Hymn of the Nations, 1944

Hymn of the Nations, 1944


♪ [music] ♪ ♪ [music] ♪ [Narrator] Every week, the magic of radio brings the music of Arturo Toscanini to millions of Americans. America has taken Toscanini to its heart. Not only as a musician of unmatchable talent,
but also as a champion of democracy. In his house above the Hudson River near New
York, he has found a haven of freedom for his children and grandchildren. But his thoughts have never been far from
his beloved Italy. ♪ [music] ♪ Americans know that this son of a soldier
of Garibaldi refused to allow his music to become the servant of tyrants. They know that 20 years ago, he took his stand
against the tyranny of fascism in his own land. When the fascist rose to power in Germany,
Toscanini withdrew from Beirut. When Austria was forced into the right, Toscanini
was heard no more at Salzburg. And when the night of fascism darkened most of continental Europe, he brought his music and his democratic faith to the new world. He was not alone. Other Italians who preferred exile to slavery
were carrying on the fight in America. Gaetano Salvemini, the historian, lectured to young Americans in the classrooms of Harvard University G.A. Borgese at the University of Chicago, taught
American boys and girls to understand and love Italian literature. And some kept the dream of a free Italy alive
through the press. In New York, Giuseppe Lucas, Aurelio NaTorre,
Carro Apratto fought fascism with their pens. So did Colonel Randolph Opachardi,
soldier and editor. Dan Strutzel, priest, and patriot, preached
democracy in the Christian ideal from his repute in Florida. For 20 years, these men had waited, fought,
and hoped. [bell rings] [Man] We interrupt this program for a special
news bulletin. Rome, July 25th. The first of the access tyrants has been deposed. Benito Mussolini has been removed as dictator
of Italy. Italy has thrown off the fascist yoke and
is free at last of the tyranny, which has betrayed and enslaved her. This is the day for which millions of Americans
of Italian descent have been waiting. – This is the day Arturo Toscanini had his
answer ready, and his answer was music. ♪ [music] ♪ – Giuseppe Verdi’s Hymn of the Nations, music
not for Italy alone, but for all the nations united in freedom. The maestro himself edited Verdi’s score to
honor the great free allies of today. At the broadcasting studio, they prepared
to put the great music on the air. With the American tenor Jan Peerce as soloist,
the Westminster College Choir, and the NBC Symphony Orchestra. Verdi composed the hymn to celebrate Italy’s
struggle to free herself from foreign domination. It was performed at the International Exposition
in London in 1862. Arturo Toscanini had last conducted it in
Italy in 1915 during another war forced on civilization by the German militarists. Now from New York, the music went out to celebrate
Italy’s new renaissance in freedom. ♪ [music] ♪ ♪ [music] ♪ [opera singing] ♪ [music] ♪ ♪ [music] ♪ [opera singing] ♪ [music] ♪ ♪ [music] ♪ [opera singing] ♪ [music] ♪ ♪ [music] ♪ [opera singing] ♪ [music] ♪ [singing] ♪Oh, say, can you see, by the dawn’s early light, ♪ ♪ What so proudly we hailed, At the twilight’s
last gleaming, ♪ ♪ Whose broad stripes and bright stars,
Through the perilous fight, ♪ ♪ O’er the ramparts we watched, Were so
gallantly streaming, ♪ ♪ And the rockets’ red glare, The bombs
bursting in air, ♪ ♪ Gave proof through the night that our
flag was still there.♪ ♪ O say, does that star-spangled banner
yet wave ♪ ♪ O’er the land of the free ♪and the home ♪ ♪of the♪ ♪brave ♪

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