Am I Enough? | Episode 3 | Truth Be Told

Am I Enough? | Episode 3 | Truth Be Told


(light music) – [Narrator] Support for
Truth Be Told comes from The East Bay Community Foundation and Berkeley Repertory Theatre. – [Tonya] Hey this is Tonya,
host of Truth Be Told. Before we start this episode, I want to talk about the
term ‘people of color’. We use it a lot to describe
who this show is for. I’m a Black woman, my
producer is Korean-Spanish, and my editor is South Asian American. We’re women of color, but let’s be real, the ‘of color’ part is hella problematic. Sometimes it feels like
a way to erase blackness. But, for this show we use
the term with intention. It’s a small but significant
attempt to reclaim ‘people of color’, to
bring it back to what Black women activists
in the 1970s envisioned. So with that in mind, let’s
get into this week’s episode, which is all about how we
identify, and feeling enough. (upbeat music) There’s this scene in
the iconic movie “Selena” that really speaks to the
question were taking on in this episode of Truth Be Told. – [Edward James Olmos] We gotta
know about Oprah and Cristina. Anglo food is too bland and
yet, when we go to Mexico, we get the runs. Now, that to me is embarrassing. – [J. Lo] Dad! – [Edward] And we gotta
prove to the Mexicans how Mexican we are and we gotta prove to the Americans how American we are. We gotta be more Mexican than the Mexicans and more American than the Americans, both at the same time. It’s exhausting! Man! – [Tonya] Man, Edward
James Olmos breaks it down in this clip! What he’s saying spea ks to
what it’s like to be a person of color in the United States,
even if you were born here. The back and forth of dual identities, where you’re not quite seen as one thing, but you aren’t that other thing either. It can have many of us asking, am I Latina enough? Asian enough? Indigenous enough? Black enough? Am I enough? – [Male Voiceover] Dear Truth Be Told. – [Male Voiceover] Dear Truth Be Told. – [Female Voiceover] Truth
be Told, I need your help! – [Am I Enough] You know
usually when I tell people I am Mexican, I was born in
Mexico, but raised in the US, they say, “Oh, well you don’t look Latina. “You don’t look Mexican.” So sometimes I feel like
I am not Latina enough, like my Mexican identity is
sort of stripped a little. – [ Tonya] This quandary comes
from someone we’re calling ‘Am I Enough’ and to explore
this, we called up two brilliant badass women in East L.A. – [Mala] So I’m Mala Munoz. – [Diosa] And I’m Diosa Femme. – [Mala] And we are Los
Locatoras of Locatora radio. – [Diosa] A radiophonic novella which is a really, really extra way of saying… – [Mala] A podcast. It’s a podcast. – [Tonya] You know I would
steal that if you all hadn’t already done it. – [Mala] Well you know we’re
Latina so we just couldn’t like leave the name at podcast. We had to have a little flourish. – [Diosa] To be super extra about it. – [Mala] And we call it
a radiophonic novella because there is a
narrative arc to the podcast and to each capitulo and it really has to
do with just our lives and our lived experiences. – [Tonya] Diosa and Mala joined
us from the community studio Espacio 1839, and it’s a happening place. So, you’ll sometimes hear people and music in the background. So our question comes from a woman we’re calling ‘Am I Enough’. (bells chime) – [Am I Enough] Dear Truth Be Told, I am a Mexican American
woman living in the Bay Area, but I was born in Mexico. I moved here when I was 2 years old and I identify as Latina. But I found that depending on where I go, I have always had to perform or act out my Mexican Latina identity in some way. All this to say, sometimes
it’s made me feel like I’m somehow not Latina enough, which is really kind of
confusing and painful because it’s like why
won’t my own people see me? You know usually when I
tell people I’m Mexican they say, “Oh, well
you don’t look Latina.” “You don’t look Mexican.” And then when I talk Spanish too, my accent is not from Mexico. It’s like Americanized. So then I get embarrassed and sometimes I don’t
even want to talk Spanish with my own like Latino Mexican friends that are here, you know? So I get a little uncomfortable and just kind of detach
from that a little bit. Like my Mexican identity is
sort of stripped a little. Like I want to be confident, but sometimes I get a little intimidated. It’s hurtful, it’s a little hurtful. Truth Be Told, what can I
do to better understand this and how can we navigate these situations when they are happening? (phone buttons beeping) – [Mala] I definitely appreciate the piece about depending on where you are, right, like reception of you will change. But I think that also
speaks to something too about being ethnically ambiguous or being racially ambiguous
and having that fluidity because I think that folks who
are, you know, unmistakably, undeniably black or
unmistakably, undeniably brown and Indigenous and of color, you know, are not necessarily
gonna have that fluidity. Like I’ve experienced that too, you know. – [Tonya] Absolutely. – [Mala] Every single time I’ve
ever been to New York City, ’cause I went to college in Massachusetts, I always heard from men
of color in particular, I always heard, “Oh like what are you?” “Are you mixed with something?” And this sort of thing
that’s supposed to be like a compliment, because it points to some type of like ambiguity. You know, like, those
things have happened to me. – [Tonya] Right, right. Like that’s a compliment. They’re saying that to you
like it’s a compliment, yeah. – [Mala] Right, and what they’re doing is they’re putting down my
community in a false attempt to like lift me up, right? And so, I have to also stand in that and say well this is because
I look the way that I do and I’m light skinned
and I have to reject it. You know, I have to reject it and I have to know that this
is not a positive thing. And I think that there’s
some work, personal work, that has to be done there as well and understanding like that fluidity. This isn’t our favorite topic, but it’s because of the
way that it’s usually, like the energy… – [Diosa] Behind it. – [Mala] When a Latina,
a LatinX person says, “Oh, I don’t feel Latina enough,” the energy behind that
is kind of off sometimes. What I mean is like, often
like I feel that folks who say that, and this coming
from a place of experience, are coming from a, living
in a place of privilege as a LatinX person. This person is likely to be someone who is an American citizen,
who is English speaking, and who is probably lighter skinned. And so instead of examining,
like, the power dynamics in our community and the fact
that me having these elements is a humongous privilege over like lots of other members of my community. And I remember kind of
having those feelings of maybe this is what
it feels like to think I’m not Latina enough, but what I was really identifying was like discomfort over the fact
that community members who maybe like were not citizens or who did have a Spanish
accent who when they spoke or who spoke fluent Spanish, I felt dumber, right, and like less quick-witted and less able to communicate
in multiple languages. It wasn’t not being Latina enough, it was pointing out
that like, there’s a lie in this like American
dream, Americanization. I’m not better in any way. It’s actually pointing out
a feeling of inadequacy and lacking when we’re not growing up in our home countries in some ways. – [Tonya] Yeah, because you’re
you’re basically saying, too, that you have to
own up to your privilege. – [Diosa] Yeah, yeah, I mean
I sympathize, empathize, with this person that says, you know it sounds you know really painful for when she says why
won’t my own people see me. I think if anything for me growing up, more of my coming to
understanding of being enough of something has definitely
been more through my sexuality than as opposed to my Latinidad. I was outed when I was 15
and because I am very femme, I’m very femme presenting,
I very much felt that I wasn’t queer enough. You know, there are privileges
to having being perceived as straight in many spaces, and at the same time there
is femme invisibility within the queer community. So I very much had a phase
when I was you know wearing the rainbow flag or had a
rainbow flag bracelet, right, ’cause it was very over-the-top because I wanted people to know that I was of the queer community. And then later on understanding those things don’t make me queer, right? And my identity transforming,
identifying as once a lesbian to then queer to then bisexual doesn’t make me any less queer and it doesn’t make my
experience any less authentic based on who my partner is. So I think that for me has been
much more of a conversation with, for myself and within my
family has been my queerness. So, I like want to honor that honor her and that feeling that she’s having. But it very much is
rooted in her privilege. You know, that she has that option to really flow in and out of
spaces without being seen. – [Mala] And we forget,
or ignore the fact, that we have members of
our community who are Black or who are Asian or who are Muslim, right? And so there’s tons of community members who are not gonna be seen and recognized. But the question is, why are you not being seen or recognized? Is it because you’re Afro-Mexican? Are are you not seen as Mexican because you are white looking? Or are you not seen as Mexican because you are Muslim, right? And so there’s going to
be like a root there. But if you are Muslim, and not
being recognized as Mexican, that’s not a privilege. That’s, that’s a very
violent erasure, right? If you’re whiter looking and you’re not being seen as Mexican that’s a privilege, if you are in the United States, you know? (upbeat music) – [Mala] You know, like identity is hard and it’s a process. And when your community
is not embracing you and accepting you it can be really tough, but we need to be a little
bit self-reflective sometimes and ask ourselves, like, what
are we giving the community? What are we giving the community? What’s being reflected back to us? Because I like to give, you know, the community some credit
sometimes, in like, in like, I don’t know, in giving you what you give the community, sometimes. You know, communities can be toxic and communities can shut folks out, and be mean and all that
stuff and homophobic and colorist and sexist, but
sometimes we have to, like, ask ourselves, like what am I putting in? What am I putting in and how is that being reflected back to me? That’s what I would say. – [Diosa] Yeah, I echo that. I would definitely say to
have some self-awareness about the spaces that she
occupies and navigates. And, yeah I mean I think Mala
you really just summed up, like, really what are you putting out? And what is being given back to you? – [Mala] It’s a journey. – [Diosa] It is a journey, yeah. And you know, like, identity politics can be very toxic. They can be very limiting. They can be very empowering, but they can also be very limiting. So again, you know,
practicing the self-awareness I think is very important. (light music) – [Tonya] Up next, we keep
talking with Diosa and Mala about everything, from J. Lo, y’all know she shouldn’t have
done that Motown tribute, to Central American
Twitter, when we return. (light music) – [Narrator] Support comes from The East Bay Community Foundation, proud sponsor of Truth Be Told. To meet today’s social
and economic challenges, The East Bay Community
Foundation partners with donors, social movements, and the
community to eliminate structural barriers and
create equitable outcomes for all who call the East Bay home. Learn more at EBCF.org. – [Narrator] Support for Truth Be Told also comes from Berkeley
Repertory Theatre. Guided by values of excellence,
relevance, diversity, risk, and stewardship,
Berkeley Rep creates ambitious theater that entertains and challenges its audiences, provokes civic engagement,
and inspires people to experience the world in
new and surprising ways. Currently on stages is, “Kiss
My Aztec”, an irreverent new musical from John Leguizamo, that celebrates modern LatinX culture. Tickets and more at BerkleyRep.org. (light music) – [Tonya] Our discussion about
the ‘am I enough’ question got Mala thinking that maybe, we should be reframing
the way we think about it. – [Mala] I wonder, too, if
like the enough question is also like can we ask
ourselves, like okay, especially with things having
to do with representation, like giving enough space
to underrepresented members of our own POC communities. Right, am I enough, but
also am I sharing enough? And am I put on too much
versus someone else, right? And because– – [Tonya] Break down
that a little bit more. Break that down. – [Diosa] That’s important. – [Mala] There’s something that
needs to be grown out there, but there is a lot of space
sharing that needs to happen. Like I think of, oh my
goodness, like J. Lo. We love J. Lo, but it’s like enough J. Lo! – [Diosa] Yeah. – [Mala] You know, she’s had a she’s had a really long career, a wonderful career. Like she, but she did
like Celia Cruz tribute and it’s like she’s,
she has had enough space and enough visibility. – [Diosa] She did the Motown tribute. – [Mala] And she didn’t need to take– – [Tonya] I know! – [Diosa] She should not have done that. – [Mala] You know, and
that’s the same community, that’s, you know, Latin
American Caribbean. Like, why is the space
being so limited right now? So I would like us to ask those questions in the future when we’re
having the enough conversation. – [Tonya] Yeah, absolutely,
’cause there’s so much privilege in that space for opening it up for those that you know
that are not at the table. Absolutely, J. Lo could
have definitely said, hey look at all of these
Afro Latina creators, or look at all of these
wonderful people of color who are creating things
that you don’t know about, but I want to bring them up to the front. – [Diosa] Absolutely, ’cause
you know we see the same people almost being like the gatekeepers
of the LatinX community, like J. Lo being one of them, Salma Hayek. You know, there’s many more,
but them in particular. – [Mala] Penelope Cruz. – [Diosa] Penelope Cruz, she’s actually not even Latina, she’s Spanish. – [Mala] No but she gets she gets pegged. – [Diosa] She get’s pegged as Latina. – [Mala] And the other
one from Modern Family. – [Diosa] Oh, Sofia Vergara! – [Mala] Sofia Vergara. – [Diosa] Ah, see, I want more for her, I really do, but it’s like– – [Tonya] I do too. – [Mala] And they all kinda look the same. – [Diosa] They all look
the same and it’s like, is that even your accent, or is that just your performative
accent, is what I wonder. That’s a whole different conversation about accents and representation. (Latin music) – [Tonya] Mala, you brought
up language earlier, and for our question asker, I think that’s a big thing for her. – [Am I Enough] When I talk Spanish too, my accent is not from Mexico. It’s like Americanized. So, then I get embarrassed and sometimes I don’t
even wanna talk Spanish with my own like Latino Mexican friends that are here, you know? – [Mala] I think this is important too, to talk about on a community level, especially when we think
about like Mexicentrism and how Mexicans can be
really like sticklers and really kind of, what’s the right word, can be sticklers about
like language purity and making fun of, like, other Spanish speakers
and Spanish accents. And in L.A., in particular, a lot of, like Central American Twitter, a lot of Central American
people who are very active on Twitter talk about how there’s like this language
hegemony in L.A. in particular. There was an article out in
the L.A. Times not too long ago about how, you know,
Central Americans in L.A. often have to pretend to
speak Spanish like Mexicans in order to get jobs. So, I can see– – [Tonya] Really? – [Mala] Yeah, because Mexicans
can be kind of oppressive. – [Diosa] Yeah, well, I
think we know within any Latin American country, you know, nationalism can be so harmful and this is one way that it manifests, is in the language purity. In my family, you know,
on my Peruvian side, it’s you know, I’m too Mexican
and on the Mexican side, I’m like, oh you know
she’s Peruana, or whatever, so very much being in
that kind of in between and it’s something that I embrace right, because it’s who I am and
it’s a part of who I am. But definitely that language
purity, I 100% agree that it is rooted in Mexicentrism, but I think also in nationalism, which is a part of every
Latin American country. I would hope that a
future where we, you know, folks within the Mexican
community can unpack our Mexicentrism and
actually, you know, build and coalesce with other
Latin American folks, Latin American descendants,
especially here in the U.S. because I think that the
Mexicentrism within our community really inhibits us from growing as individuals, and then as
folks within a community. – [Tonya] What advice would you give her, as she navigates and
comes into this herself? – [Mala] So for me, the only
thing that got me to overcome, like, my language barrier and just start speaking the Spanish and just doing it, is I also recognized, like, if I want to connect to my community and be, like, widely accepted
or even just accepted and embraced even in just my family, I need to try, like I have to try. I have to put myself out there. I have to be willing to sound awkward and I have to, like, be willing
to be corrected sometimes, you know, and just kind of
like embrace that humility in some ways, like I’m
making an effort here and even if I stumble, I’m
still, like, working on it. And that’s been my process. And also just owning it too. Like, I’m a Pocha and I talk about that all the time, like– – [Diosa] Yeah, that’s your brand. – [Mala] That’s my brand. I’m like sorry I’m a Pocha and this is how I talk, but you understand what I’m saying. You know, but that’s
just been my own process. To each their own, you know? – I think too like the
conversation about like, we’re in the United States, right, and the conversation of am I Latina enough or am I LatinX enough I
think is also just a very U.S. specific convo, because this identity of Latino, Latina, LatinX is
really only a U.S. identity. Like, if you go into any of, you know, a Latin American country
there is no discussion about oh we’re Latinos. It’s, oh we’re Mexicans, we’re Dominicans, we’re Salvadorans, you
know, we’re Peruvians. – [Diosa] Right. – [Mala] And it’s a U.S. identity. It just inherently is, and Latinidad is an inherently U.S. concept, you know? So, there’s no way to do it wrong, I don’t think, in my opinion. (light music) – [Tonya] What Mala is
saying about U.S. identity got me thinking about how I view myself. When I was a kid, I had these flash cards of black civil rights leaders. And when I’d go through them,
I’d always stop for a beat and stare at the Marcus Garvey card. His Back-to-Africa movement
made me long for a connection to the continent. I still have that longing,
but I’ve grown to feel a lot of pride for who and what I am, a Black American, a tapestry of people who have been here for
more than 400 years. Mala feels the same
way about her heritage. – [Mala] Like I’m third generation
Mexican American Chicana, but I feel like if you are
existing in the United States you are just, and you are
of Latin American descent, I think you can
automatically tap into this Latino identifier, because it
doesn’t exist anywhere else, like it’s to be here, is
to be is to be in this umbrella category and that
has a lot to do with history and, like, U.S., the U.S Census, and how the federal government has categorized us over the
years, you know what I mean? So, I grew up in a household
where it was very mixed, we were speaking Spanglish and grandparent is
speaking to me in Spanish and I’m responding in English and go to any of my family functions and that’s just how everyone is talking. One person is speaking Spanish. The other is responding
in English or Spanglish and that’s just the way that it is. And, me learning that it’s also
about learning your history and how you came to speak
the way that you speak, because my father grew up in
1950s Bakersfield, California, where he used to see signs in
storefront windows that said no dogs or Mexicans allowed, you know? And that parents would
not speak Spanish in front of their kids because their
kids would get beat in school and put in special ed. So, there’s a very
specific reason why my dad did not grow up speaking Spanish and then that trickles
down to where we are today. That is a LatinX experience. That is a Mexican American
Chicano experience. It’s not inauthentic. It’s not Un-Mexican. It’s not anti-LatinX. It is, that is, right? So I am. – [Diosa] And I think, you
said, like, something like a perceived idea or perceived notion of what a quote, like, Mexican is, right? And that would be my follow
up, like enough to whom? You know, who is it that you’re
not enough for, you know? Is it more of like a
caricature understanding of what Mexicanidad is and Latinidad is? That would be my question for this person. – [Mala] It goes back to
the question of performance. What does it mean to
perform that identity, like what are you, what are
you fabricating to fit in? (light music) – [Tonya] Mala and Diosa
gave such useful advice to our question asker, “Am I Enough”, and it really got me thinking
about our own privileges when it comes to this
term, ‘people of color’. I couldn’t let them go
without asking them about it. – [Mala] ‘People of color’
is a political term, right? And if you identify as a person of color, it’s because you identify as someone who is not a white person and
you identify yourself like in a certain type of political solidarity with other people who
are not white people. And that you position yourself
as someone who is seeking to balance the scales or
you have an understanding of racism in the United States. I think that it’s often
sort of people are, are lumped into the
people of color umbrella without also navigating and understanding and recognizing, like, colorism and how racial hierarchies are established in the United States. And I think that sometimes
if you are a person of color, we have to be cognizant too of erasing other people’s experiences, like I see sometimes
like non-Black Latinos talk about all people of color, as if we experience the same things and really erasing anti-Blackness, as its own force and experience. And so, I think that
it’s very, a useful term. I think that there are
some useful connections to be made, but we have
to be careful with it because we can also do a lot of erasing of the realities of like,
xenophobia and anti-Blackness. I can identify as a person of color but I can never, and would
never, compare my experiences to like my undocumented community members or Black community members,
because it’s not the same. – [Diosa] Yeah, and I think that I’ve seen a shift in language from, from folks where they will, when talking
about community members or just communities, I’ve seen the Black,
Indigenous, and people of color, like I’ve seen them,
it’s like be B-I-P-O-C. So I’ve seen that become an
acronym and I think that that’s, it serves the purpose to
really name the differences, but still trying to create some
type of solidarity in a kind of politicized organizing space. But, naming the differences
is also important, right? Because then we’re not erasing folks. (light music) – [Tonya] To break this
down a little more, I decided to visit author
and journalist Jeff Chang. We met in his office at Race Forward, a racial justice organization
in the heart of Oakland. He’s written a lot about
what it means to be a person of color, how it’s
rooted in resistance. – [Jeff] Our histories are not the same. Native genocide, slavery, enslavement of folks of African
descent are not comparable to the immigrant experience. The term people of color, in
that sense hides over a lot of those types of things and masks over those types of things. And yet it also expresses a
kind of sense of an identity that is also very much
rooted in the Bay Area. This anticolonial idea, this sort of resistance to imperialism. This resistance to the
ways in which whiteness has been employed historically to actually exclude folks
who are not deemed white. The notion of people of color
isn’t so that we can replace white people with people of color, right? It’s that we can actually
recognize the harms that have been done to people
of color so that we can have a society that’s equitable
and just for all. And I really think that that’s
something that we have to grapple with and struggle with. You know, those of us
who are are not black, who are not queer, who are
not women, who are cis, who are able-bodied, we have to recognize that we have privileges in
those kinds of situations. And so the point is not about
trying to attain some perfect kind of performance of
Asianess or Chinese-Hawaiianess or that kind of thing. The point is to be able
to live and be as human and express yourself in all the ways that you can possibly express yourself. There’s no absoluteness,
like we shouldn’t try to live in pure worlds. It’s really about trying
to understand what it means to be able to attain a sense of wholeness and happiness in one’s own skin. Those of us who are
identified as people of color, it’s about moving past this dead end, this cycle of hatred and
revenge and war and segregation and separation of people
into those who are superior and those who are inferior right? It’s not about creating
new systems of inferiority and superiority of access
and denial of access. It’s not about that at all,
it’s about moving out of that binary into something brand new. Well, we got a lot of work to do, y’all and we have to deal with
questions of power and privilege. But, like, let’s fight the power
and privilege where it lies and let’s not police each other
in our attempts to become. (light music) – [Tonya] You know Damon Young, the co-founder of the
site Very Smart Brothas? Well, he recently wrote a book called “What Doesn’t Kill You,
Makes You Blacker”. And that really sums up my
feelings about my identity. I’m blacker and bolder
than I’ve ever been, and it’s true, there
were a lot of internal and external battles to get to here. So to Am I Enough, as Mala
from Las Locatoras said, what you are is uniquely Mexican American, and that in itself is its own identity. Embrace it. And you know what? We’re often talking about
having difficult discussions with white people, but it’s
really important that we, Black, Brown, Indigenous and Asian folks, continue the legacy of
solidarity that Jeff mentioned and talk to each other. So, this conversation isn’t over. Hit us up on Twitter
and tell us about your Am I Enough stories, and how you’re getting
through those feelings. I’ve got a few I’ll be
sharing over there too. Just at us @truthbetoldshow. (light music) On our next episode of Truth be Told, how do you deal with
well meaning white people who wear the concept of being
woke as a badge of honor? – [Gene Demby] Tanner Colby
wrote a book a couple of years ago called “Some of My Best
Friends are Black”, and he was like, I live in Brooklyn at
the time, I voted for Obama, and he was looking around and he’s like, yo, do any of us actually
know any black folks? – [Tonya] That’s next
time on Truth be Told. And while you are listening
on Apple podcasts, NPR One, YouTube, or wherever you get your shows, please take a second to leave
us a review and a rating. It helps other people find our show. Thank you! (light music) This podcast was produced by Cristina Kim and edited by Sandhya Dirks. Our sound designer is Enrico Benjamin. Thanks to KQED’s head of
podcasts, Julie Caine, KQED’s managing editor
for news Vinnee Tong, executive editor of news, Ethan Lindsey, and chief content officer Holly Kernan. A special thanks to Espacio 1839, not only a clothing and
bookstore representing the culture of Boyle Heights, but a community radio station
in the heart of East L.A. Truth be Told is funded in part by a grant from the California Wellness Foundation. With a commitment to diversity,
equity and inclusion, the foundation’s vision for
every resident of California is to enjoy good health
and experience wellness. Truth be Told is a production
of KQED in San Francisco. I’m Tonya Mosley. Okay, the last question
I have for you (laughs) and how it ended up being the
last question, I don’t know, but what is a multi-dimensional HOE? – [Mala] Yes, thank you! – [Diosa] The best question, yes! – [Mala] The best question. So much that goes into it. So, first of all HOE can
stand for heaven on earth. We can start there. – [Diosa] Heaven on earth. – [Mala] That can be our launchpad. – [Tonya] Heaven on earth! – [Mala] And I think to
be a multi-dimensional HOE is like to reject the confines of, like, patriarchy and rape culture. – [Diosa] And slut shaming. – [Mala] And slut shaming and femme phobia and to say, like, we can
be our full like human sexual selves and everything else. And, I think at the core
of multi-dimensional HOE is like claiming our
selfhood and our autonomy and that no matter what,
like we don’t deserve, it’s speaking back against rape culture. We never deserve to be harmed
or abused or thrown away, because of this, this
categorizing, you know, like this is about reclaiming the body. And also, like, reclaiming
the right to defend the body from harm, especially sexual harm. So I think that’s where a lot of multidimensional HOE comes from. Being a HOE is all about
teaching and spreading knowledge. – [Diosa] Yeah. (light music)

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