Sajid Javid warns UK risks sliding into nationalism amid growing threat from far right The Indepen

Sajid Javid warns UK risks sliding into nationalism amid growing threat from far right The Indepen


Sajid Javid warns UK risks sliding into nationalism amid growing threat from far right The Indepen Try Independent Minds free for 1 month Home secretary stops short of calling Donald Trump racist and defends Boris Johnson over letterbox comments has called for action to stop the UK sliding into nationalism as movements grow in power around the world. The home secretary appealed for a national conversation about extremism as he announced the government was drawing up a new strategy to combat multiple threats. Around the world populism, prejudice and even open racism have catapulted extremists into power, Mr Javid said. Thankfully our politics has not gone down the same road as much of Europe and the US, but we must act now, to avoid sliding into the barely masked racism of nationalism. Mr Javid praisedwhenwas appointed as an adviser, saying the partys support has collapsed because of its lurch to the right. He urged people not to label the Brexit Party extremists or demonise anyone with a different view, amid mounting polarisation in political debate. Mr Javid delivered his speech at an event in central London organised by the Commission for Countering Extremism, which published research on Friday finding that in Britain. The home secretary, who is expected to retain a cabinet post under the next prime minister, stopped short of labelling a racist but heavily criticised the US presidents calls for ethnic minority American Congresswomen to go back to other countries. I am deeply concerned about the polarisation were seeing in parts of the US, some of the naked populism we see and chants of send her back, Mr Javid said, pledging that the UK would be a critical friend to American allies. Mr Javid called on all public figures to moderate their language but refused to criticise when The Independent highlighted his . Its incumbent on all politicians to be careful about the language they use, the home secretary said, before reiterating his support for Mr Johnson in the Conservative leadership race. He is someone who is passionately anti extremist and passionately anti racist, and embraces modern Britain, he added. Mr Javid insisted that the Conservative Party would root out anti Muslim hatred in its own ranks and defended the governments decision not to adopt a proposed definition of . He accused the Labour Party of failing to address and claimed that Jeremy Corbyns office had threatened to sue him amid a . The Independent understands that Mr Javid was sent a legal letter and issued a clarification, after which no further action was taken by Labour. The home secretary said the governments 2015 counter extremism strategy had focused on Islamists, and it was time to take stock and talk openly about the threat and admit its got worse. The faultlines dividing our society have splintered and spread, he said, saying far right extremism, antisemitism, Islamophobia and religious intolerance were all on the rise. We all have a role to play to stop the normalisation and legitimisation of these views. Mr Javid said he had barred several extremists, including the leader of white nationalist group Generation Identity, from entering the UK and would continue stripping British citizenship from dual national Isis members in Syria. He said the controversial campaign group Cage, whose research director described Jihadi John a beautiful young man would be stripped of its right to sponsor migrant workers. Outlining a series of proposals to improve integration, Mr Javid said he would request more money for English langauge lessons and balance out ethnic segregation in primary schools. We must not be afraid to confront these issues and be open and honest in public debate, he added. The government is to consider full recommendations from the Commission for Countering Extremism in September, following nationwide research on peoples views and experiences. A survey found more than half of respondents had witnessed extremism online or in person. Sara Khan, the lead commissioner, said people must retain the right to be radical and offensive. We need to start talking about what we stand for as a country, and what we are defending, she added. Only the best news in your inbox Only the best news in your inbox Register with your social account or to log in You can find our Community Guidelines in full Create a commenting name to join the debate Create a commenting name to join the debate Create a commenting name to join the debate You can find our Community Guidelines in full Create a commenting name to join the debate Create a commenting name to join the debate Create a commenting name to join the debate Enter your email to follow new comments on this article. 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