National Book Festival Presents Neil Patrick Harris

National Book Festival Presents Neil Patrick Harris


>>Carla Hayden:
Well, good evening. Good evening, and welcome. I told you that — when I
come it’s like official. Welcome to the Library
of Congress. I’m Carla Hayden, the
Librarian of Congress. So… [ Cheering ] Oh, I’ll get on this side. This is pretty fun. How are you doing? Oh, so, as you can
see, the people now in the auditorium
are looking at us. [ Cheering ] We thought that was
a nice touch. So, we can wave. Hey, everybody in
the auditorium. Well, it’s really exciting to
see so many of you here tonight. This is a sold-out event, and
I’m so glad that you are here, and we hope that you can
visit a display that we have of our Harry Houdini Collection,
and it will be in the pavilion, and I think you’re going
to really enjoy that. And also, if you
haven’t already stopped by our Booksellers
Table, Politics & Prose, you can have the books there, and we will also have our
special guest signing the books after tonight’s presentation
on the mezzanine, and just a little
tip, right up here. You can be the first in line. There is a benefit. So, right now, it’s at capacity,
but I think you’re going to have a pretty exciting
time here and a great call, and I have a surprise for you. You get to see him first. [ Cheering ]>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Hey, what’s up, guys? [ Cheering and Applause ] How’s it going? What’s up, overflow room? [ Cheering and Applause ] Nice. I like what you
did with the place. Thanks for coming. Thanks for being here. I’m going to go do
a thing over there. What’s more exciting than
watching me on television, then coming to see me live and
still watching me on television? [ Laughter and Applause ] Hopefully, we’ll
make it an enjoyable, you know, six, seven hours. We’ll have some fun. Hi. What’s your name? What’s your name? Oh, I’ll kiss it too. [ Laughing ] You have a sticker
on your forehead. There. [ Laughing ] Actually, you guys are going
to be helpful for second. I have this — this is
an envelope taped shut and sealed shut. Will you hold onto this? What is your name?>>Justin: Justin.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Justin, okay, this is important. So, I don’t want you to open it. But I want you to make sure
no one else exchanges it or messes with it. Yeah? Cool? You got it? Cool? Okay, cool, enjoy. I’ll be right back. Well, I’ll be over
there in a second. See you. Thanks for coming. [ Applause and Cheers ]>>Carla Hayden: So,
thank all of you. Enjoy the show. Don’t forget to get your books,
and you can have him sign it after tonight’s presentation,
and remember, the signing is going
to be right up there. So, right afterwards. You’ll be the first in line. We’ll see you soon. [ Music ] [ Applause ]>>Michelle Glymph:
Good evening. It’s me once more. We have a brief announcement
before we begin. First, please silence, or
turn off, your cell phones for the duration of the program. Second, we are delighted that Neil Patrick Harris
has graciously offered to sign books immediately
following his presentation. We have a few guidelines
for that process. To join the signing line
and meet Mr. Harris, you must have a signing line
ticket signifying purchase of his new book, The Magic
Misfits, The Minor Third. These tickets are
distributed when you pick up your pre-ordered folks or
buy books in the front lobby where you checked in and can
be obtained after the program. The tickets are divided
into groups by number. After the program, we’ll
call those groups in order. For those with special physical
needs or with an infant, we will provide an
opportunity for you to join the signing
line before others. We have every expectation that the signing line
will move quickly. And now, ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the
14th Librarian of Congress, Carla Hayden.>>Carla Hayden: Thank you. Thank you very much. Well, thank you,
Michelle, and good evening. Good evening to you all. I see two friends right
here, Jaden and Morgan. So, they’re right up front, and
good evening to all of you here and to everyone in the Coolidge. We’re in the Coolidge,
but in the Great Hall. Can we give a shout out to
them, because they saw that. Okay, because we have a
wonderful sold-out crowd tonight, and as many
of you know, the library hosts the National
Book Festival every year at the Washington
Convention Center. And we just celebrated it
two weeks ago with more than 140 authors and more
than 200,000 attendees. That deserves a hand. [ Applause ] Next year will be the 20th
year, and a big celebration. So, look for that. However, we wanted to expand
it to a year-long celebration. And so, tonight,
we are kicking off. And think you, this is the best
kickoff we could ever have. A brand-new author series called
National Book Festival Presents, and it will feature
award-winning authors and poets and illustrators right here
at the Library of Congress. And during these events,
we’re going to feature things from our collection like the
Harry Houdini Collection, and we hope that you
get a chance to — oh, give a hand so
that, yes, it’s true. [ Applause ] Because we want you to not
only meet authors and poets, but we also want you to delve into all the wonderful
collections that the Library
of Congress has. And so, we are collaborating
also with Politics & Prose Bookstore. They deserve a hand. I have to admit that at the
Book Festival I walked away with a bag full of books. So, now, I know you don’t
want to hear anymore from me, because we have to get
to our special guest. So, I know you also don’t
need me to read aloud his long and brilliant resume
of achievements. Many of you fell in love with
him on the small screen first as a teenager on
Doogie Howser MD. [ Applause ] Now, I may get this
wrong, so I need your help. Wait for it. Awesome. [audience
responding] Say it loud. [audience responding].>>Woo! [ Laughing ] Thank you. I will not forget that, now, and
also, you know, he won a Tony for his performance in
Hedwig and The Angry Inch. [ Applause ] But most of all, I know that
we love seeing him hosting the Tonys, the Emmys,
and the Oscars, and because he was
not busy enough, he’s now a celebrated author, and his new children’s book
series, The Magic Misfits. And just yesterday, the third
edition entitled The Magic Misfits, The Minor
Third, hit the bookstores. And so, Politics &
Prose has it right here. So, I wanted to also take this
opportunity to thank the donors to the library who are
making this possible, and we really appreciate
their support. And our special guest will
be interviewed by the Library of Congress’s Chief
Communications Officer, Roswell Encina. So, please give a big welcome to
the Washington and the Library of Congress, actor,
author, excellent showman, legendary Tony-award and Emmy-award winner,
Neil Patrick Harris! [ Applause and Cheers ]>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Hi, everybody! [ Applause and Cheers ] Oh, good, thanks, hi! Hi!. How’s it going? [ Cheering ]>>Roswell Encina: Welcome
to the Library of Congress.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Thank you so much. This is so very exciting.>>Roswell Encina: Can
you believe the library and said wait for it?>>Neil Patrick Harris:
And then awesome.>>Roswell Encina: It’s
a sign that it’s going to be a magical night.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Magnificent.>>Roswell Encina: So,
let’s get right to it.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Yes, sir.>>Roswell Encina: So,
this book, or your series, has been well received
by kids, by adults –>>Neil Patrick Harris: Awesome.>>Roswell Encina:
— and by critics. How does that make you feel?>>Neil Patrick Harris:
It makes me feel great. I never anticipated
being an author. That was something — I read a
ton of books and I love books, and I love watching our
kids learn how to read. The first job I ever
had when I was 10 or 11 years old was
in a bookstore. So, I just always
had an affinity for the book as a tactile thing. And so, when I had the
opportunity to be able to write an autobiography,
that seems kind of random because I felt far too
young to pontificate about things I’ve
learned in all my years. So I did a weird version
of an autobiography. I did through an anti-structure
autobiography called choose your own autobiography based on choose your own
autobiography based on those choose your
own adventure books. Apologies in advance for
how fast I’m speaking. [ Laughing ]>>Roswell Encina: He’s a pro.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Nice. [ Laughing ] And when I did that, it was
fun, and it was a different, you know, a different structure,
and I thought that was kind of fun, they asked if if I
wanted to write anything else, and Harper and Gideon, my
husband and my kids, are — at that time were five or
so, and we were reading lots of picture books, and I
thought, that would be cool to do a picture book, because
it can involve of magic. I love magic, and I thought
picture books and magic tricks and maybe teaching
younger kids magic and the ideas behind magic
seem like a keen idea. And then, our kids kept growing,
which apparently happens. So then, I realized that maybe
picture book’s not the best call, and I was thinking
ahead, and I thought about what about a middle-grade
like a chapter book? Because then these ideas of
kids who like them don’t feel like they fit in, which would be
very simplified in 48-60 pages, could be fully fleshed out. And then I thought, oh, wait. If it was really cool, it
could be a series of books.>>Roswell Encina: Yes.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
But not too many. [ Laughing ] And so, I thought what
if there were four books like the four suits
of a deck of cards?>>Roswell Encina: I’m
seeing them right here.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Yeah, I spent a lot of time on the covers and such, and so, that was sort of
how it came to be. We worked a lot on making
sure everyone was recognized in a certain way, that no
one felt excluded and yet, creating this fictional world
that was real time and modern but not technologically modern. So that it would kind
of be Rockwellian, timeless a little bit, and
could be read in a decade without pictures of flip phones. Kids are talking into.>>Roswell Encina: Well, let’s give the audience
hear a refresher, just in case there’s some
new readers out here, and anybody else who needs
a refresher like previously on the magic misfits,
give us a quick synopsis, what these books are about.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Well, there’s a town called
Mineral Wells, and it’s sort of a quintessential town, if you
liked The Goonies, which I did, it’s filled with locked
doors and passageways, and there’s a boy
named Carter Locke, who is the protagonist
of the first book. That suit is diamonds. And Carter learned
magic from his uncle. His parents aren’t
in the picture, and his uncle taught
him a bad form of magic, magic used for an agenda. The three-card monte, stealing
money, picking people’s pockets and stealing watches and things,
and Carter became very adept at that, but his
take on magic was that there was some reason
why magic was being done, and it was to sort of
take from somebody else. He ends up leaving his uncle
and jumping on a train, and the train takes him to
this town called Mineral Wells, and in it he meets these
other like-minded people, and he also meets a
magician with a top hat who owns a magic shop in town. His name is Mr. Vernon, and
Mr. Vernon introduces him to his daughter Leila,
who as well likes magic. She sort of likes escape. She can escape from
almost anything. She’s the protagonist
of the second book. You’re like my Vanna White.>>Roswell Encina: I
am your Vanna White.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
And that’s clubs. The suit is clubs. And there’s a couple twins named
Izzy and Ollie, and they sort of realized that their love
of magic and that their love, their individuality when
they join this close together and create this club
called The Magic Misfits, helmed sort of Mr. Vernon,
who runs the magic shop. They realize that they
can help solve problems. So, in the first book there’s a
carnival boss named B.B. Bosso, who has — who comes into town
to steal a diamond in the town, a giant diamond, and they get to
use sort of magical principles to keep him away
from doing that. It turns out, B.B. Boss was
part of this big other club, which you learn about
in the club’s book, and it’s called the
Emerald Ring, bum-bum-bum! And the Emerald Ring is a club
that had been formed earlier, sort of in Mr. Vernon’s
time, with other people, and there’s another woman
that comes in the second book, and her name is Madame
Esmeralda, a woman named Sandra Santos. And so, you learn that there’s
these two different clubs, one for doing things that are
for good, and for doing things to stop the goodness of magic. And so, cut to the third book,
which is the hearts suit, it is following Theo
Stein-Meyer, who is a prodigy violinist
and he always wears a tuxedo, and as luck would have it, his
violin bow can also work sort of as a magic wand and
make things levitate. So, his specialty is levitation. And there’s how very
dare you Sir?>>Roswell Encina: Exactly. We clearly can’t
levitate right now.>>Neil Patrick Harris: That
would’ve been so amazing.>>Roswell Encina: Yes. So –>>Neil Patrick Harris:
And there’s a forthcoming, pardon the pun, book, which
will be the fourth misfit in the group, and
her name is Ridley. And she’s wheelchair-bound, that she serves the
brains of the operation. She can make things
turn into other things. Not magic. Keep in mind, the
magic in this world that I’ve created is
still a practical magic. As much as I like magic with
wands and wizards in portals and things, for me, I’ve
always loved magic as a hobby. So, we’re dealing with things
that can actually happen. So, while Theo can levitate
things with his bow, I tried to write it and word
it in a way that it’s not so magical and mystical
that it’s impossible. So there’s practical
reasons for it. And these four kids then use
their skills together to, you know, form a community
together as themselves and help sort of
defeat the Emerald Ring.>>Roswell Encina: You
mentioned that you love magic. I mean, you love magic, because
you were a child of a magician. You were also the president
of the Academy of Magical Art. So, did you pull from
your personal experiences as a young magician or a magician now to
write these books?>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Oh, for sure, yeah. Magic’s been my hobby since I
was eight or nine years old.>>Roswell Encina: You mentioned
on the today show the other day that you had doves
when you were little.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
I don’t recommend it. [ Laughing ] Doves are adorable, but
they do very few things. One of which is coo incessantly. [ Cooing ] The other thing that doves
do is — this is how — this is how simple they are. If you take a dove and
you hold it upside down so that it’s laying on its
back, it just stops moving, it’s like you’ve hypnotized it. Then you flip it back over and [ Cooing ] So yes, I had doves
when I was a kid. I grew up in a very
idyllic, small town, much like Mineral
Wells, I guess, in the mountains of New Mexico. Most people think of New Mexico and is desert, but
this was not.. This was a ski resort
town called Ruidoso, and in the summer time, there’s
quarter horse racing there. And it was great, but
it was very remote. So, when we would go to
Albuquerque, the larger town in New Mexico, there was
a magic shop at the mall, the Winrock Mall, and it was
called Fool’s Paradise, and –>>Roswell Encina:
Is still there?>>Neil Patrick Harris:
It’s not not still there, but I love the title,
and I loved going. And I would save my
allowance, and I would go there, and it was a magic show — and
if you ever go to a magic shop, and you should frequent
local magic shops, because they’re just so
great, because the person that works behind the counter
knows all these tricks. So, you can say, what
is the thing over there with the blue deck of cards? And then, he’ll do
the trick for you. And it’s, you know,
uniformly impressive, but he won’t tell you how it’s
done unless you cha-ching, shell out the money. And that’s really exciting
when you’re a kid, too, because you’re desperate
to know the answers, and maybe that’s just me, that’s
kind of how my brain works is I like knowing how things work. I love seeing the machinations
of things, I love the automatons and I love backstage at a
musical were all the sets go. Like how did that happen? I love knowing that. That’s a magic trick
to me, right? And so, I would save up my
allowance, and I would go old, and I was seeing
all these things, and I’d just spend hours there at the counter, and
I would either –>>Roswell Encina:
What happened? [ Laughing ]>>Neil Patrick Harris: That
is the coolest magic trick, I think, I have ever seen. [ Laughing ] Will you join my
troop of merry men? [ Laughing ] Welcome, I apologize. And so, I would sometimes
save up my money, and I would buy one big
cool sort of parlor trick, and other times, I would buy a
bunch of little packet tricks, small, single tricks that you
can buy and on the car ride home from Albuquerque to Ruidoso,
for those three hours, I would be in the backseat
with the, you know, blanket over my head, and I
would be seen with the secret is and then learning what to say, and then I practice
it and practice it. And I just loved it, and I still
do, I think it’s a great hobby for people looking for a hobby. It’s very interesting,
in many ways. It’s than collecting a thing. Like if you collect stamps or
comics, that’s super great, as well, but you need to keep
it in pristine condition. So, you collect comics,
but you keep them in the little thing that’s
mint, very good condition, and it’s stacked in things,
and I don’t feel like you end up getting to utilize
them as much, right? Magic, you can perform magic. You can decide that you
really want to do mentalism, and then you can
delve into mentalism. You can buy tricks and go
to libraries and read books about mentalism, and you can
see shows, current shows, that are mentalists
doing amazing things. And then you can learn about
the histories of mentalists and how they came to be, and
that goes very, very far back. It’s really quite astounding
to be here of all places, earlier this afternoon before
they opened up the house, they brought some stuff –>>Roswell Encina: Houdini.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Houdini’s Collection, and these are actual relics
and artifacts from Houdini, and it’s just amazing. And Houdini’s very famous, but
there’s hundreds of magicians who have led equally
salty and exciting lives, and there’s a lot of
history to learn from that. So, as a kid, you
know, promoting a — writing a book, having twin
8-year-olds who are now able to read, I just found it fitting
into so many things that I like. I like being able to teach sense
of humor, to teach vocabulary, to open up like a little
Pandora’s box of the new world. I love skeleton keys
and secret doors, but I also love teaching magic. Within each book, there’s
four or five teach-a-tricks, and those are designed
more for younger set, for probably nine
or 10-year-olds. Although, a lot of adults
are terrible magicians. So they could probably
use them, as well.>>Roswell Encina: I was telling
you before we got on stage that I was up until two
in the morning trying to solve these puzzles.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Well, he’s speaking, so that there’s another
layer is in addition to the teach-a-tricks, also,
thought it would be fun to just pepper in some codes and
puzzles and things in the book that I never really talk about. That might clue you
into some things that will happen
in future books. Because I just loved that. When I was growing up, I would
read Encyclopedia Brown books and choose your own adventures, and I would just love sometimes
is a great book called The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin. Did you read that? Because as I was reading
it, there were clues that were solvable in them
that you didn’t even know, but you can solve it is
you were going along. And I did one of those
like real WTF moments, though I was a kid,
so F meant frick. And I — what the frick? And I went back, and sure
enough, I could solve clues and puzzles within the book
itself, I love that stuff. So, there’s secret things
in the book, as well.>>Roswell Encina: Let’s talk
about some of the characters. You mentioned some of them. What I like about them is
how diverse these kids are. There’s a little young
African-American boy who plays the violin.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Theo Stein-Meyer.>>Roswell Encina:
You mentioned Ridley, a young girl who’s
in a wheelchair>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Ridley Larson.>>Roswell Encina: And
Leila has two dads. How important was it for
you to have a reflection of how the world is, so
that kids can see themselves in your book?>>Neil Patrick Harris: Well, that was honestly
very eloquently put, and that was why — that
was kind of why I did it. I question delving too deeply
into the reasons why I did that, so that people listening think
that that was a real agenda of mine, and it wasn’t. But it was more to create a
reflection of a kind of world that we now live in
that has all types. So, instead of Leila’s — the
fact that Leila was adopted by Mr. Vernon is
traumatic to her, and that you find
out in a second book. But that doesn’t define her,
and the fact that Mr. Vernon, his partner is the
other Mr. Vernon –>>Roswell Encina:
Who’s a chef by the way.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
He’s a chef.>>Roswell Encina: Who
does he remind you of?>>Neil Patrick Harris:
At the Grand Oak Resort. Yeah, so, my husband’s a chef, but I didn’t want
it to be so overt. So, I had him drawn and look
a totally different way, but I made him sort of not a
lot of hair and kind of round and glasses to be different. My husband did not like that. [ Laughing ] It was no commentary at all. I was trying the opposite. I was trying to deflect — but
it didn’t work out that way. But the fact that there is, you
know, that Leila has two dads. The fact that Theo has
many brothers and sisters, and they’re all musicians
and affluent and proper. The fact that Carter
was raised by his uncle. I just wanted to exist in the
world, so that it represented, I suppose, but more so that
people could read the book and feel that they could
connect to it in some way. It was –>>Roswell Encina: All
those misfits, thank you, representing everyone. One thing I really adore about
the book is the big theme about it, which is that you
can find magic anywhere. I think there’s a lot
of books out there that you were talking about. You need ones, and, you
know, there’s spells, and there’s curses, but
this involves like magic that we can all learn, and
I feel like the big theme of that you could find magic
anywhere is what I think really connects to most
readers I’m going to read one little part here
that’s like my favorite, that really explains everything. It’s from Carter. He says, quote, “I think magic
is about more than stagecraft, Carter said, it’s
about happiness. It’s about laughter. It’s about that feeling
you get inside.” And I feel like, especially
in this day and age, kids should be able to
connect to something that makes them magical, whether
it’s a smile from their teacher, a bravo from their parent, I feel like everybody has
something to learn from.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
For sure, but also, I just like the magical things
that happened in real life. Not everything is a
card trick, right? But I hear what you’re saying. That you want to have feelings
that are magical feelings. But I like when a
chameleon can change color. Like that, to me, is
so weird and magical. You know what I mean? I like when a sunset makes the
sky turn all these interesting shades of color. That to me is a magic trick. So, I think there there is magic
to be found in nature, energy, you know, in, like you
I say, being proud. There’s a lot of
opportunities for — do you want to see a card trick?>>Roswell Encina: Yes.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Watch this. [ Laughter and Applause ] No, it’s small, but it’s
one of been working on.>>Roswell Encina: I tried
so of the tricks of the book, and I failed miserably. I was trying it on
myself, so I wasn’t sure — I’ve got to try with
some coworkers.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Yeah, you might have figured
out how it’s done.>>Roswell Encina: Yes.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
All right, deck of cards.>>Roswell Encina: All right.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Normal
cards, nothing shady about them. I want you to take them,
and I want you to hold them in in your hand face down. And I want you to imagine
where the right spot is. It can be anywhere, and I
want you to just cut the cards and look at the cards
that you cut to, okay?>>Roswell Encina: All right.>>Neil Patrick Harris: You can
take it and take a look at it. I’m not going to
look at that one. Will you show it to everyone
and make sure that I can’t see? Can you see it there? In the overflow room, sorry.>>Roswell Encina: Can
you see it, overflow room?>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Okay, you got it, okay, put it back in the deck,>>Roswell Encina: Hold on.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Yep.>>Roswell Encina:
Did I do it wrong? Hold on. [ Laughing ]>>Neil Patrick Harris: Fine. I don’t want to peek. I don’t want to do
anything interesting. Okay, I don’t know if you’ve
noticed, but I spilled water. I have another card
that’s in my pocket that was put therefrom before. This is for my own
deck of cards, and how remarkable would
it be if those matched. Now I don’t want
you to say the name. I don’t want you to say
the name of the card, okay?>>Roswell Encina: Okay. What was it?>>Neil Patrick Harris: Do
you remember what it is?>>Roswell Encina: I
do remember what it is.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Think
of the name of your card. Have you got it in your mind? I don’t want you to lose it. Think of the name of the card. You got it? Was it the eight of clubs?>>Roswell Encina: No. [ Laughing ]>>Neil Patrick Harris: Was
really not the eight of clubs?>>Roswell Encina: It
wasn’t the eight of clubs? [ Laughing ]>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Okay, don’t tell me. Don’t tell me. Don’t tell me. Wait. Wait. I have a backup. Was it really not?>>Roswell Encina: It wasn’t.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Okay, don’t tell me. Don’t tell me! Was it — I have a backup
card here in my back pocket. [ Laughing ] King of diamonds. Seriously?>>Roswell Encina: No.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
It wasn’t? Okay, let’s move on then. [ Laughing ] Was it really — it wasn’t the
eight of — okay, don’t show me. Don’t tell me. Don’t tell me. Ace of diamonds? Okay. Now, what’s
your next question? Sorry, [ Laughing ] It’s getting warm up here.>>Roswell Encina:
I got warm, too. Before we get into more
tricks, did find — did you have your own Magic
Misfits when you were a kid that served as an inspiration?>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Well, I guess I kind of was a bit of a misfit. I mean, growing up in a tiny
town, I was mostly surrounded by farms and football,
and I was kind of into singing in
playing xylophone. That was my instrument
of choice. When they went around and asked
what did you want to play, why didn’t I play trumpet? I had to walk around with
this metal thing with a strap around my neck, ding-da-da-ding,
ding-ding-ding-ding. I love it, I can still a
mean Flight of the Bumblebee. [ Laughing ] But I regret, you know?>>Roswell Encina: You
were talking about earlier that you saw our
Houdini collection, and I love that you
made reference of Houdini in the second book. So, I love –>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Jack of spades?>>Roswell Encina: No. Now I can’t find my tab. You got me off. All right, you say here
that, “Houdini was part of this club whose mission was
to stop people from believing in fortunetellers,”
Ridley continued, “and most of the old photos where the spiritualists
were supposedly spitting out this ghostly slime called
ectoplasm, Houdini figured out it was actually made
of wet cheesecloth.” So, because of your love for
Houdini here at the Library of Congress, we believe that
every person could connect to some of our treasures, so, we
have a little surprise for you. So, I would like
to call the Chief of the Rare Books division. I’m hoping he shows up.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Well, that was cool.>>Roswell Encina: With
the big surprise for you. [ Applause ] [ Speaking off Mic ]>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Nice to see you, sir.>>Mark Dimunation:
Nice to see you.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Nice to see you, too. Have a seat, have a seat.>>Mark Dimunation:
No, I’m fine. Please stand here. We had the pleasure
of showing you some of the Houdini Collection. For those of you in the
audience who don’t know, Harry Houdini bequeathed
his entire record to the American people at
the Library of Congress. And what we saw today was
a series of scrapbooks, among other things, so, we thought we would give you
your own scrapbook to take home. And one of them is if we
can have our first slide up. If we can do the slides, yes. This is, perhaps, the
most important item in the Houdini collection. Although it would take many more
decades before Houdini became an escape artist, at the age
of 12, he disappeared. He went for work he just forgot to tell his mother
he was doing so. He hopped on a freight train,
and realized he had to write to his mother and say,”I’m
on my way to Galveston. You won’t see me for a year,
but I send my regards.” And signed it, most
importantly, “Your Truant Son,” and then his real name –>>Neil Patrick Harris: Erik.>>Mark Dimunation: Erik Weisz. So, we thought this
would be a good way of starting off your scrapbook.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Wow.>>Mark Dimunation: What we’ve
left for you, if we can go to the next image, is a
series of pictures and items that show us the
history of Houdini. So, after marrying
Bess, in particular, and after Martin Beck suggested
at a vaudeville theater that leave the card stuff alone.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Sure.>>Mark Dimunation:
Move on to escape.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
The big stuff.>>Mark Dimunation: He
became the wizard of escape, especially handcuff and chains. And this is a very
early, I might add, beefcake photo of Houdini. [ Laughing ]>>Neil Patrick Harris:
I’ve been there.>>Mark Dimunation: Yeah. [ Laughing ] It’s a good job. Can we go on to the — can
we go on to the next image, if you would, please —
if we could go — yes. So, Houdini, in order to –>>Neil Patrick Harris:
The Weed Chain.>>Mark Dimunation: The Weed
Chain Tire Grip Company. Wherever he would
travel around America, he would orchestrate these
challenges from the gatekeepers of insane asylums, to the
makers of locks and handcuffs, and a variety of other things, and they would issue
these challenges. He would sell insurance
policies to the audience. If I fail, you’ll
double your money. Of course, he made a killing. So, we thought one of them, we
would just pull one of these for you to see what will
become the rise of Houdini so ultimately the most
famous man in the world. It happens by locking at
the next slide, if you will. In 1908, Houdini –>>Neil Patrick Harris:
He shrunk.>>Mark Dimunation: Yes,
he’s a very short man. In 1908, he does his famous
milk can escape trick, in which he has himself
submerged in a milk can full of water and padlocked shut. As he goes underwater,
he asks the audience to hold their breath,
one minute, two minutes. By now people are recording
of the audience is gasping. As he goes under,
he reminds people that when you do capture
your breath, I’m drowning. Three-and-a-half minutes go by. The audience is now in a panic,
and justice they’re rising to go liberate him from the
can, he walks up the side of the stage dipping wet. This makes him internationally
famous and rises to great fame. So much so, that if we
look at the next image, he gives his hand
at motion pictures. He probably should have
stayed in the can, I think.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
I like them. I think they’re good.>>Mark Dimunation:
He does great escapes, and he also does
airplane tricks, which he becomes
quite famous for, and there’s a great incident
in which there’s an accident, and the stuntman falls,
and Houdini insist that they continue filming. And he takes his place on the
ground, and it becomes part of the plot of the film. Finally, just to finish
it off for your scrapbook, we’ve given you is
she is his stationary. That’s the next image. He’s very proud of himself
and continues to add to the stationary over
years with various vignettes of his accomplishments. At the bottom, that little
black square, he’s quite proud of the fact that Funk & Wagnalls
coined a term, “Houdinize,” which means to wiggle out. And finally, the last
image, his bookplate, never missing an
opportunity to promote. So, we thought that it was
wonderful given your own interest in magic to be able
to share Houdini with you, and we just wanted you to
be able to take something –>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Wow, thank you so much.>>Mark Dimunation:
Thank you for coming.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
I really appreciate it.>>Mark Dimunation:
Thanks very much.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Wow. [ Applause ]>>Roswell Encina:
That is so kind. You didn’t expect that
show and tell, did you?>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Not at all.>>Roswell Encina: We’re going
to start taking questions from the audience soon before
our music division people come out and start showing
their collection.>>Neil Patrick Harris: But
wait, I have one question.>>Roswell Encina: Sure.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
King of clubs?>>Roswell Encina: No. Before we start questions
from the audience, what do you want these young
readers,I see a lot of them here in the audience, to
learn from the book?>>Neil Patrick Harris: Oh, wow, I wish that there was a
singular thing, I think, hmm, I don’t know how to answer
that to multiple demographics. I think what’s exciting about
reading is that you can take from but something
that’s individual to you. And what I’m uncomfortable doing
is feeling like I know so much that I’m able to sort
of be preachy and speak with too much authority. And so, when I’veied to do with
these books is designed them in a way that you can
learn magic tricks. You can learn life lessons. You can learn about people who
are like you, and you can learn about people who are
nothing like you. And you can also just read and
enjoy the adventure of it all. So, it’s not, you know, trying to do anything
super-duper highbrow. At the same time, I hope that I can maybe getting
younger demographic, a younger generation of kids,
who don’t know about magic and how fun it can
be, to appreciate it on a few different levels.>>Roswell Encina: I absolutely
adored it, as I told you earlier that I was up until two in the morning just
solving the puzzles.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Oh,
you know another cool thing? When you take the
jackets off the books — it doesn’t look like the book. I had them do this
nice gold leafing and it says the name
of the kids. So this one says Carter, and
then this one says Leila. The other says Theo. And then there’s my initials are
on the top, because I wrote it. [ Laughing ] But I also have three random
letters that aren’t so random, because when you put all
four books together, A, it looks like you’re very
smart, because it looks more like an encyclopedia,
but then it says M-A-G, mag, and I-C-M, icm. And itsp. So, it will say magic
misfits when you have all four of them together, but I
thought that was kind of cool. [ Applause ] So, just don’t put a
glass on top of it.>>Roswell Encina: So, let’s take questions
from the audience. I will let you pick him.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Oh, really?>>Roswell Encina: Yes.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
All right, you raised your hand
really fast in the middle. That was so nice, that gift was
really — that’s very sweet. Hi.>>Man: Can you hear me?>>Roswell Encina: Yes.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Hi.>>Man: Hey, so,
every magician sort of had their own signature
magic trick, right? Have you developed your own, and are you able to
show it to us now?>>Neil Patrick Harris: Well,
it went so well the first time. If I — I probably know
the most about stage magic, because of lot of the principles
within stage magic have to do with — are also principles
for theater, and so, I’ve always been drawn to
[inaudible] and to the Thurston and William Robinson and people
that designed illusion stuff. Because I was a kid who
— I was born in 1973. So, when I was watching TV,
there was very little inter-web, and there were few
channels on TV. And David Copperfield used
to be on TV once a year. He still performs more
than any magician ever. He’s in the Guinness Book
of World Records, I believe, but he would do these
singular shows where he would make the Statue
of Liberty vanish live on TV. And then, the next year he would
walk through the Great Wall of China, and you’d
see it happening. And then he’d take an Orient
express car, train car, and people will be holding
hands surrounding the train car. He’d make it levitate and then
vanish, the entire train car, and within it, he would do lots of other smaller,
interesting tricks. So, I had an affinity
for stage magic. Lately I’ve been more
interested in mentalism. Like I mentioned before. I don’t know. I think there’s something fun about debunking the
spiritualists who claim that they can, you know, read,
authentically read minds, but I do think there is
something about intuition and being able to sort
of read tells of people, and kind of glean information
from them in certain ways. Is probably what I do
most often when I dabble.>>Roswell Encina: Let’s
get a kid with a question.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Oh, yeah, hi. Yeah, you — right,
absolutely, in the dress. Yeah, hi.>>Girl: Who’s your
favorite magician?>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Who’s my favorite magician? Well, wait, keep the microphone. Do you mean my favorite
magician ever of all time, or do you mean my favorite
magician now that’s currently doing magic?>>Girl: Your favorite — both.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Both, all right. [ Laughter ] I think you only
get one question. [laughter] I’m just
teasing my favorite magician of all time is — oh,
gosh, I don’t know. Probably Howard Thurston. He traveled around at
the turn-of-the-century on sleeper train cars, and
it was right at the time when those big stage shows were
the height of entertainment, and people dressed up
and had never seen some of these effects before. So, I just loved
the theatricality of that time period. Currently speaking, there’s
a guy named Derek DelGaudio that I directed a show of
his called Nothing to Hide. And then, I produced a show of
his called In and of Itself. And he does card stuff. But he’s able to take
magical effects and put them in a context that makes you feel like you’re having
a TED Talk kind of life lesson about things. Ted’s this guy who
knows a lot of stuff. [ Laughing ] So, Penn & Teller in Las
Vegas are doing really fantastic stuff. I love the Vegas magicians. That the really good question,
thanks for asking both of them. You look beautiful, by the way. Is that dress — and the
shoes match the dress. What’s your name?>>Chaylee [assumed
spelling]: Chaylee.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Chaylee, and a beautiful name.>>Chaylee: Thank you.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Yeah, thank you.>>Roswell Encina: I thought
Mr. Thurston actually was the millionaire from
Gilligan’s Island.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Oh.>>Roswell Encina: That
somebody else though. [ Laughing ]>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Was that Thurston? [ Audience Responding ] Oh, Thurston Howell III. True dat, true dat, all right,
what about this lovely girl here in the blue with the dark hair? Yeah? I’m picking girls
with blue dresses today.>>Girl in Blue: What
was your favorite time when you hosted the Tony awards?>>Neil Patrick Harris:
When I was done. [ Laughing and Applause ] 11:05. Have you watched
those Tony award things? They were so — that
is the crazy — I never thought in my life that I would be hosting an award
show honoring Broadway musicals. I was a kid from small-town New
Mexico that didn’t even know that Broadway musicals
existed until I heard of a show called Les Miserables,
and I went to see it, it was this epic show,
and the stage spun around, which was new back then. And there was a barricade
that came on. It spoke about the French — it was so cool, and
from that point forward, I went to New York,
and I just saw a bunch of shows every chance I
could, and then, suddenly, I was on a CBS TV show,
and wouldn’t you know, the Tony’s are on CBS? So, I was able to be in the
small pool of people considered for hosting the gigs,
cross-promotion, and so, I got to do it, and it is my
favorite award show to watch. It’s my favorite award
show to be a part of, because you’re honoring
people who really work very, very diligently, eight times
a week, twice on two days, and they perform
these ensemble members who change their costumes and
play seven different characters and dance like you’ve never
seen before, and they do it for not much money and
for not many people, for maybe 1000 people. And it’s unbelievable when
you see a show, and you think like how do they do
that every single night? Well, the Tonys, they get
one night where they do it for a million people, more. And they get to do — and so,
you’re sitting in the show at home, and you’re
watching these people who are so appreciative to be there, to perform the best
number from their show. It’s a big advertisement,
in a way, for them, but deservedly so, and they’ve
all worked with each other. So, it’s nice in the audience. There’s no feuds going on. You know what I mean? It’s not like, “Oh, there’s
the Game of Thrones cast. Oh, look, it’s Downton Abbey.” [ Laughing ] They’re like, “Oh! Bernadette Peters!” So, because that, the
energy’s really good, and is just a fun thing to
do, to be PT Barnum went to get this they now look
it this amazing show. You thought that was cool. Now look at this amazing so. Since I like — well,
you see me. I’m like Tigger. I like being a host because I
get to then do opening numbers. So, I got to do that one
opening number when they moved from a smaller theater,
The Beacon, to Radio City Music Hall, and that was a big,
giant space, right. And so, it seemed like, well there’s your
opening number something about how big we are now
that we’re here, and so, Lin-Manuel Miranda who
— this was pre-Hamilton, the musical, not the…guy. He wrote this song called
figure, and it involved so many people from
all the shows. And there were so many — I
did a magic trick within it. And there were so many
things that really, really could’ve gone wrong. We could spend an hour and
a half talking about all of the things that
really, legitimately, almost went terribly
wrong, and in turn, they made me jump
through a hoop. There is a paper
hoop was this big. I’m rehearsing with Pippin’
the Pippin cast, and they say, “We have this good idea. Why don’t you just jump to run
and yield jump through this hoop like Pippin does in the show?” And I said okay. How does that work?>>Roswell Encina: I do remember
you popping up at the very and from the back of the
theater and running up front.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Yeah,
but I said how does this work, this whole — and they
said, well, you just run and jump through the hoop. [ Laughing ] I said, really? That’s all you do, and they
said, yeah, just commit, run, jump, hurtle right through
it, and I said this is going to be a terrible meme. This is going to be the
worst gif ever when I’m like so excited and
confident, bonk. Bonk. Thankfully,
that didn’t happen, and it turned out
to be just great. That was so fun. I love the Tonys, and I could
talk about them for ages.>>Roswell Encina: Would
you consider doing it again?>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Yeah, I would love to. I would love to. It was really — you
know, it’s a big — it’s much more corporate
than just picking a host, and James Cordon, who is on CBS, doing a late-night hosting
dig has won a Tony himself for brilliant performance in a play called One
Man, Two Governors. He’s hilarious. He can sing. Super talented. So, a great host at the moment. But if I ever got the chance, I would get beat Angela
Lansbury’s record. [ Laughing ] I’m coming for you.>>Roswell Encina: All right, I
think we have time like for one or two more questions.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
One for you, miss. Love it.>>Roswell Encina: This
kid is really excited up here, so, yeah.>>Neil Patrick Harris: I
never should never have said that about Angela — oh,
you’re switching seats. That’s so sweet.>>Roswell Encina: This
kid’s very excited.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Oh, man, yeah you are. What up? You’re so tall.>>Roswell Encina:
And he’s arms –>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Oh, you’re standing. Got it. What your name?>>Elliot: I”m Elliot.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Hey,
Elliot, how old are you?>>Elliot: Eleven.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Eleven, cool. What your question?>>Elliot: have you ever
written a book about an animal? [ Laughing ]>>Roswell Encina: Is a
monkey in book two, right?>>Neil Patrick Harris: Yeah,
there’s a few animals within, but do you mean just
in my spare time? Just like in a –>>Elliot: Like at all. Have you ever?>>Neil Patrick Harris: No, but can I ask me a
follow-up question? And I might ask you
the same thing. If I were to write a
book about an animal, what animal would I
choose to write about? I’m going to choose a dolphin. I love dolphins. They look like they’re smiling
all the time, and when they’re in the wild, they just jump up and do backflips,
what a cool life. And they eat sushi all the time. What would you choose?>>Elliot: Probably a fox.>>Neil Patrick Harris: A fox? Tell me why.>>Elliot: O they’re cool
and pretty and like creepy and like the fastest animals. [ Laughing ]>>Neil Patrick Harris: Totally. [ Laughing ] Years is the way
better answer than mine. Nice. Good question.>>Roswell Encina: All right,
let’s do one more question.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Okay.>>Roswell Encina: I’ll give
you the honors of picking.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Oh my goodness. Everyone’s pointing to this
lovely young girl in the back with the peach dress on. Hiya. How are you.>>Girl in Peach
Dress: I’m good.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
What your name?>>Girl in Peach Dress: Basil.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Basil. What a lovely name
and a delicious herb. But your question?>>Basil: Out all the Misfits,
what is your favorite misfit?>>Neil Patrick Harris: Out of all the misfit,
who is my favorite? Well, that’s a very
interesting question. Probably most like Carter, but
I think my favorite one to write for is Ridley, because she has a
really kind of dark sensibility, but you know that
she’s also very kind and that there’s a heart there,
and I can’t wait for her story to be, you know, more
fully fleshed out. It’s hard to choose
though, you know? Because they’re all different. They all provide different
elements of a bigger, complete picture for me. So, yeah, probably those two. Oh no, or Theo, no, Leila. Not Izzy and Ollie. [ Laughing ] Their comedy is terrible.>>Roswell Encina: So,
before we let you go –>>Neil Patrick Harris: Thank
you for asking that question.>>Roswell Encina: Have you
guessed what my card is yet? [ Laughing ]>>Neil Patrick Harris:
That’s how we’re going to end? With you reminding me that
I failed at that card trick? It really wasn’t the eight of
— I could do one more thing, but I’ll try and do a
mentalism thing again. I would do a card trick, but that went terribly
wrong the first time. Why don’t I try and do
mentalism and get people to see if I can come up with things that people are thinking
in their head. But I don’t want to
just pick random people. So, I have a random number
generator that I brought with me, it’s also called a die that I stole from
a Monopoly game. So, what I’m going to do,
I can hand this to someone. I’m going to hand it to you. And what I’d like you
to do is handed — do you know either of those
two gentlemen behind you? No. Will you hand
it to one of them? Yeah? All right, cool,
have we met before? Do you work here? Yeah, so I feel like people
may think that we know — the woman next to you, we’ve
never met before, have we? Oh, my gosh. This front row. Who have I not — you, sir? You’ve never heard of me. [ Laughing ] Okay, perfect. Will you stand up. This is perfect. Hiya.>>Charlie: I feel
like a target now.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Yeah, what your name?>>Charlie: Charlie.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Charlie, how are you, good?>>Charlie: Good.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Okay,
so here’s what I want you to do. You have a die in your hand. And I’m going to —
instead of reading your mind by picking a number, which
I don’t think one can do, I’m going to come up with
something to associate something to each number, and
then I’m going to have you randomly select
a number, and then I’ll try and figure out if I can figure
out what you have chosen. So, let’s pick a place, like
the location, a city, okay? So, hand the microphone
off, because I need both of your hands for this. Cover the die in your hands, and
I want you to shake your hands, and it’s going to
land on a number. And I want you to peek at the
number, and the number’s going to be the one that’s
facing up, obviously, right? Do you have that? Can you show someone
so they don’t think that you’re [inaudible]. Okay, perfect, so, what
I’m going to do is, if it’s the number one,
let’s say it’s London. If it’s the number two,
let’s say it’s Paris. Number three, let’s
say, Washington DC. Four, let’s say let’s
say it’s Orlando. Five is Los Angeles, and
six would be Albuquerque, where I’m from, okay? So, you heard of all of those. I want you to think of the town
that aligned with your number. You got it? You thinking of it? Okay, this is interesting,
because as I said those, I kind of looked around,
but I saw that kind of your posture changed
a little bit. Ooo-la-la, was it Paris? Nice very good, awesome. All right, cool. Hand it to somebody else. Hand the die is somebody else. How about this gentleman
with the beard? We don’t know each other, do we? Okay, cool, would you stand up. You don’t need the
microphone; it’s okay. What is your name?>>Brad: Brad.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Brad, cool. All right, I want
you to do this again. I want you to, yeah, shake
it up, and you’ll come up with a number,
and now, instead, why don’t we do — I
don’t know, colors. No, let’s do food,
because I’m starving. Okay, take a gander at the
number that you’ve thrown. It’s the one that’s
on top, right? And why don’t you show
— is that your daughter? I don’t want to think that
you could changing your mind. You don’t trust her. Okay, okay, well — it’s okay. Wow. No family drama here. Okay, so, food. Let’s say one is burgers. Two is ice cream. Thee is sushi. Four would be chicken. Five would be — what
is also delicious? Pork chops. Six would be pizza. Here, we’ll do it a
little bit differently. This time, I want you to
— I want you to lie to me. I want you to say, the food
I chose is, and pick one of the different ones, not
the one that you chose, right? Does that make sense? So, say it to me now. Say, “I chose,” and then tell
me, and mean it, but lie to me. Say I chose but not the one
that’s your actual food, but say a different one>>Brad: I chose sushi.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Interesting. You didn’t choose sushi. [ Laughing ] You chose a pizza. Nice! Two for two, baby. I’m going to try one more time. One more time, I want to try it. Hand the dice —
the die over again. You want to take it? Why don’t you, in the green? Okay, cool, why don’t
you stand up? What’s your name?>>Chris: Chris.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Chris, all right, we’re going to try this again. This time let’s do a person,
like a celebrity person. Okay, so shake it up. This time, though,
you know what, instead of just being random,
I don’t want people to think that the die is tricky. So, and that it’s weighted
or something, and it’s going to land in a certain position. So, instead, you can look,
and you can turn the die so that the one you
want is face up, right? So, you’re actually
picking the number. You got that?>>Chris: Yep.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Interesting. Okay, let’s put a
person for each number. Number one, let’s
make Oprah Winfrey. Number two, let’s
make Taylor Swift. Number three let’s
make — I need help. What are good people? [ Multiple Speakers ] Angela Lansbury is good. [ Laughing ] Number four, Barack Obama. Too soon? [ Cheers and Applause ] Number five, Nick Jonas. [ Laughing ] And number six, Barney
Stinson, yes! [ Applause and Laughter ] All right, think of the
person that’s associated with the number, okay? I’m sort of — I don’t
think it’s a female. I think I’m sort of torn between
Barney Stinson, Nick Jonas — oh, you blinked when I
said — was it Nick Jonas. Nice! [inaudible],
thank you very much. [ Applause ]>>Roswell Encina: Good catch.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Thank you. [ Applause ]>>Roswell Encina: Cool.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Oh, wait. Wait a minute. Wait one second. Before this started I
was in the Omaha room, I handed the guy an
envelope, didn’t I? Can we still see it?>>Roswell Encina:
Oh, there it is.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Awesome! Awesome. Okay, this’ll
be so great. Okay, wait, so you
have an envelope. Do you microphone, too? Can I hear you?>>Man: Is it working? Yes. Was, and it is again.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Oh, I can’t hear you. [ Sighing Heavily ] [ Laughing ] Is his mic on? Oh, that’s working. Whatever you’re doing
there is actually working.>>Roswell Encina:
Oh, we can’t hear him.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Oh, we can’t hear you.>>Roswell Encina:
Rush over here.>>Neil Patrick Harris: What
a buzz kill this will be. Okay, well, you know what? We can’t hear you
with the microphone. No, I think I know I
think you can hear — oh, now someone’s singing. That’s exciting. No, I’ll tell you what we’ll do. You’re holding in your hand,
just pantomime it with me, because it’ll be great, and I’m
hoping that this camera can zoom in a little bit, and we’ll
all read the prediction that I’ve written inside this
envelope, can you open it up? Oh, he can’t hear me. [ Laughing ] This works so well
and dress rehearsal. Hey, why don’t you
— no, wait, wait. Why doesn’t he come over here? Don’t have them open it,
have him come over here, Tim.>>Man: You want
to go down there?>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Have him come over. To have him come over to me. Run.>>Man: Just tell
him to come over.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Hurry, run. Run like the wind. [ Applause ] [ Applause ] I knew I gave him this
piece of paper for a reason. He’ll be here in
about 12 minutes. So…>>Roswell Encina:
While we’re waiting –>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Yes, sir.>>Roswell Encina: I know
Halloween’s around the corner, and you and your
family are known for these marvelous
hollowing costumes.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Thank you.>>Roswell Encina:
Do you have an idea yet what you guys are doing?>>Neil Patrick Harris: Hey! [ Applause ] You made it! Bravo! Hey, come up on stage. Come up on stage. This is fantastic. Okay, so, tell me
your name again.>>Justin: Justin.>>Neil Patrick Harris: Justin. Neil, nice to see you. So, Justin, did you guys
see in the beginning? So, did you hear then? So, I handed you this.>>Justin: Yes.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
And it has been sealed. No one touched it this
whole time, and inside, now open it up, it’s
taped on the top. There’s a little — okay, great. And inside this bag is a letter
that I wrote earlier today, and Justin, will you read it?>>Justin: I will be happy to. “Hiya, last night in my sleep,
I dreamt that Nick Jonas was in Paris France, eating
a slice of pizza, OXNP.>>Neil Patrick Harris: P.S.>>Justin: Roswell chose
the four of hearts.>>Neil Patrick Harris: What? [ Laughter and Applause ] Is that right?>>Roswell Encina: Yes.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Was of the four of hearts?>>Roswell Encina: Yes, it was. [ Applause and Cheers ]>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Thanks, man. Nice to meet you.>>Roswell Encina:
Well, that was awesome. So, ladies and gentlemen,
Neil Patrick Harris. Thank you, guys.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
And say hello. I’ll sign some stuff.>>Roswell Encina:
So, don’t go anywhere. While Neil’s getting ready
upstairs to sign your books, I need you to get
set up upstairs.>>Neil Patrick Harris:
Yes, sir. We’ll see you in a second. [ Cheering ]>>Roswell Encina: Special
instructions for everyone, so you have to listen. This goes to everyone in
the overflow room, too. So, if you bought books, their special instructions
for all of you. So, to join the line
upstairs — I need my glasses. When you purchased your book and
the copy of The Magic Misfits, The Minor Third, this evening, it came along with
like a ticket. The ticket will tell
you where you are in line along with a group. So, Neil will be signing
any book that you bring up, but he won’t be signing
any memorabilia. No photos will be taken,
and all this will be going on on the second
floor of the library. So please go up. If you have your book,
bring it up there. If you still need to buy a book,
Politics & Prose is outside. Thank you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *