Poetics and Politics of Place

Poetics and Politics of Place



all right well welcome everybody to the panel on the politics and politics of place my name is richard simpson I coordinate the program this semester my students and I have been focusing on the ways in which environments functions as a political practice and practitioners and scholars and geography have approached or responded to this idea by developing new methods for analyzing the way in which landscape structure creates as well as limits possibilities for identity as well as forms of community we wanted to share a few sort of key words and a few sort of examples of how this works as a way to begin a discussion of the way in which this affects our own lives as well as lives in Alaska my students here are crystal Morgan Eva Shelby Eli and mark they range from first semester to fourth semester students here at I mean fourth first year at the fourth year students at UAS for many of them this is their very first public presentation so please join me in welcoming the critical geographers hi I'm crystal I'm a senior in the environmental resources program here yes hi I'm Morgan I'm also geography around mile studies with my name is topology this be my senior YouTube and as the openers we're gonna try to ground some big terms we've talked about throughout the class and we're gonna do this through a series of stories for you starting with the sci-fi sounding concept of time space compression basically as the mode and speed of travel advances the way people experience time in between their destinations is altered therefore changing the way people experience time overall for example let's go back to the 18th to the mid eighteen hundreds and people traveled the Oregon Trail vo horse and buggy traveling from Missouri to Oregon the trail took them four to six months the trail complete the railroad completely changed the travelers experience people could just hop on the train and be at their destination across the Train completely changed the travelers experience people could hop on the train and be at their destination across the country in a matter of days rather than months the space in between destinations hiim scenery instead of the harsh environment that travellers once endured now with airplanes travelers in the other destination around the world in a matter of hours as travellers soar through the clouds they can they don't even have to think about the space in between you can go to the airport here in Juneau and get tickets to Costa Rica or the travel time of between hours and only two stops this ability to travel anywhere in a matter of hours has literally Shrunk the world it has also changed the way people experience time overall in their everyday lives I'm gonna bring it back to modern day this object is an art project and known as the homeless vehicle it's designed for the homeless complete with a sleeping chamber storage space and it's completely mobile and this mobility is gonna be key as we move forward the time it takes for a person to get from point A to point B is a distinctly Geographic question and one that has changed enormously over time think about getting from here to downtown Juneau if you had to walk it's about 14 miles with a lot of ice along the way would you do it probably not now if we have a car the space in between is not a big deal the car allows for the space of 14 miles to feel compressed the time it takes to get there is greatly decreased and the significant comfort gained from traveling in a car or is attempting the journey on foot makes this 14 miles seem like less of an issue now back to the homeless vehicle many homeless tend to push carts around or carry all their belongings on their back each night they need to set up where they're going to sleep and every morning they pack it up again a very time-consuming process with this vehicle the individual can spend his or her time doing other things the way the experienced time has changed time space compression this story illustrates the theory of time space compression and now we see is our ability to traverse space becomes more efficient that way we account for time and spend our time also evolves now the homeless vehicle is not a solution to homelessness it merely treats the symptoms of other political economic and social issues at hands but what the vehicle does do is make the problem of homelessness visible if every one homeless person had the streets would be lined with them it also grants the homeless person the privilege of movement the vehicle allows the individual to go places that would have been too cumbersome to get to before homeless people tend to stay in one physical location typically in built-up urban areas the vehicle allows for movement which in many ways the individual does not have to their socioeconomic status the ability to move many take for granted but movement and mobility are major players in society geographer Doreen masse proposed a concept of power geometry which advocates for the politics of the movement I'd like to share a quotes that illustrates the politics of movement there is power in relation to the flows and the movement different social groups have distinct relationships to this anyway differentiated mobility some are more in charge of it than others some initiate flows of movement and others don't and some are more on the receiving end of it than others some are effectively imprisoned by it you are in society based off of gender sexual orientation economic class race affects how you move an experienced society effectively where you fall in the power geometry determines how you experience live through time-space compression again I like to go back to and talk about this concept of power geometry and politics and mobility Juno is an interesting place when it comes to politics and mobility how has mobility come how has mobility who has mobility to come in and out of Juneau due to the fact that Sheena is only accessed via airplane or boat mobility requires a great deal social capital first a person has to have access to technology such as smartphones or computers they need to know how to book a plane or ferry ticket they also have to have the finances to afford a ticket not to mention that seats on an airplane and space on a ferry are limited these two concepts have allowed me to see the cost and benefits of building the connection road of Haynes did you know much differently last year my grandma was in the hospital and my mom told me that I should come home and say goodbye I looked at plane tickets but due to that availability of seats and the cost of the plane tickets that wasn't an option so then I waited up the ferry to see if I can get on there there was enough space I wasn't able to leave this story like mine or stories like mine happen all the time and you know people can't leave mobility is very limited people's mobility too determines how they experience time and see the cells in the relation to the rest of the world living here in Juneau your social capital determines your mobility very much so so why do these concepts matter and by understanding these concepts what can we do with them power geometry and time-space compression are important because they allow us to understand mobility as a political issue and if we understand mobility as a political issue we can look into different solutions as to how to solve this issue now the other panelists are going to offer more examples of applications of these terms and in my final for this class I'll be researching how a place such as downtown Juneau can become a hub for specific subcultures I'll follow the threads of power geometry to see how movement methods we have today help facilitate the growth of such subcultures so next we have Eva who's going to talk about these concepts related to the construct of nature ideologies hello everyone my name is Eva Bingham and I'm a junior this year and my degree is yes geography and environmental resources today I will be analyzing and providing some relief of the social issues surrounding the topic of nature analyzing this topic through critical geographers point of view I will be explaining some new concepts that I have learned so far in this class and my best ability to help you all understand them as well I'll be tying these concepts in to a personal story a few of these terms that we have discussed in our class are the ideology of adventure culture capitalism and vertical ionisation of privilege nature itself is an idea it's a continuously changing idea and social construct has influenced heavily by cultural capitalism in the beginning of the semester me and a group of guy friends decided we wanted to go hike stroll or white which is mountain right behind our camp this year it's a little bit outside of the normal day hike around Juneau we wanted a bit more of a challenge on this picture I guess you can kind of see it that is truly right before we even started the hike though the day before I was feeling a little anxious not because I was afraid I wouldn't be capable capable to make it to the top because I was the only girl in the group five boys I'd be going on this hike it can be intimidating at times but this anxiety that I felt can stem back to childhood ever since as a young girl I've grown up watching and listening to media that tells us how women are typically removed from the frame or denied a presence in the wild urn wilderness and nature writings two TV shows we see this gender bias all over it's still prevalent today as residents of Juneau I'm sure many of you enjoy spending time outside nature to some is an escape a way to get away from everyday life we leave behind Society and move into what we imagine a more neutral space yep I before I even started this class I didn't realize how much cultural influence we were bringing with us when we actually enter go into nature Here I am and many others taking with us our predetermined thoughts and biases biases with us as we enter into the woods once at the top of the mountain we we break we take some selfies we take victory group pictures some snapchats I even had enough service at the top of the mountain to post on Instagram this is my picture that I posted mean the guys this class has changed my views on a lot of things this is when the concept of vertical ization of privilege comes into play skyscrapers typically built in city centers our buildings built straight up towards the sky above all other city buildings the usual person and to walk to work in these towers are those in higher class with power and educational background and money whenever I hike to the top of the mountain I typically don't look below me and think about wow look at all those poor people below me I've never really thought that but at times many times I'll choose to post a picture instead like this one on Instagram this lets the social media world know the victory of my mountain conquering defeat the skyscraper Mountain can both be symbolisms of privilege typically the people who have the opportunity to record and the outdoors are those who have the extra time and money on their hands the social media post of the mountain selfie broadcast to the rest of the world a person social and economic standing and distinction among others therefore what we may have at one time considered nature as a neutral space actually stands as a platform to increase our social class distinction like the skyscraper a symbolism of wealth and power a physical sign of class distinction so is a social media post of the mountain peak the idea of nature as a social construct has molded and changed throughout history Raymond Williams a critical geographer that we have read about many times in our class wrote that we have lost interaction with our environment and instead use it merely for functional purposes for example we extract resources from nature we use it as a cultural space to increase our social standing and enhance capital that derives on nature we've designated wilderness areas in national parks as places where the typical middle to upper-class individuals can go visit a place it's a place for them for us to escape and enjoy leisure time the ideology of adventure is a concept that Western notion of adventure instead of being nearly recreational has always developed in connection with the larger economic interests of the era I myself using myself as an example I like to go rock climbing I loved it downhill ski I just I love to be in the outdoors but this like many other nature sports demands technical equipment I myself AM constantly contributing to a capital that surrounds these sorts of sports and activities that involve nature big-name brands such as Patagonia Black Diamond are ways in which we buy into the outdoor capitalist culture this another form this is another form and where we use nature as a platform to show others are ranking social class therefore what purpose does nature hold if in fact in order to participate you must fit into a specific class gender system race and socioeconomic status I ask myself the question what now the ideology of nature in our culture as a place to merely increase our social standing has left me feeling somewhat hopeless kind of empty because I love to do these things does this mean I need to delete all my social media never post a picture on a mountain again I don't believe this is the solution to the problem the purpose of this class is to allow us to look at everyday life through a different lens today now I'm going to be more conscious than ever before as to what I decide to maybe post or share the ideology of adventure and nature is an idea that has been and will continuously be changing what we can do now possibly is to be more aware realize and open minded to the cultural influences that we take with us wherever we go even into nature and there most areas in the wilderness with that I am going to be passing the baton over to Shelby who will also be sharing a personal story and talking more about nature hello my name is Shelby Clark I'm an undergraduate student here at UIs I'm in my second year and my major is geography with an emphasis and environmental studies over the summer I worked out at Kenai Fjords National Park in the visitor resource protection department the RP that basically means I was able to be the law enforcement of the park it was pretty wicked being of the RP Ranger I was test to patrol trails go on any search and rescue case that was reported in the park and do specified trainings like ice field traversing dunker trainings rappelling and climbing and getting my old earnest first aid certification to ensure I had the ability to answer questions as well as keep people safe on the trails I met tens of thousands of people over the summer from all over the world every single person's interactions with the park were different and I began to notice trends of the individuals relationships in relation to how they would respond to the park this was a prime example of the impact of nature on a society groups from tour buses and cruise ship with back a sense of reality and fear when encountering wildlife the tourism industry exploits nature and the animals within it for the industry's gain by showing Alaska as an abundant land filled with the animals that are harmless the concepts and ideology of nature and one's own perception begins to change the way civilization in nature Coralie is not a harmonic balance in fact nature is the opposite of civilization so from someone's experience in their society is a direct correlation and how they will respond to more natural setting over the summer I came into contact with a lot of wildlife including bears and moose growing up in a rural community in Alaska this one was pretty normal to me and I understood the proper actions to take when encountering a potentially dangerous animal my relationship to wild animals in Alaska's pretty relaxed because of how my community up north interacts with nature being outside and exposed to the environment constantly is a way of life for a large portions of Alaskans and situations like that nature becomes an extension of yourself if you consume off the land it becomes an extension of your body for people with a different society these norms and customs are going to be vastly different for example I met this family um from chyna that was touring alaska by tour bus and cruise ship while hiking one of the chair trails i stopped to answer some of their questions and suddenly a cow moose and her calf started walking down the trail ahead of us without hesitation this family ran up to the moose and began taking pictures with the moose putting themselves in harm's way luckily for them the family wasn't seriously harmed just chucking up from the fake charged the moose presented the family with stories like these aren't really uncommon everyone in this room probably has witnessed a tourist in the summertime getting out of their car to approach an animal on the highway to get a picture or even out at Mendenhall Glacier approaching a bear these examples are a representation of the social constructs around nature and of our own personal relationship to nature while many things can tamper with our personal relationship to nature it is based off binaries Society share as a whole from this we realize how vitally important it is to recognize the way nature is exploited and observed nature affects everyone in the ideology of nature is simply just the blurry line that intertwines humans in nature itself when we understand nature in the role it plays in our lives individually in on a societal level we can begin to break binaries that bind us nature doesn't see binaries but the people who use nature do the landscape and people on that landscape are connected and so is everything else from the animals that roam to the plants that grow everything has a purpose and plays a role in a bigger picture that pertains to society for my final project in this critical geography class oh I will be looking into ethnobotany in the economic botany these are big words but at the OU botany is just how plants are related to the past present and future societies and economic botany is how plants affect cultural and economic activities I will focus on ESCO and potato also known as Mathieu and study how the plant has shaped Alaska's culture history and the movement Alaska's indigenous population endured eventually leading to the renaming of Machu to Eskimo potato movement is a really powerful concept that allows everyone that affects everyone in our society and with that being said in April I would have loved to print it for y'all but that cost money here so it's on my phone excellent cool my name is Eli I'm a freshman here for bonding degree but so I really appreciate Shelby's presentation for me I explore the extent to which the car has altered our perception of time and space to explain such a claim I've sent Doreen Macy's power geometry and progressive sense of place to explain the concept of what exactly time-space compression is now historically as suburbs have grown closer to each other through modes of construction better faster transport easier faster spread of ideas the suburbs also seem to extend themselves to be closer to the metropolis that we've seen in Shiva Bush's essay of Paris and the suburbs approaching Paris the metropolis this is an act of what's called temporal shrinking this can be seen in any development of a major city across time also across time one can note the decrease in the literal size of different modes of transportation from a train to a streetcar to a personal automobile the individuals transport space has been shrunk around them and this refers to Wolfgang shovel versus Bush's Afra mentioned term of temporal shrinking the shrinking relates to the physical space around a person or society based on advancements technological advancements that are constantly occurring and since these advancements are constantly forever occurring the term temporal is used allowing room for change when space and the human mindset come in contact the space thereby becomes actively judged creating a closer relationship from the suburbs of the suburbs over less room for the individual and the mode of transport means more room for displacement of said individual now the temporal shrinking of transportation shows a direct relationship with the expansion of transport space integrating civil bushes and makes us turn together time space compression implies a geographical stretching out of social relations over time making the car take over an issue for an anthropologist and not the critical geographer like myself however I undetermined to do my best anthropologist impression and analyze his face which we gained through the loss of okay perhaps that last part just sounded confusing but let me explain it due to the shrinking of Transportation that has occurred car companies were left with the question okay so we took away space so how can we satisfy the customer in creating a fake space around them well the constant city suburb and even the back road country construction for cars have shown that we are willing to make considerable accommodations for the car okay so this is Detroit in 1960 you can see there's a grid system left right four main roads going to one central hub now for time sake I won't get into a deep analysis of this that's what my later lecture for is my car the friend of me check it out in your pamphlets highly recommend it's gonna be great I hear but we have constructed cities where one has to drive the grid system is made for the pedestrian is made for the density of the public and throughout time as you can see this is the same picture from the same area but at now our accommodations have been constructed and our cities have been made for the personal transport car proving temporal shrinking still alive and well so the question still posed and still poses itself to every interior car designer about how can the individual individual space be altered so that the blighted city space in between the destinations becomes unconsciously compressed the answer light to the individual space as well so what do you all see in this TV okay leather luxurious right got a phone bill right in the wall yeah this is actually a giant I mean just for this no this is not a private jet but it is in fact the 2015 Cadillac Escalade it's incredible TVs which some of us have in our minivans a built-in telephone which we carry our cell phones with us so in fact but we don't have you know seats that face each other in the backseat made of leather so I'll give you guys that but oli I don't have a private jet for a car I can see that however I do contend that your space is just as blighted as that of whoever made by this 2015 Cadillac car companies have started marketing to target specific lifestyle specific ideologies perhaps some of these may bring about trunk space kayak racks third row back seeds for the soccer moms the party animals even voice command for the busy bees with the eyes on the road the accommodations have become insane and for a critical geographers space sorry for the pixels but we have started to envision a future where driverless cars might make us dependent on technology in cars in a new way that we haven't thought of yet now to a lesser extent since 1933 drivers have had every one of you every one of us have had the option to literally listen to me control our climates in our car that's right I'm referring to AC and central heating this is as you can tell a major accomplishment by the car companies if we go into a car without a/c or without central heating we think this is out of place are you guys listening to this okay look we have put ourselves in a position where we think we should be able to control our own weather forecast isn't this insane to you and you don't even think about it you turn on your heating you're trying to turn on your a/c and you think that you have the power to control your own own climate it's insane and we get all caught up in this and we miss the nature in between our destinations the the mountains the papaya trees the clouds that we literally drive through the sunset reflecting off the lake it incredible and me it gets compressed to a point where we as a species complain if we can't heat our butts when it's cold outside it's become incredibly clearly you can see how our perceptions of mobility time-space and privilege have been significantly altered so the next time you're fighting over ox or the radio channel just remember that sometimes it's nice to prove a capitalist wrong and enjoy the frontier that they haven't industrialized yet with that being said I would like to bring up mark hi everybody how's it going everybody's mind-blown it's a lot of a lot of terminology a lot of good stuff first and foremost I would like to begin this by extending a big thank you to the aqua fond for having us here on this land when I sheesh thank you very much my name is Mark I am also a student in the critical geography class this is my junior year close you know so basically what I'm gonna be asking you right now is just by a show of hands how many of you have used Google Earth that's a lot of people and that's like 98% of you I guess alright so you're involved in neo geographies neo geographies is just that use the use of technology in a new way to form geography and and and what this kind of ties into and what I've what I've kind of focused on in my studies is is the way that neo geographies goes into play in a personal way I'm talking about the geography of emotions so we've been talking a lot about the way humans incorporate spaciality and all the inner workings that that go into construction and constructing our personal and social lives and a lot of the time these scientific studies they really rely on this as histological works and studies but the fact still remains that through all of this we're talking about human lives we're talking about human complexities and the emotions that go along with being us so my research Venus semester has been focusing on the geography emotions and neo geographies as it pertains to the decolonization of cartography the first step to understanding this is to understand that places in our lives carry emotion with them it is the emotion carried by our own identity as people or peoples that make what may seem to others as just space on a map it makes it places that are so meaningful meaningful to us in many ways to exclude the emotions is to exclude a key set of relations that shape our lives and the world around us so modern technology has prepared maps has propelled maps into a whole new realm and neo geography is the use of those technologies such as Google Earth GIS and and tons of other map making technologies neo geography places the power of maps back into the hands of everyday people I see this as putting power back into the hands of those that have been taken away from these maps provide a format for people to express their sense of place with others and this also provides a format for political formation and in turn the mobility mobility is the key factor that has taken away by colonization I'd like to kind of oh by the way this is this is a map I got this off of the the boroughs website this is just basically kind of taking it back and putting placing the the indigenous names back on the land so I want to use this example this is a student project this project was done by Sarah Elwood and Catherine Mitchell and this was an after-school learning program where the participating students were asked to map out their everyday geographies so basically just places that they would you know pass every day places that the Associated different things with so when these kids were to do this a lot of things came up one one lady when one young lady put there that you know she passes a brightly painted house that she just likes to pass because she thinks it's pretty other kids kind of focused on a bus stop where they knew that other older kids sold drugs and it was kind of a no-no place to go and they avoided it at all costs one of them was an eating establishment where a lot of the kids expressed that they liked to go and hang out with their friends and and you know and have a meal and converse with them so beyond giving the students a format for expressions not provided a platform for often unheard voices they were able to see themselves as political subjects by gaining insight into places that drew on similar emotions for instance most of those students had a tied to that McDonald's this is that establishment that they said that they enjoyed hanging out at so yeah it was a place that he associated with independence one in one then one student indicated that that they have any rule that their don't allow any more than three students in there at a time so through this other people other kids got on there and said oh I didn't know that you know and so they kind of started to gather and you know as a unified team because it affected a place that was emotionally charged in another case another student mapped out a store where he was kicked out for taking too long to order something unfortunately when he was being kicked out of there the owner says hey you're not in Africa anymore so this kind of drew attention to that place bringing other people into the know about this place and they you know that that brought about a political formation they were all sympathetic to that the understood it felt like so we kind of did the same thing in our class as we're as I was presenting this dr. Simpson said well hey let's run this experiment let's let's do this let's let's see where where this goes and how we can tie this in so each one of us went through and I asked everybody you know what is this what is a special place to you what you know you can know if you haven't been here for a long time there's things associated with the time being here that have actually put an emotional charge of behind the stain so number one he was telling her story about the mountain that's her personal accomplishment right there on top of that mountain Shelby was in the car accident she associates this place with that emotion of feared and kind of danger he like he likes to go here and run a little thinking spun or not great crystal this is her roundabout from hell everything is spilled and everything is good top and she's nearly died so she gets that you know there's an emotion it's her own she likes you know it's your time away and you know to explore her her independence there this is Professor Simpson's run he likes to run on the docks at one time and then he kind of just slapped his face he knows that space and it's become place to him because he can tie that emotion of being there to it and this is mine this is the first time you my wife buy so that right there is you know very much so tied into my emotions in my understanding of this place and so you may say well why is this important production and sharing of these maps is important for a couple of reasons one it allows people to voice experiences and along with that the emotions that are tied to that place but more importantly allows people to recognize what recognizes ways that their experience may have been shaped by social categories and may be shared with others this is an essential tactic in political formation people no longer feel alone and they can mobilize and make effective change so in my final project I would like to explore the geography of motion and new geographies further in order to enhance indigenous cartography and it is my hope that through this this understanding of emotion and geographies in the sense of place that we can take crucial steps toward decolonization of the map so the next time like Eli said you guys are just driving around in your car from one place the next and to the right is just another mountain or to the left is just the wetlands or whatever understand that those places even though they become space to you you may not see that emotional tie there or may not have a direct impact on you to somebody that's those those spots that are empty are not to somebody that means something to them it could be anything I mean just pick a spot on the map and it probably means something to somebody so yeah thank you very much for listening we appreciate it and I believe now we'll be taking questions virtual spaces like Instagram whether it's you touch this pression or into your own personal okay excellent that's a great question yeah the virtual space is perhaps the biggest contribution to time space compression in the Millennial age now compared to a car you can be in a car you can be in the classroom I see it all the time in class you can be in the cafeteria if we're on our phone the present the place in space of now has become Disqus integrated completely compressed to a point to a fact that it's not even regarded if if you look at the studies in New York City and China that are incredible of how many people get hit while texting just walking just walking it's absolutely incredible and this is due to the fact that they put outside this death machine and put aside the space that's around them and completely compress it into Instagram text messages whatever is on their phone that is probably in my opinion the phone absolutely is the biggest contributor to the time-space compression today absolutely yes I feel that um things like Instagram Facebook they do leave that crucial element it's like when you look at a map and you can actually see okay here's this place in this place you miss out that even you missed that that time getting there so just like an Instagram and Facebook you can be sitting at home and it pops up like oh look where they're at they're at in some huge city what about the space that it took to get there you know what about that time it's not all and that's one thing that I really and really a kind of iffy about that sort of it brings the emotions that are that it brings it brings all positivity like oh look what I'm doing I'm here I'm there you know but how did you get there you know and what social factors what personal factors were incorporated into getting to that picture so yeah the timing space is seriously compressed there and it's it's distorted you know in a lot of ways so yeah thank you stories or memories on the mouth have you considered sharing that map out or making it public to where a larger people could contribute yeah well that's something that I'm gonna focus on in my final project having a like I said I haven't a lot to do with indigenous cartography zall so that's that it's a passion of mine but I think that's a great idea because like I said doesn't matter you've been here three months or thirty years you know there's going to be some place that means something to you and to have that mode of mobility and that political formation available you know in long run it could help with people just knowing that you know what you may be a first-year student but you're not alone because you know everybody else can come in and then comment on your place that you feel emotionally tied to and say hey I do too you know or you know I do and this so it can be used as a very crucial network for for a lot of people are we degrading those spaces in any way by putting our own personal stories on them or desecrating yeah yeah yeah I can see where I can see where you're coming from I would hope that it would be used for the for the better in this in this time now you never know but yeah we looked at the moment ourselves too I would say because like I had mentioned nature itself is just this idea and we've seen through history how how it's changed we used to you know way back wilderness you didn't go into it it was evil dangerous and we've seen throughout our history this idea of wilderness changing now we we go into it we venture into the unknown Alaska's known as the last frontier untouched land still and and I think social platforms like Instagram snapchat just keep contributing to that idea of going into the unknown and so I think if this hypothetical world we were to not have social media or stop posting about stuff like that then the idea and the concepts of change shirt of nature would start to change I don't know what to but bring in a picture so even though it was only in their mind they still eyes yes how do you think if we can as a society today we can push aside the technology and all this thing's we have a modern day to become more in touch with the wild man I don't think we can I think it's absolutely impossible for the world to forget and toss aside the compression that we do literally every day even right now you guys are there's a glacier and mountains behind you right now and you're looking at us it's not incredible to you like why are you looking at it the even I've been not on technology constructions just homes buildings anything that creates a different atmosphere than what you see out that window is compressing I only your space but also your time within nature now Doreen may see that we talked about she writes that human civilization and nature are kept separate their separate ideologies but in fact that's what creates and contributes to the ideology of separating the two is a separation and we came from there everything that you see right here came from nature this is nature and this shouldn't be put aside and on a separate page from what you see outside their window so perhaps you don't have to do anything but perhaps keep the mindset of this is nature I'm in nature at this moment and I guess that will probably contribute to a lesser compression time in space but honestly I think it's impossible to just toss aside the phone some I think I think it's a good point this class has really changed changed my view on a lot of things but I've also learned that there is no answer anything there's no definition of nature there's no definition of these terms there but could because they are constantly changing and as our society changes as culture changes so are these these terms that we're learning but I think the best we can do is to realize this and maybe a seal I said it said like as you gone to nature be thinking more maybe like I'm gonna be more conscious about what I'm doing or possibly posting or when I do go into nature the thing is even in that mindset or with the picture frame example you are thinking about the future you are thinking about that where are you gonna post this picture frame or when and how you're gonna change your mindset even then changing your mindset you are taking yourself out of the moments and putting yourself in a conscious state of I need to be conscious so even if you do put down your phones and you change your mindset completely that already takes you out of the moment so like Eva said there's society called is constantly changing so the answer is in cultural geography you'll find out are always ambiguous it's quite annoying sometimes that's the subject that we chose to study so I think it's important to understand also as they've pointed out is kind of a little dismal like oh you know you can't change it like it's just the way it is but there's also tactics that are involved in this one of them being political formation one of them being you know getting together with with the people that you trust and you feel tied to and that understand different situations that you're in or have the same type of mind frame and and organize politically in whatever sense that maybe whatever that means to you so yeah where whereas we don't have this solid back door way out you know we have ways together to make change in this effectively as long as you know we we have that that sort of mentality of looking at this strategy and understanding this tactic that we can use within this strategy to help us all sometimes getting your phone isn't always the best like it can be a great tool I share your individual stories and remembering that this is a place rather than a space we can share stories and link to people who are experiencing the same things around the world such as using Instagram or other social medias to share those and by doing so you can raise awareness in four political groups so it's just really how you use those tools I think you just answered the question I'm about to ask but it's like a apparent lighter or grumpy person could complain that a lot of these tools are crashing back to us as ways to second off our unpaid labor to create be on social media for advertisers and waste like you know collect our personal data so our emotions can be explained into cells more stuff so and then maybe that's like the parent said that I guess like the question for mark or for anybody is like how do you use tools like Google Earth for example in a way that's powering or animating a river and not especially I guess in comparison to like older ways of mapping like place names or like stories based others I think older ways of mapping the when you look at a map you automatically see borders and lines these represent immobility you've got zones from from the local level you've gotten your neighborhoods you know down deeds like your home your neighborhood your you know your zoning area all the way up to your state's your nation you know and stuff like that by using these new technologies you can you can take those lines away those lines don't have as much impact on you anymore they your borders are become dissolved and it kind of gives a person a sense of of that extended mobility to incorporate those outside of of the mobility range which gives you mobility and gives others mobility also so I feel it's just important to express those types of things on there without seeing those lines as they I mean as trivial as they may seem to some you know they mean things to others and it does represent certain types of immobility to people so and plus it with the with the using of personal emotions to advertise and stuff like that I don't know maybe I'm not on that real tech-savvy on those things but I know is like you have like I do not follow kind of thing I wouldn't know how to answer that real well though appreciate the Christine ice yeah yeah exactly you know going back to what I was taught when I was really young and something that's always been taught and I know it's been taught by so many people like you want to do to other people what you want to have done to you you know if that's not good for you it's probably not gonna be good for others you know so exactly have empathy be nice by taking those borders away and incorporating everybody else and then and stopping to listen to what people have to say about things you know that that can open up a whole new dimension to cartography and geography of emotions all together that's what it is just requires access to these technology tools in order to be able to have that mobility and so it's always that double-edged sword right like the technology is making map making it's even more people voice to maybe contribute to those geographies instead of just like beat or colonizers writing maps or drawing the maps you know however like you know we're really limited to who has access to those those new tools so I like to use it an opportunity to like think about that as a as another social justice challenge just in terms of the digital divide and who has access to these tools and how we can empower people to to learn to use those tools and then also just and I think

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