2019 Stanford International Relations Diploma Ceremony

2019 Stanford International Relations Diploma Ceremony


Good afternoon. Parents, relatives, friends,
and graduates, welcome to Stanford University’s 128 commencement exercises
and to the diploma ceremony of the program in International Relations. My
name is Michael Tomz, I’m a professor of political science and the director of
the international relations program, we are all very proud of what our
international relations graduates have achieved, they have studied the most
difficult challenges facing our world including war, Human Rights, pollution,
poverty, and the governance of the global economy, they have investigated problems
from many angles by completing an interdisciplinary curriculum that
combines political science, history, economics, statistics, and many other
fields. All of our majors have studied abroad and attained proficiency in a
foreign language they are graduating with the knowledge and tools that will
help them achieve excellence in their future careers. I am very pleased to join
you today as we honor our graduates. Today’s ceremony will have three parts
first, Professor Colin Kahl will deliver the keynote address, second two graduating
seniors, Audrey Wynne and Lloyd Lyle, will reflect on their time at Stanford, and
finally, Dr. Erica Gould and Robert ray Cove will read the names of the
graduates and Professor Stephen Stedman will present the diplomas. I will
introduce each of these participants at the appropriate moment in the ceremony. Let me begin by introducing our keynote
speaker professor Colin Kahl, Professor Kahl is the co-director of the Center
for international security and cooperation at Stanford, he
is also the Steven C. Hazi senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for
International Studies and a professor by courtesy of political science. Before
coming to Stanford in 2018, he held professorship at the University
of Minnesota and at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service.
Professor Kahl has researched a wide range of topics, including civil and
ethnic conflict, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear
proliferation. He is also written extensively on
contemporary U.S. foreign and defense policy with a particular focus on the
Middle East. His current research includes a book project examining the
role of the Middle East in American understanding of grand strategy since
9/11. Professor Kahl has also worked at the
highest levels of government on major foreign policy and national security
challenges from 2009 to 2011, he was deputy assistant secretary of defense
for the Middle East at the Pentagon, there, he received from secretary gates
the Secretary of Defense medal for outstanding public service. Professor
Kahl returned to government in 2014 to become deputy assistant to the president
and national security adviser to the vice president. For more than two years,
he advised President Obama and Vice President Biden on all matters related
to U.S. foreign policy and national security affairs.
Professor Kahl grew up in Richmond California and tells me that he’s happy
to be back here in California. He earned a BA in political science from the
University of Michigan and a PhD in political science from Columbia
University, we’ve actually known each other since high school when we met on
the debate circuit, so I can tell you from firsthand experience that he is a
brilliant debater and public speaker so you’re in for
quite a treat today with his keynote address.
Just word of warning don’t try to refute anything that he says. Professor Kahl we
are very fortunate to have you at Stanford, we appreciate your tremendous
service to the university and to our country and we are grateful for your
generosity and addressing the graduates today, Professor Kahl. Well, it’s great to
see all of you. Thank you, thank you Mike for the kind introduction and good
afternoon to my fellow faculty members and most especially to our Stanford
international relations graduates it’s great to see all of you and your
families here on this joyful day and to the debt and to the dads out there in
the audience, happy Father’s Day, all graduations are special: a time to
reflect on your time here at Stanford, all that you’ve learned and all the
relationships that you built with your fellow students, with your teachers, and
with others. But it’s particularly special for me to be able to address
this group of graduating students because you are my people you are my
tribe. You are IR nerds. When I look out at you, I see a
reflection of myself as a graduating senior three decades ago that was a long
time, now it’s true although I grew up right across the bay in Richmond, I never
managed to get into Stanford, in fact I didn’t even managed to get into Cal, but
as an undergraduate I too was passionate about international relations and those
passions drove me towards a career as an academic and policy maker focused on
national security and foreign policy. It’s what brought me back to the Bay
Area after so many years in Washington DC to work at Stanford alongside my
amazing colleagues at CISAC and the Freeman Spogli Institute, and it’s why I
was so thrilled when Professor Tomz asked me to speak to you all today about
these shared passions and how I hope you will channel them in the years and
decades ahead to make a better place- to make the world a better place, to go
forth and to do good things. The headlines that stream across our smart
phones and our tablets, and our laptops these days are full of international
crises, nuclear disputes with Iran and North Korea, trade fights with Mexico
and China, warnings about Russian meddling in our democracy, Brexit.
American leadership on the stage is questioned, our alliances are strained,
our values at home and abroad are under stress and the international rules
institutions and organizations the United States helped build after the
Second World War, the backbone of the so-called liberal international order
seem increasingly inadequate to the tasks of our current century. All of this
matters a great deal, but none of these daily developments are occurring in a
vacuum there are there is a broader context at work and many of the most
important dynamics driving International Affairs run below the surface of these
headlines. Fortunately your education in international relations here at Stanford
has put you in a position to pierce the veil, to see beyond the headlines and the
mass hysteria over the latest presidential tweet, and it is my hope
that your time here at Stanford has put you in a position to help us
collectively respond to the greatest challenges we face. There are several big
trends in drivers shaping the world today that I believe will continue to do
so for decades in fact arguably for the rest of your lives and your professional
careers. So let me say something about four of these trends in particular now
to the parents I have to apologize, this is going to be a bit of the
last lecture for your students, but frankly this is what you pay the big
bucks for. The first key trend I want to talk about is the intersection of
globalization and inequality, the world has seen unprecedented economic
expansion since World War two, improving the lives of billions of human beings,
the combined gross domestic product of all the countries in the world has
expanded from a little more than four trillion dollars after World War two to
more than 85 trillion dollars today, far outpacing population growth and
contributing to rising per-capita incomes across the world.
More than anything, this growth has been fueled by globalization, an exponential
increase in the volume and velocity of services, goods, information, technology,
and people, crossing borders, integrating, communicating, making things and doing
business. Globalization, which reached new heights after the end of the Cold War,
has produced some clear winners, most notably the world’s ultra rich
individuals, it has also helped lift hundreds of millions of other people,
especially those in emerging countries like China and India, out of poverty and
into a burgeoning middle class. But the unfortunate reality is also that a
number of others, in particular, the very poor around the world and the middle
classes in advanced industrial economies including ours have been left behind and
squeezed as creative destruction, market efficiencies, automation, and trade have
displaced jobs, disrupted communities, and produced, in many places stagnant wages.
The result is a mounting global inequality, a rising tide in which too
many boats are sinking consider this one fact. According to the organization Oxfam
in 2017, the eight richest individuals in the world, they all happen to be men, had
a combined wealth of four hundred and twenty six billion dollars; eight people.
That’s equivalent to the poorest half of all human beings on planet Earth.
Startling numbers like that have real consequences: anxiety and
inequality, fueled by globalization are a major driver of rising nationalism,
populism, and grievance based politics, both here in the United States and
around the world, with profound consequences for domestic and
international stability. What’s more we may only be at the front end of the
dislocations brought about by globalization and technology. This brings
me to the second mega trend shaping this century, your century, the digitization of
everything. The rapid growth of computing power in recent decades the creation and
expansion of the Internet and the explosion of mobile communication
devices around the world have driven innovation and produce
extraordinary efficiencies and conveniences. But these changes have also
made our private data vulnerable to exploitation and critical infrastructure
vulnerable to crippling cyber attacks. There is no doubt that the miracle of
having all of the information recorded in history available in your pocket on a
supercomputer -well first of all it’s just cool- but it’s done extraordinary
things, no doubt. It’s also helped to democratize information and empower
civil society in ways that can challenge the status quo, but these same
technologies and devices have also provided new platforms for demagoguery
and disinformation while the enormous amounts of data we produce about
ourselves on a minute-by-minute basis has given corporations and nation-states
new means of surveillance that threaten our civil liberties and, in some
authoritarian countries, have eased repression. Moreover, the overwhelming
amount of information and the proliferation of media and social media
sources has also forced many of us into our own closed networks of trusted
voices to manage the flow resulting in echo chambers for our own beliefs,
depending on what news we read ,what what websites we go, to we almost live in
different worlds and in this ecosystem it’s become increasingly difficult to
discern fact from fiction, between actual fake news, and the news that our
politicians tell us is fake because they don’t like it. Other dramatic advances
and digital technologies are upon us as well, ranging from synthetic biology to
3d printing, the Internet of Things, machine learning, and quantum computing,
all of which are likely to profoundly shape our lives for the remainder of
this century and all of which have a hub here at Stanford. Artificial intelligence
tops that list, in early September 2017 Russian President Vladimir Putin
declared, quote, “Whoever becomes the leader in artificial intelligence will
become the ruler of the world.” unquote. Now to say the least I don’t agree with
Putin on very many things, but the guy might actually be under something here.
There is a reason that China has pledged to invest a hundred and fifty billion
dollars on A.I. by the year 2030. Putin’s remarks and China’s investments
reflect a growing belief that A.I. will fundamentally reshape the global economy,
determine how competitive countries are, and potentially alter the military
balance of power as A.I. transforms everything from intelligence collection
to our ability to use swarms of autonomous drones. The biggest
consequences however are likely be economic, A.I. promises to create enormous
economic expansion, but a major concern is the possibility that A.I. will also
accelerate inequality as a handful of huge corporations reap enormous benefits
and many workers around the world are dislocated by accelerating digitization
and automation. A 2017 McKenzie Global Institute report for example found a
midpoint estimate of 400 million people or 15% of the global workforce that are
likely to be disrupted by automation before 2030 and Price Waterhouse Cooper
estimates that it could be 38% of all jobs in the United States by 2030. 38% of
all jobs in the United States. This will undoubtedly include many blue-collar
workers like factory workers and millions of long-haul truckers and
others displaced by autonomous vehicles, but it’ll also include lawyers and stock
traders and accountants and medical professionals and other skilled
white-collar jobs that could become automated by smarter and smarter
machines. Look I recognize where I’m standing, all right, we’re in Silicon
Valley this is the fount of techno optimism, the belief that all disruption
in at some point is inherently good and I have no doubt that that A.I. won’t just
kill jobs, it’ll create new ones it will create new industry, some we’ve never
even thought about, it’s also the case that an A.I. fueled economic boom could
generate enormous resources for our government to redistribute to those who
are left behind. But the scale and speed of possible disruption leads many
analysts, including myself, to worry that even if there are aggregate gains in the
long term, the transitional challenges and the political challenges could prove
overwhelming. Inequality and economic dislocation
around the world is also complying- combining with failed states, civil wars,
and environmental degradation to contribute to a third major underlying
driver of International Affairs, mass migration. According to the United
Nations, from 2000 to 2017 the number of international migrants worldwide
increased from 173 million to 258 million. Many of them were displaced by
civil war, horrific levels of criminal violence, and environmental
disaster. Indeed, in 2018 just last year the number of internally displaced
persons and refugees totalled almost 69 million people, which is the largest
number of people in that category since World War two. Most refugees go to
neighboring countries, often in the developing world, where they can
create enormous humanitarian and economic burdens. Consider a place like
Lebanon. Before the war in in Syria, Lebanon had a population of four million,
now Lebanon has a population of five and a half million. More than one in five
people in Lebanon is a Syrian refugee imagine if one in five Americans was
suddenly a refugee. As dramatic as statistics like that are most people on
the move are actually not refugees they are people leaving their countries of
origin in search of greater economic opportunity elsewhere and many of them
are finding their way to developed regions in Europe, Asia, and North America.
As circumstances on our southern border attest, the humanitarian implications can
be heartbreaking, the political implications are also significant.
Refugees and migration flows from Africa, the Middle East, and Central Asia to
Europe have clearly contributed to a rising wave of xenophobia, anti-muslim
sentiment, and far-right populism across the European continent. And here, in the
United States, despite being a nation of immigrants that is clearly capable of
absorbing more surging migration from this from Central America, is providing
opportunities for our own politicians to play out our fears, conjuring up images
of invading caravans and marauding criminals crashing across our shores.
During my time at the White House, I helped Vice President Biden tackle the
surge of unaccompanied minors coming from El Salvador Guatemala and Honduras
that started to arrive in the summer of 2014, so I know how tough this challenge
is, but I also know that racists intolerance, manufactured emergencies, and
phony walls are not a real answer to a humanitarian crisis that requires
investments in addressing the economic deprivation, corruption, and violent crime
that are driving these families to come here in the first place. In the years
ahead, we can expect even more people to be on the move because of a fourth, and I
would argue, most consequential trend: climate change. Despite the landmark 2015
Paris climate Accord global emissions of carbon dioxide and other heat-trapping
gases continue to rise. In the coming decades, the resulting increase in
global temperatures and changing weather patterns could elevate sea levels,
putting billions living in coastal communities around the world at risk and
forcing hundreds of millions to leave their homes. Scientists warn that climate
change could trigger mass die-offs of coral reefs and other vulnerable plant
and animal species, expand zones for infectious disease,
worsen water scarcity and food shortages, and contribute to higher incidence of
natural disasters like forest fires, and increase the frequency of severity and
severity of extreme storms. Consider this, on March 14th of this year, a ferocious
and uncommonly prolonged cyclone slammed into the African country of Mozambique
tens of thousands of homes were destroyed by the storm and hundreds of
thousands of people were displaced, across an area roughly the size of
Luxembourg, the flood zone was so large you could see it from outer space. I
wrote my dissertation at Columbia on the prospects that extreme environmental
stress like climate change could imperil our national security by producing armed
conflict throughout the developing world, and as events like this become more
common, there is no doubt in my mind that climate change is a national security
issue. We’re already seeing the signs. Consider this, the day after that huge
cyclone hit Mozambique, unusually heavy rains pummeled the American Midwest
causing significant flooding. Among the areas that were flooded was
Offutt Air Force Base, the home of U.S. Strategic Command our nuclear weapons
command and home to more than 10,000 U.S. military personnel. Floodwaters reached
up to seven feet deep, forcing one-third of the base to
relocate and causing billions of dollars of damage. Right after the storm, a friend
of mine, also a kind of a national security nerd, reached out to me via
email and said no terrorists in their wildest dreams could cause that much
damage to an American military base. So we are already seeing the early
indicators of the existential risks climate change could pose and the
consequences and scientists believe that we ain’t seen nothing yet.
According to the intergovernmental panel on climate change, many of the dire
consequences of climate change could be upon us as early as 2040, which means
when you all are my age, right, which may seem a long time from now, but it’s not
that long of a time, you will be living in a warming world and we
will need your help to rapidly decarbonize our economy and find more
sustainable ways to live. If you are going to bring about positive change in
our world it is imperative to understand how the world works that is why you’re
focused on international relations during your time here at Stanford is
such an invaluable invaluable asset. Stepping back to look at the big picture,
I believe the mega trends I just surveyed are already contributing to, and
are likely to accelerate, important shifts in the underlying structure of
the international system and how power is exercised within that system. The
things that you have studied in your IR classes, the key actors and the forces at
work in our world, are rapidly moving targets. To be sure Westphalian
nation-states, the building blocks of the modern international system, still matter
in fact if anything traditional geopolitics is making a bit of a
comeback as the global primacy of the United States which we’ve enjoyed since
the of the Cold War is being increasingly
challenged by a more assertive Russia and, most consequentially, a rapidly
rising China. Consider the fact that by some measures, China’s economy is already
bigger than ours and, by any measure, the total size of China’s economy will
surpass ours in the next decade. Meanwhile China is modernizing its
military, advancing its own international institutions, seeking to establish its
own international rules on everything from trade to governing the internet,
carving out a sphere of influence in places like the South China Sea, building
a network of strategic partnerships around the globe through its Belt and
Road initiative, seeking to dominate technologies of the future like
artificial intelligence and robotics, and attempting to prove that its own model
of techno authoritarian capitalism can outshine and outperform the American
democratic experiment. So how the United States manages its relationships with
Beijing and other major powers in the years ahead will matter a great deal for
our prosperity, for our security, and for our way of life. But things are getting
even more complicated, even if states remain crucial players on the world
stage, our planet is not just a collection of billiard balls crashing
into each other. For one thing, the changing nature of technology in the
global economy means that power is not only being more evenly distributed among
states, it is increasingly diffused away from states towards non-state actors.
Consider the fact that Facebook, which is a little company down the road this way,
is a key information platform for 2.27 billion users, or about one third of all
of humanity. That’s power. Or consider the fact that Apple, down
that way, has 237 billion dollars in the bank right now, which is equivalent to
the GDP of Egypt, a country of 80 million people and is equivalent it is bigger
than the GDP of three-fourths of all countries on the planet. As power
diffuses in this way, the scholar, Ann-Marie Slaughter, has convincingly argued
that the world should no longer be viewed as merely a chessboard being
played by nations, it is a spider web made up of intersecting networks of all
types of public and private actors from large
corporations, to terrorists and criminal networks, to transnational NGOs. We will
need your help figuring out how to play chess and navigate this spider web at
the same time. What’s more, we all have to grapple with the reality that power, in
the form of legitimate authority and influence, is not only more diffused, it
is also breaking down within many countries at the extreme, of course, this
manifests itself in failed states in places like Afghanistan or Libya or
Yemen or Somalia. But there is also a growing crisis within advanced
industrial democracies like our own and among many emerging nations, where
citizens increasingly believe their leaders and institutions are not
responsive, effective, or accountable in the face of rapid economic cultural and
environmental change. The center of the political spectrum which has been long
dominated- which has long dominated politics and established democracies, has
failed to adequately address the disruption and dislocation produced by
globalization and technology and the cultural anxieties produced by mass
migration. This has produced political openings for more extreme nationalist
parties and agendas, often at odds with democratic traditions of openness,
tolerance, civility, and inclusivity. As a result, democracy itself seems to be in
retreat in many places. Indeed, according to the organization Freedom House, of the
41 countries that were consistently ranked as “free” from 1985 to 2005, 22 of
those 41 countries have registered net declines in freedom in just the last
five years. In this rapidly evolving international landscape, we will need you
to help us boldly reimagine and reinvigorate our policies and our
institutions. My generation and older generations still have enormous burdens
to carry, but we can’t carry them alone. Your education at Stanford and your time
here at the Silicon Valley has exposed you to many of the forces that are
shaping this century, now we need your help to bend these forces towards our
common good. If you plan to go and work in the
private sector, make sure that those killer apps that you design are not
actually killer apps and make sure that the finance that you help mobilize is
for the betterment of a society not just the bottom line of shareholders,
if you become an academic, like me, try to study something important, something
timely, something relevant, and resist the ivory tower incentives to remain aloof
from the real world. This is something that I tried to do in my entire career
because in the end nerds like us should be writing things that not only matter
up here, but matter out there. If you go to work for a non-profit or for an
international organization, design practical and innovative solutions to
make our economy more environmentally sustainable or to address the daily
indignities that so many people around the world still face. Help others grab
onto the ladder of opportunity that you take for granted and if you’re
considering public service, do it, do it. Take it from me, someone who, when I was
your age, just wanted to grow up and be a college professor. Actually, the truth is
I applied to twelve graduate schools, I got ten rejection letters before I got
the first acceptance so I was actually planning on being a high school teacher,
but in any case, after getting into Columbia, I then planned to be a college
professor, I had no intention at all of serving in government but looking
back, having spent about half of my professional life since 9/11 in public
service. I see it as, by far in a way, the most rewarding and impactful thing
I’ve ever done, look it doesn’t matter who the president is whether you like
him or her or like their administration or not, the fact is your country needs
you. I was a political appointee in the Obama administration, so my personal
politics are not a secret, but my first gig in government was an 18-month stint
at the Department of Defense working in the stability operations office in the
middle of the George W. Bush administration.
Don Rumsfeld was still the Secretary of Defense at the Pentagon at that time, the
wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were sliding off the rails, things were so bad
that the 24 of us working in that tiny stability operations office used to joke
that the 20 more of us did stability operations and the other 24,000
employees working at the Pentagon did instability operations. But the issues
that I worked on, including thinking about ways that our military could were
to retool itself for complex contingencies, humanitarian crises, and
counterinsurgency operations could not have been more important. Look, when you
get past all the daily noise and the conspiracy claims about the deep state,
the reality is that most foreign policy is designed and implemented by patriotic
public servants, not political folks. Our diplomatic corps, our military, our
intelligence law enforcement and aid professionals and so many others, our
country cannot be safe or prosperous or for free without people willing to serve.
So I hope that at least some of you will. Look, the world out there is daunting
I’ve certainly provided a litany of horrors today on this graduation day, but
it’s also full of incredible promise and you as Stanford graduates are blessed
with the skills to make a difference, I have faith in you, I’m excited for you,
and I hope that you’re excited too there are so many ways you can make the world
better and we desperately desperately need you too so go forth, roll up your
sleeves, put your heads together, get to work, and, for the sake of all of us, do
good things. Thank you very much. Thank You, Professor Kahl, for that
incredibly inspirational speech, I am now delighted to introduce our two student
speakers I’ll start with the first student speaker,
Audrey Wynn, as- I’m gonna introduce you- as an international relations major and
a human rights minor, Audrey focused on international refugee policy,
gender-based violence, and post-conflict reconciliation. She interned at the U.S.
department of justice at the office of U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein, at lawyers
for Human Rights in Cape Town, and at the Justice Center Hong Kong. On campus, she
was deeply involved with the Honda Center for Human Rights and
international justice and with the Haas Center for Public Service. She also
served as co-president of Stanford women’s coalition and director of the
feminist narratives project at the Women’s community center.
Audrey’s honors thesis, an investigation of sexual violence during the Vietnam
War, won the I.R. honors program thesis prize and the award for excellence and
honors thesis presentation. she also received an Alumni Association Award of
Excellence and she is graduating with distinction. Next year, Audrey will work
in U.S. immigration law and policy as a John Gardner public service fellow.
Please join me in welcoming Audrey. When I applied to Stanford in 2014, I
wrote my personal statement on the conversations that took place at my
family’s dinner table, I reflected on the ways in which these conversations
instrumentally shaped my worldview and sense of self, and shared my aspirations
for the kinds of conversations I would one day have in college. Despite my great
ambitions nothing could have prepared me for the opportunities for conversation I
found at Stanford, never in my wildest dreams could I have imagined that, as an
undergraduate, I would sit at a table with a Supreme Court justice, a U.N. High
Commissioner of Human Rights, a former director of the CIA, or a senior advisor
to a former President of the United States. While 18 year-old Audrey had
certainly fantasized about a Monday afternoon I might spend sitting in an
oversized armchair across from Ruth Bader Ginsburg
discussing the importance of women’s representation on the Supreme Court over
a plate of dark chocolate Sprinkles Cupcakes. No part of me believed that it
might actually come true and yet there she was one Monday afternoon, the
notorious R.B.G., an arm’s length away insisting that there will not be enough
women on the Supreme Court until there are nine and reminding us that we must
live not for ourselves, but for our communities. These are exactly the kinds
of conversations we have all been a part of in our last four years as
international relations majors at Stanford
with some of the world’s most influential leaders in foreign policy,
economics law, and social justice, as well as some of the most influential future
leaders in these fields, each other. One of the first tables I had a seat out
during my time at Stanford was Professor Jim Fearon, on it was my first day of
college and 16 of us sat around a long rectangular table in a stuffy
third-floor room and Cubberley. Professor Fearon mysteriously swirled his coffee
mug around in circles as he does as we all waited in nervous anticipation over
the course of 10 weeks we learned about the phenomenon of civil war through the
lens of Syria, an ongoing crisis unfolding before our
very eyes. Our conversations often felt like secret policy conferences, where
Professor Fearon, on one of the most influential international relations
scholars of our time, would share his highly coveted insight and policy
predictions with all of us as we frantically transcribed his every word
and questioned our own preconceived notions about the origins of ethnic
conflict. Fast-forward to Fall quarter of my
junior year, when I participated in the Stanford and Washington program. By day,
my classmates and I interned in the U.S. Congress, the State Department, and
leading policy think tanks. By night, we took classes with Deputy Assistant
secretaries of state, world famous journalists, and senior attorneys of the
Department of Justice. Many of us stood in the halls of the Senate the day that
thousands of dreamers stormed the capital to advocate for their rights to an
education and citizenship in the U.S. as a first generation American, I remember
looking out at the endless stream of students and feeling as if I could have
just as easily been one of them. The morning after the Vegas shooting, I sat
in a room with councils on a Senate Judiciary minority committee and watched
them fervently negotiate over the content of a new gun control bill in the
hopes it might actually pass and, one lucky afternoon, I scored the last seat
in the Senate hearing room to watch Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, testify
before Congress regarding Russian interference in the 2016 presidential
election keeping a tally in the upper right hand corner of my notebook, of the
month number of times he said, “I don’t recall.”
Needless to say, some of these opportunities were more inspiring than
others. For my I.R. honors thesis research I traveled to Vietnam,
where I sat across the table from Vietnamese diplomats, prisoners of war,
and former communist revolutionaries, as they described their experiences with
the U.S. military during the Vietnam War. We must all understand this history they
told me, only then can we move forward. The opportunity to study abroad as an I.R.
major also took me to Cape Town, South Africa, where I found myself sitting
around a massive marble table in the halls of the South African Parliament on
the day President Jacob Zuma was ousted from office. The cheers that erupted
through the building were deafening. While all of these moments have been
integral to my understanding of the world and of the people in it, I realize
now that I have only been able to make sense of these moments through
conversations with all of you, my peers. These are the conversations that have
fundamentally shaped Who I am today as a scholar, as a leader, and as a human being.
The conversations have been in my Freshman Seminar with Professor Fearon,
where students from around the world India, Bahrain, Mexico, Turkey gather
together each week to share a seemingly infinite supply of diverse perspectives
on Civil War and ethnic conflict. The conversations have been at Stanford in
Washington, where my favorite part of everyday was dinner in the S.I.W. dining
room, surrounded by friends, many of whom were in the audience today. As we
discussed our passion for criminal justice, reform memes of Rex Tillerson,
and the latest gossip in the Pentagon, the conversations have been in Cape Town
across rickety pool tables at the college dive bars that lined Long Street,
where my friends and I learned about the continued legacy of apartheid from local
university students as they inquired, why American students found it so difficult
to talk about race. Here on campus these conversations have taken place at tables
in Wilbur dining and Koopa and Encina Hall with my fellow I.R. students, the
people I believe will one day become the future directors of the F.B.I., judges
for the International Criminal Court, our next UN Secretary General, and even
President of the United States. It is the conversations we have had on everything
from the spread of radical extremism and nuclear non-proliferation policy, to how
to meet our applied econ requirement without taking math 51, it is the late
nights we’ve spent wondering about the future of this country and of the world
we will leave for generations to come. These conversations are what I will miss
most about college, I will miss that no idea has ever been too big or too
ambitious for these tables. Over the last four years, the energy and innovation
that has sprung from these conversations has restored my faith in this country
and in our collective ability to change the world. In a matter of years, I know
that you all, the class of 2019, will be sitting at some of the most influential
tables in the world, will be meeting with activists and government officials and
community organizers in every corner of the globe. My hope is that we will
approach these tables with some of the principles we developed throughout our
college years, the optimism and ambition we had as Freshmen, the flexibility and
open-mindedness we developed as Sophomores, the communication skills we
honed as Juniors and of course a healthy dose of pragmatism during Senior year. I
hope we will make space for new ideas and opinions, no matter how different
they are from our own. I hope that we will always consider those who are not
sitting at the table with us, and make every effort to include and elevate
their voices. I hope that we will continue to believe in the power we each
hold as individuals and remember the tremendous responsibility that comes
with it. What a great privilege it has been to have a seat at the table with
all of you, to have been given four years of life to think critically about the
world around us in the company of the most creative, compassionate, and
brilliant thinkers that I know. Congratulations to the class
of 2019, here’s to a lifetime of meaningful conversation. Audrey, thank you
for that terrific speech, our second student speaker is Lloyd Lyle. Lloyd is
graduating with honors and international relations and minors in economics and
political science. He studied abroad in Paris, held summer
research positions in Belgium and Cote D’ivoire, and contributed to reports for
the Canadian Parliament and U.S. Commission on International Religious
Freedom. On campus, Lloyd was a Stanford tour guide, an international relations
peer advisor, and vice president of the Stanford Debate Society. His honors
thesis used satellite data and sophisticated statistical methods to
evaluate post-conflict reconstruction in Iraq. Lloyd’s thesis won the university’s
Firestone medal for excellence in undergraduate research, he also received
the Alumni Association’s Award of Excellence in his graduating Phi Beta
Kappa Pi Sigma Alpha and with distinction.
Next year, he will return to his home country of Canada to start law school at
the University of Toronto. Please join me in welcoming Lloyd to the stage Fellow graduates, faculty, and staff,
friends and family, good afternoon. Foreign policy magazine says they can
teach you everything you’ll remember about a B.A. in international relations in
five minutes, trade is good, norms are constructed
anarchy rules, power talks, and people make mistakes, it’s that simple. So is there
anything else to it? My best answer is that I.R. changes the way that we see the
world, here’s an example, any upperclassmen at this school can tell
you that if you don’t enroll in introduction to wine tasting in the
first 20 seconds of course enrollment, that course will be full, most students
would agree with me when I say it might be better if we all waited five minutes
to enroll in wine tasting and enrolled in the courses we actually need to
graduate first. But everybody’s sitting here can also
tell you that although we all know this, no one will wait and everyone will
enroll in wine tasting right away. After four years of international relations, we
are still complicit in this madness but now we can tell you why it happens, your
friends can’t credibly commit to wait to enroll introduction to French viticulture faces a commitment problem. It turns out that, as I.R. majors, we’ve
learned to see this strategic interaction everywhere in everyday life
when people hoard cutlery in their dorm rooms and there’s no plates left in the
kitchen we see a tragedy of the commons, when the Daily and the Review engage in
op-ed wars we see a security dilemma, when your friend and their crush are
both playing hard-to-get we tell them they’re in a coordination dilemma and
their love is kind of like a stag hunt, and when a political science major asks
us why our major is different from the international relations political
science track, we explain to them the difference between monopoly money and
real money. There’s no doubt that being an I.R. major gives us the verbage to
describe ordinary things in complicated ways, but maybe one of the best things we
take from this major is the reverse we learn to describe complicated things
simply. The Kyoto Protocol and the lack of clean plates in row houses could not
be more different problems, but they’re both driven by the same core incentives
nobody wants to clean up a common mess on their own. We’re never going to learn
every nuance of every future puzzle, we often don’t even know what tools we’ll
have to work with, so instead we’re learning to simplify, complexity, I.R. is
teaching us to distill common patterns from the world that we observe and apply
them to new scenarios we’ve never seen before. We’re learning to find the
familiar in the unknown and use it to shape our approach to problems that we
have never seen. I think I.R. is as much process as it is knowledge, it’s learning
how to tinker with the machinery that drives strategic choices in an uncertain
world. It’s a good time to be trained to solve from common foundations because
the world we enter is as complicated and problematic as ever, from the Islamic
state, to Ebola from reclined state to Sinjar, from refugees to tourism, fake
news and climate change, the international quality of today’s crises
is striking, the breadth of solutions required is terrifying and, in the face
of this challenge, it’s easy to look at this scene and feel defeated, but I.R.
majors don’t give up that easily and I say this from experience, because our
class is already fighting back we are industrious global workers there
are graduates here today who have interned on the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee or in the State Department at the American embassies in fog and Seoul
at the Brookings Doha Center and at the United Nations in Geneva.
We’re assiduous researchers, graduates sitting in this crowd have worked under
former national security advisors and secretaries of state, key professors and
top political figures and ambassadors here today is somebody who conducted
fieldwork in Vietnam on the legacy of the Vietnam War and somebody who scoured
the Berlin archives who had understand the history of Sino-German military
cooperation, third graduates here today who have interviewed Aboriginal leaders
in Alaska, Rohingya representatives from Myanmar, and American presidential
candidates and we’re dynamic and interesting humans
outside of academics, sitting here today is a Stanford class president, a tour
guide manager, a certified scuba diver and a Pinta lingual, there are also
acapella singers, freshman R.A.s, and a future Philadelphia Eagles receiver. So
what unites the vastly diverse class behind us? We do a forest of different
things, but we bring a similar tool box to all of them, we’re the pattern finders
and the problem solvers. Here’s an example, the Stanford amends conference
convenes young leaders from around the Middle East and North Africa and addresses
understanding and progress every year. When shifts an immigration policy made
it unclear whether some of these people could come to Stanford one of the
graduates sitting here today helped move that conference to Oxford so that it
could go ahead. It’s one of the many examples of how this class has solved
problems. Graduates here today have organized voter registration campaigns,
they’ve rallied students to protests, and worked on the front lines of social
justice initiatives around the world. So my answer to foreign policy is both yes
and no, yes we can distill the core of our degree in five minutes, but our
ability to extract that clarity and act on it are the skills that take years to
learn. As puzzle solvers in a complex world I hope that we stay ambitious and
tenacious, but I also hope that we remember to balance our ambition by
taking time to do the things we love and spending time with the people who are
important to us. I hope we judge ourselves by what we do, not how we’re
recognized, and remember that sometimes making the biggest impact means letting
somebody else be in the spotlight. I hope we remember that good leadership often
requires compromise, sacrifice, realistic planning, and hard work and that
sometimes this means we have to give up our dream vision to come up with
something that works. I also hope we remember we don’t have to
do everything, do what you love and do it well. After today some of us are off to
work in NGOs and government in the private sector, others to graduate or
professional school, wherever we’re going next one of
the great strengths of being a Stanford I.R. grad is that we can count on each
other to be friends, advisors, and confluence. I think we have a lot of work
still to do and I think we’ll be far better at it if we do it together. As a
class we owe a great debt to our professors, administrators in the school
as well as the friends and family who have supported us over our undergraduate
careers. In particular, today, I’d like to recognize Professor Tomz who steps down
after seven years directing our program, and I want to leave us today with a
comment on who we find patterns and solve puzzles with. There are a great
many brilliant people in the world who do not have Stanford degrees, not because
they’re not smart, but because the circumstances of their lives made it
impossible or because they simply chose not to. I hope that we open ourselves to
passionate people with brilliant ideas no matter who they are or where they
come from and then we weld our degrees not as crowns of intelligence, but as
toolkits to help us and those around us create change in an uncertain world. It
is a tremendous privilege to hold the Stanford I.R. degree, our job now is to bring
honor to that privilege. Friends, best of luck. Dads, happy Father’s Day. To all,
congratulations. Loyd thank you so much for those
terrific remarks and now, the moment you’ve all been waiting for, the awarding
of the diplomas, three of my colleagues, Doctors Erica Gould,
Robert Rakove, and Steve Stedman will assist with the diploma ceremony
allow me to introduce them briefly. Dr. Erica Gould is a lecturer in
international relations and the director of our honors program, she teaches
courses on thesis, writing international political economy, and international
organizations, she received her B.A. from Cornell University and her PhD in
political science from Stanford. Dr. Gould is the author of “Money Talks:
the International Monetary Fund Conditionality and Supplementary Financiers” she has also published numerous academic articles and she serves on the
board of accountability counsel, an international NGO based in San Francisco.
Before joining our program at Stanford, Dr. Gould taught at the University of
Virginia and at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Robert Rakove is a lecturer in
international relations, he received his doctorate in U.S. history from the
University of Virginia, but he is also a proud Cardinal having received his
bachelor’s in political science from Stanford in 1999 and his master’s in
2000. Dr. Rakove is the author of “Kennedy, Johnson, and the Non-aligned
World: a History of U.S. Policy Toward the Third World in the Early and Mid-1960s”
His current research concerns U.S. Afghan relations in the decade after the
Soviet invasion he has previously held fellowships at the University of
Virginia, the Ohio State University, the University of Sydney, and the Hoover
Institution. I’m also delighted to introduce Professor Steven Stedman who
will be handing out the diplomas today. Professor Stedman is a senior fellow at
the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. A professor by
courtesy of political science at Stanford and deputy director of Stanford
Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. This past year
professor Stedman chaired the University’s Faculty Senate.
Professor Stedman plays a central role in international education here at
Stanford, he teaches classes on international security and directs the
C.D.D.R.L. Honors Program. He has taught at Stanford’s abroad program in Cape Town
and traveled with students to Europe to study the origins of World War One. Back
on campus Dr. Stedman and his wife, Corrine Thomas, our resident fellows and
Carruthers Stanford’s academic theme house on
global citizenship. In 2018, professor Stedman won the Lloyd B.
Dinkelspiel award which is Stanford’s highest honor for service to
undergraduate education. Finally Dr. Stedman has an incredible record of
international public service, from 2003 to 2004, he served as research director
for the UN high-level panel on threats challenges and change, in 2005, he was the
assistant secretary-general and special advisor to the secretary-general of the
United Nations, from 2010 to 2012, he chaired the global Commission on
Elections, Democracy, and Security, an international body to promote and
protect the integrity of elections worldwide, and now, he is serving as
Secretary General of the Kofi Annan Commission on Elections and Democracy in
the Digital Age, which examines how social media affects the integrity of
elections. Professor Stedman not only works at Stanford, he also received his
B.A., his M.A., and his PhD degrees from Stanford. So I think it’s pretty obvious
that he loves the farm. Professor Stedman, we are honored to have
you here today and we are delighted that you will be helping us by awarding the
diplomas. Now finally I’d like to recognize and thank several colleagues who have joined us on the stage for today’s ceremony,
they include Professors Jasmina Bojic, Bert Patenaude, Gil-li Vardi, our dynamic
associate director, Dr. Paul Festa, and our wonderful program manager, Jessica
Michael, thanks to all of you for your help with today. The diploma ceremony
will proceed as follows: Dr. Gould and Rakove
will read the graduates names and brief biographies. Graduates, as your names are
called, please come on stage to my right. Professor Stedman will hand you your
diploma, Professor Kahl will congratulate you, and
I will provide a final handshake. You will exit to my left here and return to
your seat. To help the ceremony go smoothly, I would ask everyone to please
hold your applause until all the graduates have received their degrees. At
that time, I will invite everyone to congratulate the class of 2019.
Now, one last detail about photos: parents, of course, you are welcome to take photos
if you would like some close-ups of your graduate, please make your way to the
front when your son or daughter is about to be called. Graduates, a professional
photographer will be taking pictures. If you fill out the card at your seat, I
know some of you have, already the photographer will send an email with the
link to your proofs. And now, I will give the podium to doctors Gould and Rakove who will begin reading the names of our graduates.
Professor Stedman, could you please come forward to hand the students their
degrees and, Professor Kahl, could you please join me in the receiving line?
Just as a reminder, please hold your applause until the end of the ceremony. Martin Biaduma is from Iloilo City,
Philippines. He loves simulation classes, learned French
and studied abroad in Paris. He is a Gates Millennium scholar and a
leadership enterprise for a diverse America scholar. Martin worked as a
blockchain research assistant and a project manager and, after graduation,
will begin a career in technology. Caitlin Clair Albertoli from San
Clemente, California. She studied Spanish and minored in
psychology, she is the CEO of the Governor’s Corner Dining Society’s
nonprofit and of her own company Buzz Solutions which provides software
analytics for powerline inspections to reduce wildfires. After graduation
Caitlin looks forward to running her company full-time. Jennifer Nicole Ampi
is from Rockville, Maryland. She learned Spanish and studied abroad
in Santiago, she was a Haas Center peer advisor, the co-president of Stanford
Mental Health Outreach, a recipient of the Haas Center Walked the Talk service
leadership award, and Alumni Association Award of Excellence and a member of the
Stanford women’s rugby team. After graduation, Jennifer plans to pursue a
dual degree in law and journalism and advocate for the ethical treatment of
human rights violation survivors. Grace Lois Anderson is from Boston,
Massachusetts. She specialized in international security and studied
abroad in Florence, attended Stanford and Washington, and minored in Italian. She
was director of marketing for Stanford and Government, a student intern in the
office of Condoleezza Rice and a member of the Alpha Phi sorority. She received
an Alumni Association Award of Excellence and is graduating with I.R.
honors. A recipient of the Tom Ford fellowship in philanthropy through the
Haas Center, Grace will receive an 11-month placement at a U.S. foundation
after graduation. Allison Louise Anglin is from New York City.
She learned Spanish, studied abroad in Madrid, was the Stanford concert network
director, and a Stanford Warner musical fellow. As a Chapel Lugi scholar, she
directed an award-winning ecotourism documentary set in Costa Rica that was
selected for the Barcelona Environmental International
Festival. After graduation, Allison aims to become a leader in the global
entertainment industry. Sean William Barton is from North
Salt Lake, Utah. He specialized in international security, learned French,
studied, with Professor Condoleezza Rice, was a linebacker on the Stanford
football, team a member of the National Football Foundation’s Hampshire Honor
Society, and twice selected to the pac-12 football all academic second team. After
graduation, Sean plans to pursue an MBA. Taylor
McKenna Butsi is from Shaker Heights, Ohio. She specialized in comparative
international governance, learned French, and Spanish, studied abroad in Santiago
and Paris, and minored in Modern Languages. She was a Stanford Dolly with
the university marching band and on the Executive Board of Cai Omega. After
graduation, Taylor plans to pursue a master’s degree
in applied economics and a career in Washington DC. Jennuell Adatta
is from Sammamish, Washington. She specialized in Africa, learned Arabic,
French, and Spanish, studied abroad in Cape Town, and minored in Modern
Languages. She was a director with Stanford in Government a founding member
of Stanford’s Prison Renaissance project co-chair of Stanford Women in Politics
and senior editor at Statik a Stanford Activist Website.
She received a Stanford and government fellowship and was four-time recipient
of the Black Community Dean’s award. After graduation, she plans to attend law
school and pursue a career international human rights or civil rights law. Rand
Summerlind Duarte is from Leonard Town, Maryland. She learned Spanish and Arabic
and studied abroad in Chile, attended Stanford in Washington, completed
internships at the Pentagon and State Department, was a member of Stanford and
government and Stanford United Students for veterans health and was captain of
the intramural sand volleyball team she was research assistant for general HR
McMaster and for the Mapping Militants Project and received an Alumni
Association Award of Excellence. After graduation, Rand will work as a
government analyst in Washington DC. Nawa Gideon Hachi is from Mary Belle,
France. She studied abroad in Australia in Cape
Town and completed minors in human biology and human rights.
She was president of the Stanford Club swim team and a member of Stanford
climbing team and Stanford club water polo. She worked as a research assistant
at the Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions and interned at Emergency
First-aid Responders in Cape Town. After graduation,
Nawa will work at the Stanford center for ocean solutions and complete a
co-terminal master’s degree in earth systems with the goal of working at the
intersection of human rights and environmental issues on international
waters. Nita Gegishidsa is from Tbilisi, Georgia.
She specialized in international security, speaks Russian, German, and
French, and this autumn will study abroad in Paris. She was a member of Stanford
women in politics and the American Middle Eastern Network for dialogue, she
was a Stanford and government fellow in Hong Kong and the Freeman spogli
Institute Europe Center fellow in Brussels. After graduation, Nita will work in
Georgia before returning to the United States to pursue a master’s in public
policy. Megan Hanes is from Carlsbad, California.
She specialized in international security learned French and German, studied
abroad in Paris, worked as a research assistant at the Hoover Institution, was
a member of Stanford and government and completed an honours thesis in the
Center for International Security and Cooperation. She is graduating PI Delta
Phi and with distinction. After graduation, Meaghan plans to work
in national security and attend law school.
Christina Harris is from Port Orange, Florida. She specialized in Latin
American and Iberian studies, learned Spanish and Portuguese,
and studied abroad in Santiago and Madrid. She worked as a Freeman Spogli
Institute global policy intern and, through the Haas Center for Public
Service, as a peer advisor and Ravenwood reads Ravenswood reads tutor. After
graduation, Kristen will be a research fellow for the American Voices project.
Jet Karina Hayward is from Santa Clara, California. She specialized in Africa,
learned French, and studied abroad in Paris. She did Stanford quarter
internships in Botswana and Bosnia-Herzegovina and served as
associate producer with the Stanford Storytelling Project. She was president
of Stanford women’s rugby and a Women’s Rugby collegiate all-american. She
received an Alumni Association award of excellence and is graduating with
distinction. After graduation, Jet plans to attend law
school and worked with conflict affected population. Hoshrima Hossein is from
Houston, Texas. She specialized in Africa, studied abroad in Cape Town, and
completed a minor in Spanish, she was senior class president, co-president of
Stanford women in business, and financial manager of Jerry house. She received an
Alumni Association Award of Excellence and is graduating with I.R. honors and
with distinction. After graduation, Tisch Rima will work in investment
banking at JP Morgan in New York and plans to attend law school and pursue a
career in civil impact law. Audrey Wynne is from Charlotte, North
Carolina. She learned Spanish and Arabic, studied
abroad in Cape Town attended Stanford in Washington, and completed a minor in
human rights. She was co-president of Stanford women’s
coalition feminist narratives, coordinator at the Stanford women’s
community center, director of fellowships for Stanford and government, and a
recipient of Alumni Association Award of Excellence, and Stanford woman of impact
Awards. She is graduating with distinction and IR honors and has been
awarded the IR honors program thesis prize and the award for excellence in
honors thesis presentation. After graduation,
Audrey will work in U.S. immigration law and policy as a John Gardner
public service fellow. Catherine Irashpinah is from Los Angeles, California.
She specialized in international security, learned Spanish, and studied
abroad in Madrid. She completed an honors thesis in the Center for
International Security and Cooperation, was co-founder of the Stanford
non-proliferation activism project, and served as an IR program peer advisor.
Catherine is graduating Phi Beta Kappa and Pi Sigma Alpha and with distinction.
After graduation, Catherine will pursue a PhD in government at Harvard. Nicole Mary Jacobson is from Ann Arbor, Michigan. She specialized in Africa,
learned Spanish, studied overseas in Madrid, attended Stanford in New York.
completed a human rights internship in Buenos Aires through the Freeman Spogli
Institute and minored in human rights. She received an Alumni Association Award
of Excellence and through the Haas Center for public service
was an education partnership fellow of the Ravenswood reads program a member of
the Public Service Honor Society and a walk the talk service awardee. After
graduation, Nicole will be a Princeton in Latin
America fellow at an education at an education NGO in the Dominican Republic
and plans to pursue a career focused on promoting women’s equality in Latin
America and sub-saharan Africa. Hana Kapasi is from San Antonio, Texas.
she learned Spanish, studied abroad in Santiago, attended Stanford in Washington,
and minored in economics. She was president of Stanford society for
International Affairs, student manager, and tour guide at the Stanford visitor
center, received an Alumni Association Award of Excellence and is graduating
with IR honors. After graduation, Hana will work as a program analyst at the
analysis group in New York City. Alexandra Marie Kelly is from San Diego,
California. She specialized in International Security, studied abroad in Madrid,
completed a second major in history, and minored in Spanish. She interned with
make-a-wish, the Stanford center on global poverty and development and the
department of justice. After graduation, Alexandra will attend Boston College Law
School while continuing to pursue her interest in national security.
Irene Kim is from Los Angeles, California she learned Spanish, studied abroad in
Madrid, and completed an honours thesis in the center foreign national security
and cooperation. She was the director of state and local
fellowships for Stanford and government, an intern with the U.S. State Department
foreign service program, and a project lead for development solutions
organization. Irene received an Alumni Association
Award of Excellence and is graduating Phi Beta Kappa with I.R. honors and with
distinction. After graduation she will work as a legal analyst at Cobra and Kim
in Washington DC Kyle Kinney is from Scottsdale, Arizona.
he learned Chinese, Spanish, and German, studied abroad in Berlin, and completed a
minor in German studies. He was a Hoover Institution
undergraduate council member as well as a member of the Stanford men’s rugby
team and Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He is graduating with IR honors and
received an IR honors program thesis prize. After graduation, Kyle plans to
complete a master’s degree and pursue a career in Washington D.C. Ayano Kitano is
from Tokyo, Japan. She learned German and French, studied
abroad in Berlin, minored in German Studies, and completed an honors thesis
in the center on democracy, development, and the rule of law.
She was a research assistant at the Asia Pacific Research Center and the Center
on democracy development in the rule of law, a member of the Stanford
non-proliferation activism project, and an academic theme associate for
Crothers global citizenship. Hayano is graduating Phi Beta Kappa and with
distinction. After graduation, she will attend Stanford- she’ll attend Harvard Law
School. -I make the slip every time- Ravine Flashland Kumara Singer is from
London, United Kingdom. He learned I’m going to list these here
Chinese, Arabic, Japanese, Russian, French, Spanish, and German, maybe some others too.
[inaudible] Studied abroad in Chile, Japan, and Russia, completed
internships in China and Jordan, and minored in Modern Languages. He is a
member of Doboro Slovo, the Slovak National Honor Society and recipient of
the Craig and Susan macaw Stanford scholarship for international students.
After graduation, Ravine will work for the Japanese government in Hiroshima and
in their international affairs and peace promotion department. Rebecca Nicole Lemeka is from McHenry, Illinois. She specialized in international security,
learned Spanish and studied abroad in Madrid, she was a member of students
against militarism, and a volunteer at the women for Africa foundation in
Madrid. After graduation Rebecca will work as a business consultant for Oracle
and intends to pursue a career in law or organizational management. Winnie Lee is from Lacey, Washington. She
learned Korean and German, studied abroad in Berlin, was a research intern at the
Technical University of Berlin, and a global studies project coordinator at
the Stanford Graduate School of Business.
After graduation, Winnie plans to work for an NGO or in public service.
Siobhan Logan is from Palo Alto, California.
She learned Arabic, Hebrew, and Spanish, studied abroad at the Hebrew University
of Jerusalem, minored in Middle Eastern languages, literature, and culture, and
completed an honors thesis in the center on democracy development and the rule of
law. She was a member of Stanford in government, Tri Delta the public service
honors society and is graduating with a Cardinal service notation in a
recognition of her commitment to public service. After graduation, Siobhan will
study Arabic in Amman, Jordan before attending graduate school. Elena
Diana DianeLlund is from Los Angeles, California. She specialized in
international security, learned Spanish and Portuguese, studied abroad in Madrid,
completed a minor in psychology, and is graduating with IR honors. She
participated in the summer research college and was a member of the Stanford
Women’s Coalition and worked as a tutor coordinator for East Palo Alto tennis
and tutoring. After graduation, Elena will work as a senior research associate on a
2020 presidential campaign. Loyd Aaron Lyle is from Vancouver, Canada.
He learned French, studied abroad in Paris, conducted field research in Cote
D’Ivoire for the Stanford Institute for Economic, Policy, Research, and minored in
economics and political science. He was vice president of the Stanford debate
society and first ever student organizer of the U.S. universities debating
championships he received an Alumni Association award of excellence
and is graduating Pi Sigma Alpha and Phi Beta Kappa and with distinction.
He is also graduating with IR honors and for his honors thesis has been awarded
the Firestone medal for excellence in undergraduate research. After graduation,
Lloyd will attend law school at the University of Toronto.
Lisa Mossack McPhee is from Encinitas, California. She specialized in Latin
American and Iberian studies, learned Spanish and Arabic, studied overseas in
Santiago, and attended Stanford in Washington. She interned as a Freeman
Spogli Institute fellow at the Institute for economics and peace in Sydney and
was a studio lead with design for America. After graduation,
Lisa plans to undertake research and policy advocacy work in Washington DC to
promote human rights, peace, and development around the world. Jacqueline
Mesa Tapia is from San Diego, California. She specialized in Latin American and
Iberian studies and world economy, studied overseas in Oviedo, Spain,
and minored in Spanish. She was president of the U.S. Mexico student initiative
and a member of the Sigma Delta Pi Hispanic Honor Society. After graduation,
Jackeline plans to obtain an MBA and pursue a career in international
business. Renata Marguerite Miller is from New York City. She specialized in
international history and culture, learned Spanish, French, and Portuguese,
studied overseas in Paris, attended Stanford in Washington, and graduated
with IR honors. She was public relations director for the U.S. Mex focused
student initiative, a sophomore College French immersion assistant, and a
Ravenswood Reeds volunteer. After graduation, Renata will be a Fulbright
English teaching assistant in Brazil and hopes eventually to work on
capital hill. Haylana Mueller Shaw is from Flagstaff, Arizona. She specialized
in international security, learned French, Arabic, and Indonesian, studied overseas
in Paris, minored in political science, and completed an honors thesis in the
Center for International Security and Cooperation. She was president of the
American Middle Eastern Network for dialogue at Stanford and editor-in-chief
of the Stanford’s Women’s Coalition publication. After
graduation, Haylana will be a technology and innovation analyst and Hast
community impact fellow at the mayor’s office of technology and innovation in
San Jose. Stephen Newman is from Sunnyvale,
California he specialized in Europe and Russia, learned French, Italian, Spanish,
Russian, Bulgarian, and Polish, minored in Modern Languages, interned with the State
Department in Bulgaria and studied overseas in Paris and Krakow.
He was trumpet section leader for the Wind Symphony, participated in the
Stanford collaborative Orchestra, and is a member of Doboro Slovo, the Slovak
National Honor Society. After graduation, Stephen will pursue a master’s degree at
Stanford in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. Ilaf Osman is from
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She specialized in the Middle East and
Central Asia and studied abroad in Florence. She was the editor in chief of
Mint magazine, the social justice director for the Muslim community, and in
ASSU senator. She received the academic Award of
Excellence from the black community services center. After graduation, Ilaf
plans to pursue medical school and focus on global health efforts in Sudan. Anya
Peterson is from Hong Kong. She learned German and Mandarin, studied
overseas in St. Petersburg, minored in human rights, and is graduating Pi Sigma
Alpha. She participated in the Hoover Institution national security affairs
fellows mentorship program, was a Stanford in government Draper Hills
Fellow, and a member of the Stanford Ski Team. After graduation, Anya will work in
finance and plans to pursue law. Lee Pomerance is from San Francisco,
California. She specialized in Africa, learned Spanish and Swahili, studied
overseas in Madrid, and completed minors in human rights and modern languages.
She was a helper fellow at KERR international in Timor Leste, a cardinal
quarter fellow at KERR enterprises, and a legislative intern in the office of
congresswoman Anna Eshoo. She received an Alumni Association Award of Excellence
and is graduating Phi Beta Kappa and with distinction. After graduation,
Lee plans to pursue a career in global development with a focus on women’s
empowerment and girls education. Kit Ramgopal is from Southampton, New York.
She specialized in international security, learned Arabic, Spanish, and
German, and studied abroad in Berlin, she was managing sports editor for the
Stanford daily, financial director of the American Middle Eastern Network for
dialogue, and an intern at CNBC. She received at the booth prize for
excellence in writing, the Julius Jacobs Journalism Award, and the I D house youth
delegate fellowship. She is graduating Phi Beta Kappa and with distinction.
After graduation, Kit will join NBC’s investigative unit in New York City. Aiden
Mikilleon Salamone is from North Caldwell, New Jersey. He specialized in
the Middle East and Central Asia, learned Arabic and Latin, studied abroad in
Jordan and Oxford, and participated in the Stanford and
Washington program. He was on the Executive Board of Kappa Sigma
Fraternity, a member of the Stanford women in business Ally program, and a
research assistant at the Center for International Security and Cooperation.
After graduation, Adan will move to Beirut and hone his
Arabic. Kanani Sophia Schneider is from Accord, New York. She learned German and
Hawaiian, studied abroad in Berlin, minored in German Studies, and is
graduating with IR honors. She was an immigration and Asylum law intern, a Camp
Kesem Stanford counselor, and a member of the Polynesian dance team. After
graduation, Kanani will intern at the at the two
Tuol Sleng genocide museum in Cambodia and work in the nonprofit
sector prior to attending law school and pursuing international human rights law.
Sandra Isabel Scott is from New Port Richey, Florida. She learned Spanish
studied abroad at Oxford participated in the Stanford in New York program and
double majored in psychology. She was the co-president of Derachose
an intern for the New York City Commission on Human Rights, a Spanish
legal translator at the Stanford Law School
immigration clinic, and a research assistant at the Center for
International Security and Cooperation. After graduation, Sandra will attend
Harvard Law School. Elizabeth Sinclair Schneider is from
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She learned Arabic and Spanish, studied
abroad in Morocco, attended Stanford in Washington, and completed an honours
thesis at the Center for International Security and Cooperation. She was a
member of the Stanford mixed company acapella group, interned at the State
Department, and worked as a research assistant at the Center for
International Security and Cooperation. She is graduating
Beta Kappa and with distinction. After graduation, Elizabeth will join the
Senate Committee on Foreign Relations as a junior professional staff member.
Laurel Gabriela Sim is from los Angeles. California. She specialized in
international security and world economy, learned Korean and Italian, studied
abroad in Florence ,and double majored in sociology.
She was senior vice president of Stanford women in business, vice
president of business development for the Business Association of Stanford
entrepreneurial students, and interned for venture capital firms and consumers
startups. After graduation, Laurel will work at a strategy firm for direct to
consumer brands. Akari Smith is from San Francisco, California. He specialized in
East and South Asia, learned Mandarin, studied abroad in Beijing, and double
majored in East Asian Studies, he interned in Beijing, San Francisco,
Shanghai, and New York, and was a member of the junior and senior class cabinets.
He received the Jackie Robinson foundation scholarship, Ji zing China
fellowship, and the Alumni Association Award of Excellence. After graduation,
Bakari will work as a business associate at Visa in San Francisco and plans to
pursue a master’s in international relations or an MBA. Claire Smith is from
Ottawa, Canada. She studied French and minored in
communication. She was on the varsity women’s cross-country and track and
field teams and was a pac-12 All Academic second team. She served as
financial officer for the Stanford Happiness collective and deputy prime
minister of the Stanford Canadian Club. She received the Cardinal club endowment
award, the Longueville H. and Marjorie price scholarship, the Albert T. Cooke
scholarship, the Leon G. Campbell athletic scholarship,
and the Lucille and Jim Katyn scholarship. After graduation, Claire will
pursue a master’s degree in global governance and diplomacy at Oxford.
Megan Mary Fate Sullivan is from Anchorage, Alaska. She specialized in
international security, learned Italian and Spanish, and studied abroad in
Florence. She interned at NBC News, was involved in Stanford’s pulse magazine,
and is graduating with IR honors. After graduation, Meghan will begin Stanford’s
co-terminal master’s program in sustainability science and practice and
pursue a career in journalism or law. Laura Sussman is from Los Angeles,
California. She specialized in international history and culture,
studied overseas in Paris, learned Italian, and minored in French. She was
managing editor at the Stanford Daily, Research intern at an international
think tank in Brussels, and a member of the French Honor Society, Pi Delta Phi.
After graduation, Laura will attend Columbia University to
pursue master’s degrees in European history politics and society and in
journalism. Gabriela Torres Lorentz Adi is from Brooklyn, New
York. She learned Spanish, studied abroad in
Cape Town, attended Stanford in Washington, minored in human rights, and
completed an honors thesis in the center for democracy development and the rule
of law, she was co-president of the Stanford Women’s Coalition, co-head
teaching assistant for an intergroup communications course, a member of the
Public Service Honor Society, and research assistant at the Clayman
Institute for gender research. She received the hope for prize for
writing in the major an Alumni Association Award of Excellence and is
graduating Phi Beta Kappa and with distinction.
After graduation, Gabriela will teach university level international
relations and law courses in Madrid as a Fulbright English teaching assistant.
Kyle Alexander Van Rensselaer is from Auburn, California. He learned Spanish and
French studied abroad in Madrid and minored in chemistry he was a member of
the Public Service Honor Society, a summer fellow at the California
Department of Conservation, and historian of Alpha Chi Sigma chemistry fraternity.
After graduation, Kyle will intern in Geneva at the United Nations conference
on Trade and Development and in autumn begins Stanford’s for dorcy master’s in
international policy program. Currie Ray Weiland is from Minneapolis, Minnesota.
She specialized in East and South Asia, learned Korean, German, Japanese, and
Spanish, and interned with the State Department in South Korea. A being
overseas Studies program student ambassador, she studied abroad in Japan,
Germany, and England. She received the Stanford cap and gown Leadership Award
the Alumni Association Award of Excellence and is graduating with
distinction. After graduation, Currie will begin Stanford’s for Dorsey
masters in international program and plans to pursue a career in foreign
service. McKenzie Catherine Wiley is from Coronado, California. She specialized in
global health education and human rights, learn Spanish, and will study abroad this
summer in Santiago. She played varsity water polo, was a member of Kappa Alpha
Theta, and served as ambassador of the Rubinstein Bing student-athlete civic
engagement program. Mackenzie plans to attend graduate school overseas. Hello everyone, my name is Paul Festa. I’m
the Associate Director of the IR program this is Jessica Michael, the IR program
student services officer, as Lyle has already noted, professor Tomz has served
as IR program director for the last seven years and is now passing the
directors baton to his colleague, professor Ken Schultz. On behalf of the
IR students, our instructors, and administrative team, I wish to extend to
Professor Tomz a heartfelt thank you for his tireless dedication, inspiring,
leadership, and formidable wisdom. And expertise as a token of our deep
appreciation, we would like to present to Professor Tomz a photo signed by
students and staff that we hope portrays a sense of what he has meant to the IR
program. Thank you, so much for that gift, and for the special four years that
we’ve shared together as you’ve been International Relations majors. Graduates,
now that you’ve received your degrees, please take this opportunity to thank
your parents, relatives, and friends, for their support. And because we can’t celebrate this day
enough, I would say I would ask everyone to please join me in one more hearty
round of applause for the class of 2019. This brings our ceremony to an end,
congratulations to all of you, and please enjoy the rest of this festive day. Thank
you. you

One thought on “2019 Stanford International Relations Diploma Ceremony

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *