EHAP Nationalism Project – Germany

EHAP Nationalism Project – Germany


This is our germany nationalism project. Germany was unified under the leadership of our first main historical figure, Otto von Bismarck, who served as chancellor from 1862 to 1890. Bismarck relied on realpolitik to serve his state’s practical needs above all else, and he used nationalism and liberal reforms to maintain a conservative, absolutist rule, resulting in the first highly progressive welfare state. Through his “Bismarck’s Wars” and policies of annexation and hostility, in 1871, a single nation we know as Germany came into existence. He was a master at foreign policy, playing his cards at the right times and establishing the Bismarckian system of diplomacy with countries like Russia. He managed to create the largest simultaneous industrial hub and military power in Europe. Bismarck’s domestic policy was slightly less effective, such as the relative failure of his Kulturkampf against the Church and made enemies out of Catholics and socialists. Our other major figure was Eduard Bernstein, the first evolutionary socialist. In 1872, Bernstein joined the German Social Democratic Party, or the SDP, and was soon elected member of the Reichstag or the lower chamber of Parliament. As a pacifist, democratic socialist (unlike his radical contemporaries), he founded evolutionary socialism or revisionism. Bernstein argued that socialism was the result of liberalism in human aspiration, not simply as a response to capitalism he didn’t see the bourgeoisie as evil and didn’t believe in the collapse of capitalism. nstead, he advocated for factory legislation and labor unions that would benefit the people, as well as in steady progress through democratic institutions rather than a violent revolution. In his work The Preconditions of Socialism, he argued that due to better legislation and progress, capitalism was able to overcome issues like unemployment, overproduction, inequality, social conditions, and worker’s rights. Through universal suffrage by electing representatives, the working class could alleviate their misery. The first important innovation coming out of Germany was Daimler’s light engine, one of the first commercially viable internal combustion engines emerging from the Second Industrial Revolution. It was invented in 1885 by Daimler and was later fitted to a two-wheeler — the first internal combustion motorcycle a stagecoach, and a boat in the following years. Most importantly, this revolutionized transportation in several ways. First, car design was improved in speed, size, and efficiency with the first vehicle powered with an internal combustion engine, the Reitwagon Second, gasoline and liquid petroleum products were finally utilized as fuel. This resulted in the first commercially viable automobiles and the Daimler company, which rolled out its first Mercedes before the turn of the century, thereby launching the automobile industry and pushing forward industrialization and improvement of material standards. Daimler was also known for his system of inspections to maintain the quality of production of vehicles. The second innovation was more culturally involved: Nietzche’s proto-existentialism. Nietzche was a philosopher who paved the way for atheism by rejected God and embraced nihilism. He defined the ascetic ideal, which is that many philosophies and beliefs center around maximizing the feeling of importance and power. Traditional philosophy promised hope for salvation and that the mere existence of an individual requires deep explanation. However, Nietzsche believed that nihilism would triumph when only a sense on meaninglessness and purposelessness would be left. He believed that life doesn’t possess any intrinsic value, but that the exemplary human must find their own identity without relying on God. This, he defined as the Ubermensch, who was a superman who would rise above conventional morality and impose his own values. His work would eventually lead to the rise of existentialism. Our motto is “leaving our Bis-mar(c)k in iron and blood,” which references the political climate of Germany and its impact on Europe at the time. This was largely due to Otto von Bismarck’s actions as Prussian prime minister and later chancellor of Germany. Bismarck was able to unify Germany through a series of strategic wars, which left a lasting impression on Europe as a whole in addition, the mentioning of “iron and blood” is a reference to Bismarck’s speech on the unification of Germany that emphasized realpolitik, which dominated Bismarck’s policies. This motto is meant to emphasize our sentiment for unification, and how it was accomplished. The Song of the Germans” has been the national anthem of Germany since 1922 e German linguist and poet Fallersleben wrote the lyrics as a new text for that music, counterposing the national unification of Germany to the eulogy of a monarch, lyrics that were considered revolutionary at the time Along with the flag of Germany, which first appeared in its essentially “modern” form in 1778, it was one of the symbols of the March Revolution of 1848. And for the grande finale! Unity, Justice and Freedom For the German Fatherland. For these let us all work and strive United with Heart and hand. Unity, Justice and Freedom Are the pledges of our Land. Flourish in our lands beloved blessings Flourish O German Fatherland! Flourish in our lands beloved blessings Flourish O German Fatherland! so cute Germanyyy alright im done ok thanks for watching!

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