A New Nation: Introduction

A New Nation: Introduction


Vorenberg: Really, the most far
reaching and radical dimension of the Constitution occurs
in its first three words, “We the people.” Owens: When the
founding fathers said, “All men shall be
created equal,” they didn’t mean people. They didn’t mean
everybody of every gender. They meant all white men
should be created equal. Hoover: It was really kind of
exclusively about the signers there representing
their greater interests and what they wanted to
see in the new nation. That didn’t include
women and minorities. Vorenberg: African Americans,
Native Americans, women, of course, all of these
people are effectively excluded from the process. Calloway: And without
those alternative and multiple perspectives,
the American story is an impoverished
tale of history. Clark-Pujara: Any
story that doesn’t include them is incomplete. Fisher: For so
long, for too long we have had the voices of
these white male colonial leaders that reverberate down
through the halls of time. We need those voices, but
looking at this time period through different
kinds of lenses and different
perspectives gives us a more nuanced history
that I think is much needed in today’s society. Clark-Pujara: The stories
that are most often told are the ones that make people
feel good, that are uplifting. And often, our
history has been told as what we imagined it to be
rather than what it actually was. Hamlin: So it’s very
important that students are aware of the complexities
in the 18th century in the US and the discussions
that were happening. We have to understand the 18th
century for what it was then, and then sort of interpret the
21st century for what it is now with that knowledge.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *