R.J. Palacio: 2019 National Book Festival

R.J. Palacio: 2019 National Book Festival


>>Roswell Encina: Good
afternoon everyone. Hi, how are you? [Multiple speakers]. I’m Roswell Encina. I’m the chief communications
officer for the Library of Congress. I know, it’s a highfalutin
title. You don’t care about that. But one thing we care
about is this book, right? [Cheering]. Raise your hands if you
read this book once. Read if you read it twice. Read if you read it. Raise your hand if you
read it three times. So, I’m just like all of you. So, I know you’re not
here to listen to me. So, please welcome
to the 2019 Library of Congress National Book
Festival, R.J. Palacio.>>R.J. Palacio: Thank you. Thank. [ Applause ] Hi guys.>>Roswell Encina: So, R.J.,
I was telling you yesterday that when I told my friends
that I was going to be talking to you, I had to speak to
some of your toughest critics. One of them is 10-year-old Jet
from Minneapolis, Minnesota. He said about Wonder,
it’s an awesome book. And I want all my
friends to read it. Eleven-year-old Sophie
from Baltimore said, this book has really changed
my whole perspective on people with disabilities or
people with deformities, and it has largely affected the
way I view and treat people. Thank you, R.J. Palacio.>>R.J. Palacio: Oh,
that’s wonderful.>>Roswell Encina:
How do you feel about when you hear things,
especially from kids?>>R.J. Palacio: You know, when. You know, I get these emails
that make me cry all the time. Because, you know, when you, when you’ve been able
to impact or inspire. Or your words or your book
has been able to inspire kids to want to be kinder
to one another. You know, I, I don’t even know
how to respond to that almost. It just makes me want
to cry all the time. It’s amazing.>>Roswell Encina: And
then, I was reading that many schools have added
Wonder to their book list. And even, you know, Julia
Roberts, who was kind of the big proponent
to turn Wonder into a movie even said
that, I bought Wonder and I could not put it down. I read it to the three kids. Her three kids. And they were all. And they all knock
it out like she did.>>R.J. Palacio: Right.>>Roswell Encina: I mean.>>R.J. Palacio: Yeah.>>Roswell Encina:
Julia Roberts.>>R.J. Palacio: I know. I know. And that was really,
really fun when I met her. Because apparently, she
was as nervous meeting me as I was meeting her, which
really is kind of astonishing. Because it was Julia Roberts. But, you know. So, it’s been, it’s
been really an amazing. This whole. I mean Wonder came out
seven years ago now. And the fact that it
is still so relevant, and that people are
still talking about it. And that I’m still
speaking to people about it is very humbling. I mean, it’s the only
thing I can, I can, the only word I can use really. It’s amazing.>>Roswell Encina: Now, for
the people who don’t know. What made you write this book? And why did you have
to write it?>>R.J. Palacio: You know,
I had a very brief encounter with a little girl who had
a very significant facial, craniofacial difference. She looked very much the
way I describe as Auggie as looking in the book. And my younger son, who was
only about three at time. He started to cry
when he saw her. Because he got a little scared. And that just got me
thinking about what it must be like to face a world every day
that doesn’t really know how to face you back, you know. And, and anyway, I started
writing that very night. It was just a, you know, I just
thought there’s a book here. And I started writing.>>Roswell Encina: Now, the book
deals with a lot of, I mean, serious and even tough subjects.>>R.J. Palacio: Yeah.>>Roswell Encina:
Especially for kids, you know, from acceptance to betrayal,
from bullying to friendships, from overcoming challenges
to family relationships. But, as you mentioned,
the core essence of this book is kindness.>>R.J. Palacio: Right.>>Roswell Encina: Why
did you focus on kindness? I feel like it’s one of
the traits, I hate to say that we tend to ignore
or take for granted.>>R.J. Palacio: It,
it’s funny because when. I know as a parent, when
the kids are really little. You know, the sandbox
rules are kind of like. As parents, we’re
always like, you know, say please and say thank you. And be nice. And be kind. And we emphasize that with
our very, very young kids. But as the kids kind of grow
up and go into middle school, I have found that there’s a
tendency to, to focus more on things like, you know,
have you done your homework? And no more Fortnight. And, you know, that
kind of thing. So, I feel like we
almost forget that, that that very essential core
value of kindness is something that needs to keep being
reiterated, especially, oh my god, especially
in middle school. You know, it’s something that
I think we forget as parents. It’s really important
to emphasize on an everyday level
with our kids. Because, you know,
it’s just something that I think kids do need
to be reminded about. I think adults need to
be reminded about it.>>Roswell Encina: I was about
to say, this day and age, I think parents tend
to forget what it felt like to be in fifth grade.>>R.J. Palacio: Yeah.>>Roswell Encina: Or
going into middle school.>>R.J. Palacio: Right.>>Roswell Encina: And the
challenges they had to feel. So, one of my favorite parts of the book was said
by Mr. Tushman. Does everybody remember
Mr. Tushman?>>R.J. Palacio: Mr. Tushman.>>Roswell Encina: We’re not
going to get into the jokes. You could all tell
that to yourselves. Plus, I have a microphone on. I shouldn’t be telling
Mr. Tushman jokes. But he did say during
the graduation, and it’s my favorite part. He says, shall we make a new
rule of life, always to try to be a little kinder
than is necessary. Then, he said later,
it’s such a simple thing. Kindness. Such a simple thing. A new word of encouragement
given when needed. An act of friendship,
a passing smile. It’s so true.>>R.J. Palacio: Yeah. It’s not hard. I mean, well, you know,
actually I shouldn’t say that. Because the thing about
kindness and, and why, why it is such a valuable,
it’s such a valuable commodity, is that it actually doesn’t
always come instinctively. Sometimes we do have to go out
of our way to choose kindness. I mean there’s, the,
the important part of that whole idea of
choosing kindness is that we actually have to
make a conscious effort to choose to be kind. Which is kind of
almost the difference between being nice
and choosing kind. It’s one step further, you know. And, and sometimes it’s hard. I find myself, you know,
someone cuts me off in traffic, you know, your first instinct
is not necessarily to be kind. You have to kind of
slow down and say, ah, just choose kindness, you know. So, I think it’s because it’s
a little harder to achieve that makes it so precious. And makes it so amazing
when people are kind. And they show kindness
to each other. And the thing with kindness
is that it’s one of those, it’s like it’s got
this boomerang affect. You throw it out in the world. And eventually, eventually
it kind of gets everywhere and comes back to
you a little bit. So, it’s one of those
things that you kind of get out in the world. And eventually everyone
else gets it out. And hopefully, it elevates
everybody to want to be kinder. I mean, that’s my dream. I don’t know. I think it can happen. What do you guys think? Yes. [Applause]. Certainly. I have to tell you. And this is honestly from
the bottom of my heart. I have no doubt that this
generation will do that. I absolutely believe
in you guys so much. I go around schools
all over the country. And I so believe that
this generation is, is like really woke to kindness. So, I’m, I love that
you guys are going to be leading the world someday. So, just keep it up. The grown ups need
to be reminded. So, just do that.>>Roswell Encina: So, one
of my other favorite things in this book was,
it was pretty much in the first couple chapters
was Mr. Brown’s precepts. I think both it was
clever, and it was genius. And it kind of set the
tone for the entire book. But I mean especially
the first one. When given the choice
between being right or being kind, choose kind. I honestly think it’s going to
be one of those quotes in books and movies that’s going
to, you know, last.>>R.J. Palacio: Right.>>Roswell Encina: Where
did that come from? What. Where did this idea
of precepts come from?>>R.J. Palacio: The
precepts came from, actually it was just
an idea I had. When I was like 13 or 14
years old, I was a big reader. And I had a journal, like a
scrapbook, where I would write down any quotes that
really moved me. So, I had this kind of
scrapbook of precepts. And in terms of that particular
quote, that was a quote by Dr. Wayne Dyer that
I had read or come across years before
writing Wonder. Had always stuck with me. And so, the opportunity
came to use it. And I just used it.>>Roswell Encina: So, I
bet many of the kids here in the audience have a
favorite character in the book, or in the favorite movie. Many of you will
probably say Auggie. Actually, my favorite
character is Jack Will. I feel like Jack is
like the typical kid.>>R.J. Palacio: Yeah.>>Roswell Encina: I remember
me probably being like Jack when I was in fifth grade. You want to be cool. You want to, you know,
be with the cool kids. Be the funny one. But you wrestle with the idea of
being nice and not to, you know, side with the bullies.>>R.J. Palacio: Right.>>Roswell Encina: How did you
pick the personalities for each of these kids that
are in the book?>>R.J. Palacio: Again,
that’s a kind of the, the most magical
part about writing is that the characters
kind of, it’s weird. I have to say, you’re writing
and suddenly, you know, you come sometimes
with the names first. And you introduce
the characters. And before you know
it, they’re kind of revealing themselves to you. It’s a very strange and
wonderful thing that happens because in a way
when you’re writing, if you don’t have an outline. I didn’t have an outline. A lot of just, you know, I would
be writing not knowing how the scene would end. And there were lots of. I did not know, for instance, as I was writing the
Halloween incident. You guys remember the
Halloween incident? And I didn’t know as I
was writing it that one of them would be Jack Will
until suddenly it was Jack Will. It’s weird. It just kind of. I don’t know, the characters
kind of take essence and form as you write them. It’s not like they’re
born fully formed. They take a while.>>Roswell Encina: Speaking
of these characters. I know you’ve mentioned
in several interviews and several talks that
you’re not writing a sequel.>>R.J. Palacio: Right.>>Roswell Encina: To Wonder.>>R.J. Palacio: Right.>>Roswell Encina: Like
everyone else, or on behalf of this entire audience, why? [Laughter].>>R.J. Palacio: You know, I. Well, I should say that I
said that a long time ago. But I still have
the same feelings. I’ll tell you why. I think that I said everything
I wanted to say in that book. And, and then, in the subsequent
short stories that I wrote that appear in Auggie and Me. I. Because I did want
to, I didn’t want to include the Julian Chapter in
Wonder because I felt in a way that Julian’s story did
not belong in Wonder. It belonged in it’s own book. But after I wrote the Julian
Chapter and Shingaling and the other sort of subsequent
stories, I really feel like I kind of, I wrote
what I wanted to write. I mean the whole story of
Wonder is about Auggie. It’s about his journey toward
acceptance and self-acceptance. And I think we learn,
as readers, about him. That at the end of
that fifth-grade year, he learns everything he needs
to learn about himself to carry with him for the
rest of his life. And people have often
said, like, you know, you ended so optimistically. And I chose to end the novel on an optimistic happy
note in Auggie’s life. That was my sort of
prerogative as an author to end wherever I wanted to. And I wanted to end on
a happy day for him. That doesn’t mean that his life
will necessarily always then just be one happy
day after another. We can assume that Auggie, as he
grows up and goes to high school and college and becomes
an adult. We can assume that he’ll
have his share of ups and downs just like fifth grade. But the important thing
ultimately is that he knows that he has whatever he
needs to have inside of him to get through anything. And that to me is the most
important lesson of Wonder. That, that I think people
understand themselves and they start to realize that they have the
strength inside of them. And they have the
friends near them. And the family around
them to get, you know, to get through anything. Certainly, Auggie does.>>Roswell Encina: But
you’ve kept the other books in the Wonder universe.>>R.J. Palacio: In
the Wonder family, yes.>>Roswell Encina:
So, how many people, how many kids have
read Auggie and Me? I don’t want to give
anything away. So, I’m just. And, you know, we,
we’re all wonders. And next month, you have a new
graphic novel called White Bird. I’m lucky I got a
copy of it already. So, it’s also in
the Wonder universe. Let’s talk about Auggie and Me
without giving anything away. I love that, as you mention,
it focuses on Julian, Christopher and Charlotte.>>R.J. Palacio: Right.>>Roswell Encina: And
I should say, though, when I was reading it,
some of the subject matters in this book are a bit serious. With Julian, it dealt
with the Holocaust.>>R.J. Palacio: Yep.>>Roswell Encina: I had
no idea it was going there.>>R.J. Palacio: Yeah.>>Roswell Encina:
With Christopher, it dealt with divorce. And with Charlotte,
with homelessness.>>R.J. Palacio: Yep.>>Roswell Encina: And why
do you think it’s important for parents to talk
to their kids about these serious subjects.>>R.J. Palacio:
Because we should. It’s hard. It’s really hard. I know, as a parent, we
want to do everything we can to protect our children. And keep them as innocent as
we can for as long as possible. So, I think it’s important to
introduce some of these topics in an age appropriate way. But I do think that we teach
our kids values when we impart, you know, the good and the bad. And teach kids how to,
how to deal with them. I think if we give them agency
in, you know, with Charlotte. And the how, you know, she feels
like she wants to do something. And with all of sort
of these issues, I think giving children the
capacity to do something, to mitigate the issues
that they’re confronted with is actually a really
valuable thing to teach them. I think we’re seeing it
now in the world today. We’re seeing kids marching. And we’re seeing kids feeling
like they have some agency in all the discussions going
on about climate change and the stuff that’s going
on that impacts them. I think it’s really
important to be able to in an age appropriate way
open up the world for them. And it’s also a way of, honestly of deciding what
information they can have too. I mean because if they don’t
hear it from you as parents, they’re going to
hear it from someone. So, it’s almost better, I think, to be able to impart
these things in a way that you can control
a little bit. So that, with White Bird,
the graphic novel, it, it’s all about a little
girl who is Jewish. She goes into hiding in France
when the Nazi’s have marched in. So, you know, I think it’s
an age appropriate way to deal with these themes. And, and that’s what I
wanted to do basically.>>Roswell Encina:
Speaking of White Bird.>>R.J. Palacio: Yeah.>>Roswell Encina:
And Auggie and Me. Julian’s story focuses a lot
on what happens in White Bird.>>R.J. Palacio: Right.>>Roswell Encina: You know,
after reading Auggie and Me. I mean, after watching
Wonder and reading Wonder, we didn’t like Julian,
obviously. He was a major jerk.>>R.J. Palacio: Yeah, yeah.>>Roswell Encina:
Towards Jack and Auggie. Why do you think it was
important for us to see his side of the story afterwards? And what happened to Julian? And kind of give
him a redeeming.>>R.J. Palacio: Well, I.>>Roswell Encina: Ending.>>R.J. Palacio: I think it’s
really important to remember, especially with children, one
mistake doesn’t define you. One, you know, if you make,
if you make a mistake, if you, if you regret it, if you try
better, I think you have a shot at redemption, especially
with children. We, you know, it’s I think
kids go through phases. And I think the problem
with Julian is that he wasn’t getting kind of. I think ultimately his
problem with Auggie was that he was scared of Auggie. And he didn’t know where
to go with that feeling. And it came out in
animosity and bullying. He certainly wasn’t
getting the support and understanding he
needed from his parents, who were so blindly willing
to go along with his caprices. So, I think.>>Roswell Encina: And
it took his grandmother.>>R.J. Palacio: And it took
his grandmother to be able to finally kind of
get through to him. And so, it is a redemptive arch. And I wanted to show kids that
one mistake doesn’t define you. One, one bad thing
doesn’t make you bad. It just means you made a
mistake and you can move on. So, so, I thought it
was important to show, show them that even
Julian, and, you know, even Julian can become
extraordinary. You know, and, and
a wonder as well. So.>>Roswell Encina: I
also love the diversity of the characters
[inaudible], you know. From. I mean, I guess,
Auggie says it well. You know, you have
a hand-me-down kid to the trust fund kid.>>R.J. Palacio: Right.>>Roswell Encina: To Charlotte. Then, you have the
other kids in school. They come from all different
maybe social backgrounds, racial backgrounds. And I just feel like it
just blended very naturally without even dwelling on it.>>R.J. Palacio: Right.>>Roswell Encina: Was that.>>R.J. Palacio: Thank you.>>Roswell Encina: Something
you purposely wanted to do?>>R.J. Palacio: That was.>>Roswell Encina: As a good
reflection of New York City.>>R.J. Palacio: Yeah. I was going to say, that’s
a reflection of my growing up in New York City
in the public school.>>Roswell Encina:
Reflection of the world.>>R.J. Palacio: Yeah. Well, it should be. Certainly, my experience
had always been one of tremendous diversity. I am a first generation
American. I am the daughter of two
Columbian immigrants. My first. My mother
tongue was Spanish. So, you know, it’s not
something that I thought. I mean, one of the things that
I like, that I wanted to do with Wonder was not necessarily
call out the diversity. It’s just, it’s not something. You know, I don’t go
around introducing myself, you know, with a label. It’s just something that I am. And I feel like the
characters in Wonder end up revealing themselves, oh,
she’s this or she’s that. And that’s a natural reflection of who we are today
as a society. At least where Wonder
takes place. I realize that it’s not
like that everywhere. But certainly, in, in,
in Brooklyn, New York, and in New York that
tends to be the case.>>Roswell Encina: Before
we take some questions from the audience,
we have to ask you.>>R.J. Palacio: Sure.>>Roswell Encina: How
was it filming Wonder? Did you know she
was in the movie? She was. [Laughter]. How was it?>>R.J. Palacio: It was. I was an extra. Way in the back. Thankfully.>>Roswell Encina: You
were sitting behind Julia Roberts [inaudible].>>R.J. Palacio: I
was sitting, yes. The director. The director. So, he was a little Easter egg. The director, Stephen Chbosky,
thought it would be really cool to put my family behind the
Pullman family in the movie. So, I sat directly
behind Julia Roberts. My husband, who you
will recognize if you watch it again,
has a big beard. He’s sitting directly
behind Owen Wilson. And my two sons are sitting
behind the other kids in that row. And this is the standing
ovation scene. In terms of what it was like
to film, to be on the set.>>Roswell Encina: And see your
words come alive, I should say.>>R.J. Palacio: Yeah. It was crazy. I have never felt. I mean, I don’t know
if I’ll ever be able to experience that again. It was. First of all, meeting
Julia Roberts and Owen Wilson, and Mandy Patinkin,
and Daveed Diggs. And like, all of these people. And those little kids
were so adorable. Noah Jupe, who played Jack Will. And Jacob Trembley. I mean, they were just
like so phenomenal. And so fun. It was an extraordinary
experience. And I, I, I. Sometimes I think I dreamed it. But luckily, I could
then go ahead and, you know, pay per view. And see the movie. And I know it wasn’t a dream. So, it was great.>>Roswell Encina: So,
before we take a question. You ended the book. As you notice, I’m a
big nerd when it comes to [multiple speakers]. It ends with a precept from
each of the characters.>>R.J. Palacio: Yeah.>>Roswell Encina: What
precept do you want to tell our audience
tonight as a takeaway. Not to put you on the spot.>>R.J. Palacio: Oh, that
is putting me on the spot. But, you know, I think
the, the one that is in the Julian Chapter is one of
my favorites, which is be kind because everyone you meet
is fighting a hard battle. And what I like about that is that you never really
know what’s going on with someone else, right? You just, you don’t know what
other people are going through. So, you can imagine that
everyone has a story to tell. And I think when
we remember that, it gives us a little bit more
compassion, just generally. Because we understand
that, you know, the world doesn’t
revolve around us. It, you know, the world is. Every single person has a
world revolving around them. And I think if we could let
our guard down a little bit and remember to treat people
with tenderness and compassion, I really, naively
maybe, I don’t think so. But the world really would be
a better place, especially now. And last night I spoke at the
Library of Congress because I, we’re living in very
strange times at the moment. And I will just say that
my parents, as immigrants to this country, were
treated very kindly by this country over
50 years ago. And I would love to see a
return of that kind of kindness. And I don’t see why
we can’t have it. [Applause]. So. [ Applause ] That’s it.>>Roswell Encina: Let’s
take some questions. I know many of you
have questions. If. I know you’re
all on your beanbags and you’re very comfortable. We’re jealous honestly
that we have to sit in these very hard chairs. Let’s start. I can’t see who’s on this side. Whoever had the microphone
over here, go ahead and ask your question.>>What was your
inspiration for Summer?>>R.J. Palacio:
Oh, well that’s. It’s funny you should
ask about Summer. Because almost all the other
characters were inspired usually by a mash up of different
kids that I knew or people that I’ve known. But Summer was actually inspired by a little girl I knew named
Summer, who was like the nicest, sweetest little girl
I’d ever known. She was, she’s absolutely
like one of those amazing kids that just I always remember. And I named my character
for her.>>Thank you.>>R.J. Palacio: Thank you.>>Roswell Encina: We’ll go to. I like your t-shirt.>>Thank you. Were you intending to put these
harder topics in your book to expose more children to them?>>R.J. Palacio: Certainly, with
White Bird, my graphic novel. That definitely was an
intention because I wanted to, I wanted to make sure that kids
understood that certain things that are happening now have
a, have a context that, that things like this
happened in the past. And sometimes led to very
dangerous things that happened. And so, I thought it
was important for kids to see the story of Sarah,
this girl who grows up feeling. You know, she feels
very ordinary. She’s like everyone else. But little by little,
her rights get diminished and she’s dehumanized in a way
that makes it very much easier for her persecution to happen. And I thought I was important
to remind people that we could, we could go down that path
before if we’re not vigilant. So, so, that’s why I decided to
write specifically White Bird. And, and bring up
those subjects.>>Okay. Thank you.>>R.J. Palacio: Thank you. That was a great question.>>Roswell Encina: Thank you. We’ll have the one
here on our right.>>Do you think you’ll ever
write a book outside the wonder universe?>>R.J. Palacio: Yes. I definitely will. I just don’t know when. But soon. And, and,
and next, I think.>>Roswell Encina: You
have a cool t-shirt too. What is up with this side
of the stage, I should say.>>What inspired you
to make Jack Will?>>R.J. Palacio: Jack. Well, my older son had a couple
of friends, two brothers. One was named Jack. The other was named Will. And whenever the mom would
pick them up from a play date, she’d like, hey, Jack,
Will, time to go, you know. And that always just
stuck in me. So, Jack Will is kind of an
amalgam of those two brothers.>>Roswell Encina:
We’ll go here.>>Is White Bird and Julian’s
grandma’s story connected?>>R.J. Palacio: Yes. In fact, White Bird is
an expansion of that. So, in the Julian Chapter, Julian’s grandmother
tells Julian her story. You know, in the
course of two pages. You know, she tells a
very brief version of it. I decided to take those
two pages and turn it into a graphic novel to
tell her story in detail. Because, again, I think
it’s worth telling in these times we’re in.>>I just want to say, really, thank you for making
the book Wonder.>>R.J. Palacio: Oh, thank you.>>It’s really amazing.>>R.J. Palacio:
Oh, you’re so sweet. Thank you.>>And I was wondering who
or what was the inspiration for the character Charlotte?>>R.J. Palacio: Charlotte. Charlotte just kind of
came out of my head. I think the thing with Charlotte
out of all the characters. And people sometimes ask
me, you know, who did you, who would’ve been you
when you were little? You know, and I wish I could
say I would’ve been Summer. I wish I could say that when I
was in the fifth grade, I was, you know, as nice and
angelic as Summer. I was much more like
Charlotte, I think. And I think Charlotte is
a very relatable character because if you think about
Charlotte, she’s nice, right? She always says hello to
Auggie, but from a distance. You know, she always,
she’s never one of the ones that’s
mean to Auggie. But she also never does anything
to kind of stop the meanness. You know, she’s kind of,
she takes a back seat. And, and that’s because I think
it takes a lot of courage, especially when you’re in middle
school to stick your neck out and be that kid who,
you know, who steps up and defends another kid. So, I think Charlotte was kind
of more like me a little bit. I mean, they turned her into
a more comical character in the movie, which I liked. But, but I think in
the book, she’s, she, I think she was most like me.>>Thank you.>>R.J. Palacio: Thank you.>>Roswell Encina: I think we
have time for one more question. Sorry.>>In your name, what
does R.J. stand for?>>R.J. Palacio: It
stands for Raquel. That’s my first name. And my last name is [foreign
language], Jaramillo. That’s my first and last name. Palacio was my mother’s
maiden name. And my mother, not to
get all teary here. But my mother is the
person who always, always, from when I was little,
said that I was going to grow up to be a writer. And unfortunately, she passed
away before she saw me become a writer. And so, when it came
time publish Wonder, I wanted a way of honoring her. So, I just thought, okay,
Raquel Jaramillo Palacio. But that was way too
long for a book cover. So, I became R.J. Palacio. That’s it.>>Roswell Encina:
I’m so inspired by everyone standing waiting
for their question to be asked. So, I allow one more.>>Okay. Is White
Bird being saled here?>>R.J. Palacio: Not yet. It will be on sale,
everybody, October 1st.>>Okay.>>R.J. Palacio: So,
I hope you enjoy it. I really had a fun time
because I not only wrote it. But I drew the pictures. So, I hope you enjoy it. That was a great last
question to end on. [Laughter]. Thank you. We did not pay him to say
that, but, you know, thanks. [Applause]. Thank you.>>Roswell Encina: I want to read the last
sentence from Wonder. And I feel like it’s perfect. It’s August Pullman’s precept. Everyone in the world should get
a standing ovation at least once in their life because we
all overcome the world. Auggie. I feel like we need to give R.J. a standing
ovation, right?>>R.J. Palacio:
Oh, oh, thank you. [Applause]. Thank you. Thank you so much. [Applause].>>Roswell Encina: And
on behalf of the Library of Congress, thank you all.>>R.J. Palacio: Thank you.>>Roswell Encina: I
hope you had a fun time. And we’ll see you next year.>>R.J. Palacio: Thank you. Thanks so much.

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