask. »: There was a motion and a
second Mr. President »: You should apologize to the
students. »: Trustee Miller, Trustee
Haslund has seconded. »: I would appreciate an apology
to the students. »: Is there a second and a
motion? »: Any discussion?
»: I call for a vote. All those in favor? »: Aye »: Tercell Elliot
»: Point of order. We do need to do the no’s.
»: Let’s hear the no. »: No.
»: No. »: There are two no’s. »: Is our final speaker here ? Ray?
»: With the speaker please proceed? »: Actually, I would like to
thank President Miller for putting the Ombuds program on
the agenda for discussion and to think Trustee Haslund and
Trustee Croninger for the work that they did on the ad hoc ad
hoc committee on gender equity, sexual harassment, these were
good conversations on difficult subjects. I am totally
heartbroken by what I have seen tonight. This is just devastating for our
community. And I acknowledge that most of you on the Board
did not get elected to deal with systemic racism. But you are
and elected leader and people expect leadership in times of
crisis from their elected leaders. And the ombudsman program is
only the beginning. Meaningful racism, and when we say that we
are talking about not just sitting in a classroom hearing
someone speak for a while and checking the box. But real racism with real
mediation to heal what is going on on this campus. And I think that this board
needs to show some true leadership and what is
acceptable on this campus. And I know that some of you will say there are people on both sides
and some people say Freedom of Speech and some people say hate
speech, but this is not a left or right issue. It is something
that is the right thing to do. And I ask you to look into your
values and look at the students and see that the students are
crying before you, begging you to do something and
just try to listen to them. And don’t just take action based on
what you think is right, but really listen to them and hear
what they need and try to take action.
»: Thank you. »: Denise, I think this must be your —
»: Yes. I thought I heard you mention that we could speak
if we had put in a speaker slip and submit a speaker slip
later as, apparently, the man who made those comments did
»: Did you submit a speaker slip? »: I did not.
»: Then we should go to the next speaker with the slip.
»: That is Denise. »: It was my understanding that
the last speaker who made the offensive comment spoke without
a speaker slip. Is that, correct?
»: Know that is not correct.
»: So when you take a speaker is now or not?
»: As I said at the beginning of the meeting,
speaker slips need to be submitted at the start of the
meeting and we even gave extra time for people to do that
(Comment off mic) »: See — she submitted a second
slip. She has a right to speak. »: If we could ask you to
yield the microphone to the next speaker. Thank you.
»: Thank you. And trustees, I did fill out two
speaker slips. I want the public record to show that the
sheriff in attendance has stated that he refuses to keep any
order to the meeting unless it is called for by Chairman
Miller. He said there would be no
citizen’ arrest or no procedural judgment calls unless it was
instructed by Robert Miller. So I wanted you to know that.
Second, for the record I want to to know the clock has not been
run on other people giving public comment and third, want
the record to reflect that Thornburg is the attorney of
record today for the trustees, the same attorney that will be
going to Federal Court next week to represent
Santa Barbara Unified School District against communities or with just
communities against the community at large who was their
education.org. It appears to us there is a definite conflict of
interest. The reason why your meeting can
go in complete disarray is because of the conflict of
interest of Griffin and Thornburg representing both
parties. If you are involved in a federal lawsuit on one side for the
social justice voyeurs, some of us call them because they are unruly at your
meetings, then it is difficult, excuse me I have the floor, it
is difficult to represent the college and I think you would
know that as people of law, but that is an ethical issue. Third I wanted to point out that
the speaker who spoke to you is a biology teacher who
overstepped her time by about five minutes. She has written
into the channels and public comments that she would be
embarrassed to work for City College. Her public comments have been
reviewed. »: We will allow the speaker to
continue. (Comment off mic) »: The clock has not stopped.
May I say that every time I is — I am interrupted the clock needs to
stop stop — (Overlapping speakers)
»: Excuse me »: Excuse me Mr. Miller you are
doing dual standards. I am starry. »: We will give you extra time
at the end. Please continue »: Thank you. I want you to
know she is on the public record that she would be embarrassed to
work as City College for the behavior of the college.
Thirdly, or fourthly, whatever the number is now. I cannot
keep track. They did approach me during the recess to ask me
to say that we do not know each other. Her son mentored my son and I
think this has become big business, big business and I want you to know
that ideas will take over our college, the ideas will take
over our city. And ideas were take over our
country and it is time. You have said as trustees that
you would get a neutral party — »: You have gone over time.
Please wrap it up. »: Sorry. See I am leaving, but they stay
and you allow them to stay. And you won’t call order
»: Your time is up. Thank you.
(Comment off mic) »: Those are all the speaker
slips. »: Is there a spec? You can
continue. »: Thank you. I want to clarify
that once again Denise is misrepresenting the
truth. I did not tell her that we don’t know, which other. We
obviously do. She’s to come to every board meeting to complain
about something. So we do know each other. I ask her to stop
saying that she knows my opinions on various
issues when she does not. »: Excuse me. »: I want to comment here that we are here repeatedly,
meeting after meeting after meeting after meeting to try to
get this board to respond to the issue of racism
racism. Clearly there are people who don’t want you to do
that and so they have manufactured an issue around the
flag. But the issue really is and has
been four months the issue of racism on our campus and has
been for many years I might add. This is not the first time that students have been harassed
because of races incidences that have happened toward them, not
that they have committed. They are getting harassed
because of the racist behavior of others. When we had, and
many of you remembered this, when we had the
teepee issue years ago native students were called out in
their classroom by their teachers in front of the entire
class when that was reported,
absolutely nothing was done. And one of the primary students
who was facing this retaliation was
told to stop complaining. So if you need nuts and bolts,
which I don’t really think you do because every single one of
you know that what we are saying is true —
»: 20 seconds remaining. »: — but if you think you
need those back, you have them and you know what they are and I
might add to listen to your student Trustee because he is
giving you that information and there is a reason he sits on
that board and it is because of college, they need
the voice of students. I also want to remind you
»: Can you wrap up, please? »: I will. You are
shocking how many of the people who came here to profess
their devotion to the words liberty and justice for all,
they are perfectly happy to see that not apply to people of color.
»: That is all the speaker slips we have.
(Comment off mic) »: If we missed it, if you turn
in a slip, we will let you speak. »: Please apply the rules
equally .
»: Angie, do you remember a slip from Kyle ? »: Democracy is Missy — messy
— have you noticed? »: I am going as quickly as
I can hear, folks. »: We are going to allow you to
go ahead. »: Thank you. My name is Kyle Rasmussen and I
work as City College and I am a veteran of the United States.
I represent the veteran students on our campus and we had no idea
that the Pledge of Allegiance was said at the committee. We
were shocked that this was an issue that came about. I served about 300 students
altogether. And the students spread across
right to left and down the center. They are more shocked at the
fact that there has been no accountability
by our higher powers than anything else. These men and
women have fought for your country. They followed the
rules and regulations. What they said and the actions that they did were held accountable
to them. You are allowing staff on our
campus to incite, to raise people up in
a way that they see fit on both sides. The students of mine don’t feel
safe enough to speak on campus
anymore. They have teachers asking them what they think about this . They fear that their bias is
going to now be affected by their grade. Take this into
account. — »: 30 seconds remaining. »: — they are our students
too. You are letting our student body
down by not addressing these fundamental issues that have
been raised by our students on campus. I would be amiss if I did not
mention their voices here today because I told them not to come because it
would not look good for us. But I want to speak out for them
because it is your fault. It is your words and your actions that
have caused this issue. Thank you. .
(Applause) »: Okay. We will now turn to Item 4.1
Pledge of Allegiance resolution. Let me say it by introduction
that Dr. Beebe and several board members including myself decided
this item should be on today’s agenda for board action. I
support the resolution. I have not changed my views on the
Pledge, but the interest of the college comes first. The
controversy has been an unwelcome distraction from our
primary goals to educate students and maximize their
chances for success thus I welcome board consideration of the resolution,
which I will now read. Whereas Santa
Barbara City College is one of 114 publicly funded committee
college as California Whereas the California Community College
system was created to provide educational opportunities for residents of
all ages and beliefs without discrimination against protected classes and
with attention to the educational needs of the
communities where they are located and to disadvantaged
students residing there; Whereas education through teaching and learning is the
primary focus of the college, including, as a core principle
the “free exchange of ideas across a diversity of learners”
as well as the teaching of critical thinking and respectful
discourse without political or ideological
preference. Whereas historically since at least 1959 the Pledge
of Allegiance was not included at Board of Trustee
meetings; Whereas a request for a change to add the Pledge of
Allegiance at the beginning of Board meetings was made by a
local resident in July 2018, and thereafter the Pledge was added,
and then later removed from the
Board agenda without a discussion or decision by the
full Board or further public input; WHEREAS, since then Board
members have received further comments from the campus,
community members and others and the Board recognizes and
acknowledges that differing views have been expressed. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED,
that the agenda for the Governing Board of the Santa
Barbara Community College District will include recitation
of the Pledge of Allegiance unless and until a majority of the Board determines
otherwise pursuant to an agenda item at a noticed public meeting after
public comment; and RESOLVED, that the Pledge of Allegiance is
voluntary and no person attending the Board meeting is
required to state the Pledge of Allegiance. PASSED AND ADOPTED by the Board
of Trustees of the Santa Barbara Community College District this
14th day of February, 2019. Do I hear a motion to adopt the
resolution? »: There is a motion and a
second? »: Is there a motion? »: I moved to approve motion
number 8 is a religion — resolution to the Pledge at
board meetings »: Is there a second?
»: I second »: Is there a discussion?
»: Mr. President, Board of Trustees,
none of the students who are presented at this board, no
students who goes to SBCC was involved in the removal of the
Pledge of allegiance. I think it is important that we say that and I want to use this
platform to inform the good people of Santa Barbara that none of the students were
involved in the removal of the Pledge of Allegiance. Our students are American and we
resolve to have free speech. We are allowed to think freely
and none of my teachers have a great
of me wrongly for thinking in anyway I want to think. Racial
slurs are not allowed at SBCC and it is sad that it was said
here. We are taught to be better
leaders and really most of who we look up to
right now (Off mic), but saying that
it was okay to say that at any public meeting. It is hard and
not a good example for students represented on this
board. The Pledge of allegiance represents those noble Christian values.
We have nothing against it. We are not against America. We know that veterans fought and
died for us to be able to say this. We are not against it. Please I want to let the public
know that the Pledge of Allegiance was not removed by
students or any student at Santa Barbara City College and they
were not involved. None of the Black or White or
brown students were involved in removal of the Pledge of
Allegiance. Also, the Pledge of Allegiance represents the problem that is
faced by students at Santa Barbara City College. We have
students who go to class hungry. We have students who don’t know
where their next meal will come from. These are the issues that
are affecting our students and it is
sad that the Board is not just
removing the Pledge of Allegiance, but it is a decision
to make a permanent. This this is not an issue that affect
students. We have students that are homeless. Many don’t know
where the next meal will come from. That is the problem faced by
Santa Barbara City College. Think you for coming and we need
your support and please join us and join us as supporting our
students. They need you. We need good energy to fight. We need good energy to fight
housing inequality. We need you, please. Our students are
American. I’m speaking for them because they cannot all be here. But please our students are not
un-American. We love going to school. But the issues are on
campus and we need you to help us fight.
Thank you. . (Applause) »: Any other comments ?
(No response.) »: Is that my turn?
»: Trustee Abboud? »: I usually speak pretty
quickly, but I will slow it down a little bit. It is a little
bit difficult making the statement especially hearing so
many of the toxic comments as a
person of color and a first generation American. It is not
been easy to listen to some things said. I want to express my shame, not
the last speaker, but the last speaker in the previous session before the
recess said the N Word in a derogatory
manner and I did not hear a single person who espoused how
great America was and justice for all and only two board
members so I am ashamed for that. And hearing it said like that so
blasé really shook me. And the Board silencing the
Black woman once again made it clear that white supremacy is
alive and well in Santa Barbara. I want to start by reiterating
very clearly that this is a
resolution to add the Pledge after it hasn’t been on for 60
or 70 years. It is not to remove it. And we
are not removing the Pledge. We are adding the Pledge with this
resolution. We have never had to add it before and we are
adding it because three people ask us to. On the time — on the contrast
dozens and dozens and countless people have asked us to take action on the
issue of racism and sexism and xenophobia on campus and I’ve yet to see
action on the Board level as much as I am trying to. And I want to clarify that those
issues that we have experienced and not dealt with as a board
since last March are in no way tied to the Pledge issue. Those
happened at the same meeting, but they are nothing to do with
each other and I really want to say
not for myself, but for how the press has conflated the two and many
speakers have conflated the two and like Kinney, I want to clear
this issue up that the people who care about the Pledge and
that issue are literally a separate silo, a different place
than the people who are coming and telling us that this college needs to better serve
people of color and students of color. We
need to be way more engaged and serious about the issues with
our students of color, are women,
our LG P students of space. This is a distraction. These
are the issues that actually matter in the issues that I got
elected to solve. We are told that student success
is the number 1 goal of the Board. This has nothing to do
with student success. Most people speaking are not
students. Most people speaking were
students or faculty or students and staff pick they see the
day-to-day. And we need to take that more
seriously. We need to do way more. We need to — a lot of people
who came up and said liberty and justice for all and how great
our country is did not say a thing to make SBCC better at
accomplishing the goal of accomplishing at liberty and
justice for all. I heard nothing from a single
speaker who said yes, on the Pledge. They did not say
anything about cleaning up the issues at SBCC
or anywhere. So that, many of the speakers
spoke in a manner that engenders a noninclusive culture for our
students of color and having said that one again, I want to
acknowledge that this is a new addition to our agenda, a new, for 60, 70
years this is some time the first time that we actually put
it on and I want the Board to critically examine this because
that is what our mission is. Why are we putting it on? What
purpose is it serving? What goal is at accomplishing? Why
not a different introduction? I mean we got by without doing
it. Other governments do it and others don’t do it. Why can’t we say our board
vision and mission? There is a dozen different ways
to show your patriotism. There is one way. And us boating on this says it
is one way. Us as elected officials need to
stand up for the Constitution. That is the structure. Not the
flag. But again, part of me feels that
this, what happened today, the speakers in favor of this, it
makes me feel like it was an actually about the Pledge itself
or the values espoused in the Pledge. When you have a speaker that
White privilege does not exist or you have speakers saying
N-Word and when you have a Black woman being silenced or someone
saying they have to listen to a Muslim whatever, when you have people
believing this students coming to the Board to ask us to take action, it is hard to
believe this is actually justified. So even if I vote yes, on this
it is because I will do it with some conditions because it is very
clear that SBCC and in the United States there isn’t
liberty and justice for all. You are Black students, faculty
and staff coming to us and being marginalized on campus and not
listen to and to hear United States you
have Black Americans incarcerated at incredibly
higher rates than White citizens. You have United
States military going around the world starting wars and bombing
villages and not protecting their freedoms, but bombing and
killing people around the world. This country has never had
liberty and justice for all, never. And I don’t know if we
will ever get there. But we are working to get to there. But it
is a fool’s statement to say there is liberty and justice for
all in the United States of America or in Santa Barbara or
at Santa Barbara City College. And it has elevated one religion
over all others. Even though there is a plethora
of diversity and religion in the United States of America. To
close in moving forward with the Pledge, I request two things.
First at the end of the Pledge when it says liberty and justice
for all, I am going to do it. I don’t know if everybody will
do it, but I will say “some date” I have heard it many other places, but I will
add the words “Some-day” I have Freedom of Speech to say that.
Thank you, very much. Next I think it is good that the
resolution set it, but I think we need to say it at every meeting that
it is not — no one is obliged to say the Pledge and it is perfectly valid
to sit, Neil, stay silent or do anything, but I think we need to
reiterate that at every single meeting. You could say we are
going to do the Pledge, but you also have to say
no pressure, your patriotism, your
citizenship, your Americanism, it is question because you did
not say 31 words. And finally, I want to plead to
the Board to put this behind us and let’s get to the real work
of addressing the housing and food insecurity our students face, the racism and sexism they
face, the not perfect rates, the Zima
phobia, — xenophobia, homophobia, because that is what
our job is and we completely failed in that arena and so
let’s vote on this and get on with serving people we need to
actually serve. (Applause) »: Trustee Parker?
»: Thank you, Trustee Abboud and I will repeat what he
said. I do want to share for those of you who don’t know, this is my
fourth time at a board meeting. But I did serve for 12 years and
another board and at the beginning of each of those
meetings we stood up and said the Pledge of allegiance. And honestly, I did not think of
it is a hugely patriotic moment. It was a moment for that board
to remember that we serve the public. And it was for the Board to have
that time to remember that we were serving the public. And I
think I was a little bit naïve about it, both in some of the
comments tonight that were beautifully eloquent and some of
them were really terrible and hard to hear. And it was the
same. I am sorry I was unable to respond to all of them
e-mails that we got, but some of the e-mails we got were
absolutely vile and it was an eye-opener the way it can be
used to divide the people of this country. It was sad. But
I agree it has become a distraction and that we aren’t
able to get to the critical business of
the Board. And I would heartily support
what Trustee of has suggested although I believe that each of
us need to be able to say the Pledge in our own
way. What I would actually talk more
to is the process. I am, as you know, new to this
board and I don’t think it is an issue
that it is new with our current Board President and I highly respect you,
Trustee Miller, President Miller, and I know that your heart is absolutely in
the right place. There is a historical pattern
with this board that I am starting to
observe as I come on with a lack, both a
lack of the president seeking out input
from the Board and from the Board turning
back and giving input to the President. And so I hope that we use this
as an opportunity to reflect on what has historically happen with this
board and the role that the president plays and the role
that each of us play as board members and we have a chance
soon to come together to make some
changes so we can get to the business in a way
that it is productive. The next thing I would add is
that in essentially one meeting we have been able to put forward this
resolution of the governing board about Pledge of
Allegiance. I would ask that in our next
meeting after having discussed this for months and have people
come to us about this issue for months that we have a resolution
regarding racism and racism on campus and I hope that I would
find another board member to support me. .
(Applause) »: Any other final comments?
Trustee Nielsen? »: Your microphone is not on.
»: Okay. I don’t need to repeat what has been said by
other board members, but there was some of you who don’t come
to our meetings very often or maybe look at them. I heard people saying that
nothing has been done, nothing has been done and they may be
pretty much right. But there has been a lot being
done. There has been investigations
conducted an ongoing investigations. We don’t have
all the results to display in public yet. These things take a
little bit of time. Santa Barbara City College is like
most educational institutions and especially Santa Barbara
City College. They were a very transparent for
of government. We believe in complete transparency and in
fact it is almost like managing by committee. It is almost hard to make
decisions and then proceed, but when we
write new policy, it goes through three different boards on campus and procedures
and procedures. It doesn’t happen real fast, but
it also doesn’t happen in nothing happens without a law of
thought going into it. I as a board member heard every
one of the complaints and I attended every one of the
meetings that the students came and talked to us about racism.
And I’ve asked for reports on every one of these incidents and
I don’t still have all of these reports, but I am confident and
have been told by more than one source that these
reports are somewhat completed, many are, and they are in
process, and we will have them soon. It is really hard to take
actions on things when you don’t have the fax. He said/he said don’t warrant
and doesn’t warrant immediate drastic action.
»: Can I have cry it, please
»: It is my turn. I listen to you people out there. I give
up. »: For the person interrupting,
be quiet. You have already been called out of order once.
Please be quiet. »: Trustee Nielsen, are you done
? »: Thank you for listening. It
is not easy. I did not come with a prepared speech and I did not try to address
everything. Things will be done. And it has been painfully slow
and this board member, and I am not
alone is not happy about that. But change is happening
happening. The process; things take time. The process is
important. Without process there is anarchy. You saw some
of that surface surfacing this evening. Points a order, it may sound
rude and it may sound like we are trying to put people down,
but we are trying to give everybody a chance to speak to
us. We want to hear what you have to
say. Some of you understand like the rules we work under,
like may you know about the Brown Act we don’t have secret
meetings at talk to each other behind the scenes. That is
against the law and I don’t want to go to jail so I don’t do
that. So sometimes it takes longer for
me to find out about some things and sometimes it takes longer for somebody to
get back to me with what I know. And then it is not just me. We
all want to know the same things and then some things may be
should not be done in public until we have proper
information. But this board, I know, and I
have been sitting on it for six years it does listen to the
speakers. I have listened to every one of the people that
came and protested and the students that came in and
reported the discrimination »: Quiet »: We do care and we are taking
some action and I apologize that it is taking so darn long and
I’m not any happier about it than some of you, but that doesn’t mean that we gave
up. So thank you. For those of you who voted for me, thank you.
Sorry I volunteered, but I did it. I so I will see it through. »: Any other comments on the
motion? Trustee Gallardo? »: Thank you, Trustee Miller. I
just want to thank the community. And with Jonathan,
for folks, they were not here for our mission. And I think everybody is here
for our mission, Trustee Abboud. I think 85, 86, 87% of our
budget goes to salaries and benefits. Without The
Foundation, our students cannot have what they need for
them to further their educational goals. Trustee
Abboud, you know that community colleges are the pipeline for
many of our unrepresented students and so we need the
community. The community — I am a K-12
teacher. I here the heart of the
philanthropic community. They come forward and step up. And I know Kate, you are at with
the unified school Board. I work with the school board and
it is not a perfect school board and they too are lacking in
money and they desperately needed the community to support
them. We have a Facilities Master Plan
that hasn’t gotten underway because unfortunately, Lyndsay
Maas and the team have been taking care of other
stuff. We cannot get our accreditation reaffirmed at our
facilities are not up to date. If you are a homeowner, as I am,
as my in-laws are, you have been paying into a public school
system. Your bonds are going down. And
I know that because my father showed me his tax bill. So for
us to say that the community does not care for our mission,
everybody here is for our mission. Santa Barbara is an amazing
community and I have been able to work with kids on the east
side, the West Westside and now on the upper east side and have
seen the heart of this community pour out for the kids and
families in a way that no, other community has. So without the folks here, Santa
Barbara City College is not going to be able to fulfill its
mission and to get kids and families and our elderly what they need and education is what
is going to get our communities to thrive. I want to thank everybody here
and I want to remind our board that we need our community and our community
needs us. . (Applause)
»: Thank you. Trustee Croninger, Trustee Haslund? Any comments? »: I disagree that this agenda
item on the Pledge has been a distraction. I think that it is an important
issue. I think that it is important
that our community, members of our community came out to talk
to us about it and what it meant to them. I went to private
schools. We did not have the Pledge and I
did not give it a lot of thought
because it was not within my educational
upbringing. But those schools were certainly
no less patriotic and committed to community than I know each of
you are. And what I heard tonight were
deeply personal stories and deeply
personal feelings about what the Pledge means for you and for this community and
for this college as a public institution. And I appreciate
that. And I thank each and every one of you for coming out
and talking with us this evening. It has been a long evening and
many of you have stuck it out the whole
time and that is important because you too get to hear from everyone who wants to
speak. The community in my view and in
the view of the, folks, who train us
about how community colleges operate, the community is the
shareholders of the college. You are the people, as Trustee
Gallardo just said who support this college. You are the people our students
need to succeed and we are grateful for that and we are
grateful for your contribution to helping SBCC to
succeed. So thank you for coming out and thank you for
speaking with us and letting us know what you think. .
(Applause) »: I said something earlier to
the effect that democracy is messy. It is also the system that I
think works best for people , certainly it works best for
Americans. We have to learn to live with
the messiness. The admonition I would offer is
to see if we couldn’t come to the point where we don’t assume that if we
disagree with each other, that we are adversaries or that we are the enemy . The Pledge of allegiance is
going to be hours. I can predict that vote. But I
don’t assume that simply because you can recite the Pledge of
Allegiance that you are a patriot, neither do I assume that because you choose
not to recite the Pledge that you are not a patriot. I assume everybody that spoke
tonight is a card-carrying patriot of
the United States and that you mean to
behave that way and I would offer the suggestion that one of
the things that we can do most effectively is to help those who have served in the military as
veterans, people who come back and have great difficulty transitioning from
military service into civilian life. There are things we can do to
help that process and I would think that it would be certainly one
indication of my patriotism, something that I do. I am also a veteran . We had a number of e-mails,
some of which, as Katie said, really,
really terrible. I have never been called those
things before in my life and the suggestion that nobody on this was a
veteran was really offensive. And what I am having to deal
with is not to be offended and it just
to assume that okay there are people who don’t know and maybe they don’t care.
But I do care. I do care very deeply about this country and; therefore, I will
support this bill because I want us to
get back to the issues that have to do with teaching and learning and making
sure that each student who attends
Santa Barbara City College has an equal shot at succeeding.
That’s why we are here. Thank you, all for coming tonight. I
appreciate the time. I know it is time consuming and you have sat here for hours and you
have offered your testimony and please understand that those of us
sitting up here really do know how to
listen. (Applause) »: I think every Trustee has spoken
so I would call for the boat at this
time. »: Trustee Haslund, just a
technical question if you want to keep the numbers and the
story correct. It was a since 1959 and a
resident in July 2018 added it? Would it be okay if I make an
amendment? Would you second it. That later we were it from the
agenda on generate 10 like we can keep the story consistent
with dates and it is clear because I think we heard Trustee
Abboud say that we never had the Pledge before and we did. We had it since July and we said
it at every meeting. We you be okay with adding the amendment?
»: Sure. »: Angie, did you get that?
»: Just technical. »: Madam Secretary, is this a
role call boat? Can you add the boat?
»: Student Trustee Igbechi?
»: Aye. »: Trustee Hasland?
»: Aye. »: Trustee Nielsen?
»: Aye. »: Trustee Gallardo?
»: Aye. »: Trustee Abboud?
»: Aye. »: Trustee Miller?
»: Aye. »: Trustee Parker?
»: Aye. »: Trustee Croninger?
»: Aye. »: The resolution passes
and we will now move on to Item 5.1,
approval of the minutes from our meetings of December 132018. Special meeting of January 92019
and the regular meeting of January
102019. Do I hear a motion to approve — »: It this is the exciting part!
(Laughter) »: I move approval.
»: Do I hear a second? »: Second. »: All those in favor — any
discussion? No discussion? All those in favor?
»: Aye. »: And with this continuation of Item 6.1 on
the Ombuds program, do I have a motion to adjourn?
»: I move. »: Do I hear second?
»: I second. »: All those in favor?
»: Aye. »: Meeting adjourned.

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